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Food security in Nunavut, Canada: barriers and recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165008
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Hing Man Chan
Karen Fediuk
Sue Hamilton
Laura Rostas
Amy Caughey
Harriet Kuhnlein
Grace Egeland
Eric Loring
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Canada. lchan@unbc.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Food Supply
Humans
Income
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The food supply of Inuit living in Nunavut, Canada, is characterized by market food of relatively low nutritional value and nutrient-dense traditional food. The objective of this study is to assess community perceptions about the availability and accessibility of traditional and market foods in Nunavut.
A qualitative study using focus group methodology.
Focus groups were conducted in 6 communities in Nunavut in 2004 and collected information was analyzed.
Barriers to increased traditional food consumption included high costs of hunting and changes in lifestyle and cultural practices. Participants suggested that food security could be gained through increased economic support for local community hunts, freezers and education programs, as well as better access to cheaper and higher quality market food.
Interventions to improve the dietary quality of Nunavut residents are discussed.
PubMed ID
17319086 View in PubMed
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Food Use and Nutrient Adequacy in Baffin Inuit Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5549
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 1999;60(2):63-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
Peter Berti
Sue Hamilton
Olivier Receveur
Harriet Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, McGill University, QC.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 1999;60(2):63-70
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In evaluating adequacy of nutrient intake and relative contribution of locally harvested food (i.e., "traditional" food) and imported market food for 164 Baffin Inuit children and adolescents, 604 24-hour recalls were obtained over a one-year period (1987 to 1988). Market food contributed an average of 84% of dietary energy and traditional food, 16%. Total and saturated fat intakes corresponded closely to current recommendations, while sucrose intakes were higher than recommended. Most age and gender categories had a low prevalence of inadequate intakes of iron, zinc, and protein; over 50% of dietary iron and zinc was provided by traditional food. Calcium and vitamin A were obtained largely through market food, and there was a high risk of inadequacy for both nutrients in all age groups. The diets of 16-18-year-old girls were the most often inadequate, due to high consumption of low nutrient-dense food and low consumption of traditional food. Food items rich in vitamin A and calcium should be promoted, and 16-18-year-old girls specifically targeted for education on food choices and health.
PubMed ID
11551343 View in PubMed
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Source
Public Health Nutr. 2006 Feb;9(1):95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Harriet Kuhnlein
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2006 Feb;9(1):95
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Micronesia
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Public Health
Notes
Comment On: Public Health Nutr. 2005 Sep;8(6A):667-80416236198
PubMed ID
16480539 View in PubMed
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Indigenous peoples' food systems for health: finding interventions that work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166374
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2006 Dec;9(8):1013-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Harriet Kuhnlein
Bill Erasmus
Hilary Creed-Kanashiro
Lois Englberger
Chinwe Okeke
Nancy Turner
Lindsay Allen
Lalita Bhattacharjee
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Macdonald Campus, Ste Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada. harriet.kuhnlein@mcgill.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2006 Dec;9(8):1013-9
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - organization & administration
Food Habits - ethnology
Health
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Population Groups
Program Evaluation
Abstract
This is a short report of a 'safari' held in conjunction with the International Congress of Nutrition in September 2005, in Futululu, St. Lucia, South Africa. Participants were several members of the International Union of Nutritional Sciences Task Force on Indigenous Peoples' Food Systems and Nutrition, other interested scientists and members of the Kwa Zulu indigenous community. The paper describes the rationale for and contributions towards understanding what might be successful interventions that would resonate among indigenous communities in many areas of the world. A summary of possible evaluation strategies of such interventions is also given.
PubMed ID
17125565 View in PubMed
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