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Antecedents and consequences of nurse managers' perceptions of organizational support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169937
Source
Nurs Econ. 2006 Jan-Feb;24(1):20-9, 3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Nancy Purdy
Julia Cho
Joan Almost
Author Affiliation
Nursing Research, University of Western Ontario, School of Nursing, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Nurs Econ. 2006 Jan-Feb;24(1):20-9, 3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Nurse Administrators - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Professional Autonomy
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Self Efficacy
Social Perception
Abstract
The antecedents and consequences of nurse managers' perceptions of organizational support were evaluated. Study results revealed that changeable work environment factors are important precursors of perceptions of organizational support, which, in turn, result in positive work attitudes and better health.
PubMed ID
16583602 View in PubMed
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Building healthy workplaces: time to act on the evidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163776
Source
Healthc Pap. 2007;7 Spec No:42-5; discussion 109-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2007;7 Spec No:42-5; discussion 109-19
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Facilities - standards
Health Policy - trends
Health promotion
Health Services Research
Humans
Nursing Staff
Occupational Health
Organizational Culture
Organizational Policy
Patient care team
Personnel Management - standards
Workplace - standards
Abstract
Numerous initiatives have been developed to create healthy workplaces in healthcare settings. However, despite these efforts nurses continue to experience negative conditions in their work settings and report challenges to maintaining physical and mental health. Stronger incentives must be put in place to ensure that current healthcare settings meet evidence-based standards for healthy work environments.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2007;7 Spec No:26-3417478997
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2007;7 Spec No:6-2517478996
PubMed ID
17478999 View in PubMed
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Clinical educators' empowerment, job tension, and job satisfaction: A test of Kanter's Theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169867
Source
J Nurses Staff Dev. 2006 Mar-Apr;22(2):78-86
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mary-Anne Davies
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Mary-Anne Andrusyszyn
Author Affiliation
London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. Maryanne.davies@lhsc.on.ca
Source
J Nurses Staff Dev. 2006 Mar-Apr;22(2):78-86
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Faculty, Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Internship, Nonmedical - statistics & numerical data
Job Satisfaction
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Power (Psychology)
Professional Autonomy
Professional Role
Psychological Theory
Regression Analysis
Social Perception
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Recruitment and retention of qualified nursing staff are vital to safe patient care and require the expertise of clinical educators to facilitate the nurses' professional development. However, organizational redesign has challenged clinical educators with role ambiguity, job stress, and decreased job satisfaction. This study used Kanter's Structural Theory of Organizational Behavior to examine the relationships between clinical educators' perceptions of empowerment, job tension, and job satisfaction. High levels of workplace empowerment were significantly related to low levels of job tension. In addition, the combination of high levels of empowerment and low levels of job tension was predictive of high levels of job satisfaction. Implications for staff development administrators are discussed.
PubMed ID
16603905 View in PubMed
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Context matters: the impact of unit leadership and empowerment on nurses' organizational commitment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151109
Source
J Nurs Adm. 2009 May;39(5):228-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Joan Finegan
Piotr Wilk
Author Affiliation
Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. hkl@uwo.ca
Source
J Nurs Adm. 2009 May;39(5):228-35
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making, Organizational
Female
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Leadership
Male
Models, Nursing
Models, Psychological
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Personnel Loyalty
Power (Psychology)
Professional Autonomy
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Self-Assessment
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test a multilevel model linking unit-level leader-member exchange quality and structural empowerment to nurses' psychological empowerment and organizational commitment at the individual level of analysis.
Few studies have examined the contextual effects of unit leadership on individual nurse outcomes. Workplace empowerment has been related to retention outcomes such as organizational commitment in several studies, but few have studied the impact of specific unit characteristics within which nurses work on these outcomes.
We surveyed 3,156 nurses in 217 hospital units to test the multilevel model.
A multilevel path analysis revealed significant individual and contextual effects on nurses' organizational commitment. Both unit-level leader-member exchange quality and structural empowerment had significant direct effects on individual-level psychological empowerment and organizational commitment. Psychological empowerment mediated the relationship between core self-evaluations and organizational commitment at the individual level of analysis.
The contextual effects of positive supervisor relationships and their influence on empowering working conditions at the unit level and, subsequently, nurses' organizational commitment highlight the importance of leadership for creating conditions that result in a committed nursing workforce.
PubMed ID
19423988 View in PubMed
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Critical care nurses' perceptions of workplace empowerment, magnet hospital traits and mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176692
Source
Dynamics. 2004;15(4):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Judy A Tigert
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Author Affiliation
Renal Care, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario.
Source
Dynamics. 2004;15(4):19-23
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Critical Care - organization & administration - psychology
Decision Making, Organizational
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Mental health
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Power (Psychology)
Professional Autonomy
Questionnaires
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to test Kanter's Theory (1977, 1993) of Structural Power in Organizations in a sample of Canadian critical care nurses. A secondary analysis of data from a larger descriptive correlational survey design was used to examine the relationships between perceived empowerment, perceived magnet hospital traits and critical care nurses' mental health (n = 75). The instruments in this study included the Conditions for Work Effectiveness Questionnaire II, the Job Activities Scale II, the Organizational Relationship Scale II, the Nurses Work Index-Revised, the Emotional Exhaustion Subscale, and the State of Mind Subscale. Empowerment was significantly and positively related to perceptions of magnet hospital traits (r = .49, p = 0.001). The combination of empowerment and magnet hospital traits explained a significant amount of the variance in mental health indicators: burn-out (19%) and state of mind (12%).
PubMed ID
15638354 View in PubMed
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Decision making for nurse staffing: Canadian perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165517
Source
Policy Polit Nurs Pract. 2006 Nov;7(4):261-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Linda McGillis Hall
Leah Pink
Michelle Lalonde
Gail Tomblin Murphy
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Ann Tourangeau
Jeanne Besner
Debbie White
Deborah Tregunno
Donna Thomson
Jessica Peterson
Lisa Seto
Jennifer Akeroyd
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing & new investigator, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Policy Polit Nurs Pract. 2006 Nov;7(4):261-9
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Data Collection - methods
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Decision Making, Organizational
Evidence-Based Medicine
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Leadership
Models, Nursing
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - supply & distribution
Nursing, Supervisory - organization & administration
Organizational Policy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Pilot Projects
Quality of Health Care
Research Design
Workload
Abstract
The effectiveness of methods for determining nurse staffing is unknown. Despite a great deal of interest in Canada, efforts conducted to date indicate that there is a lack of consensus on nurse staffing decision-making processes. This study explored nurse staffing decision-making processes, supports in place for nurses, nursing workload being experienced, and perceptions of nursing care and outcomes in Canada. Substantial information was provided from participants about the nurse staffing decision-making methods currently employed in Canada including frameworks for nurse staffing, nurse-to-patient ratios, workload measurement systems, and "gut" instinct. A number of key themes emerged from the study that can form the basis for policy and practice changes related to determining appropriate workload for nursing in Canada. These include the use of (a) staffing principles and frameworks, (b) nursing workload measurement systems, (c) nurse-to-patient ratios, and (d) the need for uptake of evidence related to nurse staffing.
Notes
Erratum In: Policy Polit Nurs Pract. 2007 Feb;8(1):71
PubMed ID
17242391 View in PubMed
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Developing and testing a new measure of staff nurse clinical leadership: the clinical leadership survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134538
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2011 May;19(4):449-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Allison Patrick
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Carol Wong
Joan Finegan
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Sciences, School of Nursing, George Brown College, Toronto. apatrick@georgebrown.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2011 May;19(4):449-60
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cooperative Behavior
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Leadership
Male
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Nurse Administrators
Nursing Evaluation Research - organization & administration
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration
Nursing, Supervisory - organization & administration
Ontario
Power (Psychology)
Program Development
Psychological Theory
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Abstract
To test the psychometric properties of a newly developed measure of staff nurse clinical leadership derived from Kouzes and Posner's model of transformational leadership.
While nurses have been recognized for their essential role in keeping patients safe, there has been little empirical research that has examined clinical leadership at the staff nurse level.
A non-experimental survey design was used to test the psychometric properties of the clinical leadership survey (CLS). Four hundred and eighty registered nurses (RNs) providing direct patient care in Ontario acute care hospitals returned useable questionnaires.
Confirmatory factor analysis provided preliminary evidence for the construct validity for the new measure of staff nurse clinical leadership. Structural empowerment fully mediated the relationship between nursing leadership and staff nurse clinical leadership.
The results provide encouraging evidence for the construct validity of the CLS.
Nursing administrators must create empowering work environments to ensure staff nurses have access to work structures which enable them to enact clinical leadership behaviours while providing direct patient care.
PubMed ID
21569142 View in PubMed
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Effect of empowerment on professional practice environments, work satisfaction, and patient care quality: further testing the Nursing Worklife Model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157579
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2008 Oct-Dec;23(4):322-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. hkl@uwo.ca
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2008 Oct-Dec;23(4):322-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Models, Nursing
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Power (Psychology)
Professional Autonomy
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Social Support
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to test Leiter and Laschinger's Nursing Worklife Model linking structural empowerment to Lake's 5-factor professional practice work environment model and work quality outcomes. A predictive, nonexperimental design was used to test the model in a random sample of 234 staff nurses. The analysis revealed that professional practice environment characteristics mediated the relationship between structurally empowering work conditions and both job satisfaction and nurse-assessed patient care quality.
PubMed ID
18431259 View in PubMed
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The effect of problem-based learning on nursing students' perceptions of empowerment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172156
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2005 Oct;44(10):459-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Heidi M Siu
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Evelyn Vingilis
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2005 Oct;44(10):459-69
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Power (Psychology)
Problem-Based Learning
Psychological Theory
Self Concept
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
This study tested Kanter's structural empowerment theory within a university nursing student population. Differences in perceptions of empowerment among nursing students enrolled in either a problem-based learning (PBL) or a conventional lecture learning (CLL) program were examined, as well as the relationship between perceptions of structural empowerment in the learning environment and feelings of psychological empowerment. Participants completed measures of structural and psychological empowerment adapted to educational settings, as well as measures related to exposure to various learning strategies in their programs and clinical problem-solving abilities. Students in the PBL program (n = 41) had significantly higher perceptions of structural and psychological empowerment than students in the CLL program (n = 67). Regardless of academic program, structural empowerment was strongly positively related to psychological empowerment. The results of this study are the first to support the applicability of Kanter's theory to nursing education settings.
PubMed ID
16268042 View in PubMed
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The effects of emotionally intelligent leadership behaviour on emergency staff nurses' workplace empowerment and organizational commitment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152038
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):70-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Carol Young-Ritchie
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Carol Wong
Author Affiliation
Medicine and Family Medicine Services, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(1):70-85
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Data Collection
Emergency Nursing - education
Emotions
Female
Humans
Intelligence
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Ontario
Personnel Loyalty
Personnel Management
Power (Psychology)
Resource Allocation
Staff Development
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to test a model exploring the relationships among emotionally intelligent leadership behaviour, workplace empowerment and commitment. A predictive, non-experimental design was used to test the model in a random sample of 300 emergency staff nurses working in Ontario. A path analysis supported the fully mediated hypothesized model (chi(2)=2.3, df=1, p > .05; CFI=.99, IFI=.99, RMSEA=.08). Perceived emotionally intelligent leadership behaviour had a strong direct effect on structural empowerment (beta=.54), which in turn had a strong direct effect on organizational commitment (beta=.61).
PubMed ID
19289914 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.