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CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 genetic polymorphisms, smoking and breast cancer risk in a Finnish Caucasian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166894
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2007 Sep;104(3):287-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Pia Sillanpää
Liisa Heikinheimo
Vesa Kataja
Matti Eskelinen
Veli-Matti Kosma
Matti Uusitupa
Harri Vainio
Katja Metsola
Ari Hirvonen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2007 Sep;104(3):287-97
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylases - genetics
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - genetics
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Smoking
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We investigated the associations between two CYP1A1 polymorphisms (Ile462Val and Thr461Asn) and one CYP1B1 polymorphism (Leu432Val) and breast cancer risk. The study population consisted of 483 breast cancer patients and 482 healthy population controls, all of homogenous Finnish origin. No statistically significant overall associations were found between the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 genotypes and breast cancer risk. However, a significant increase in the breast cancer risk was seen for women who had smoked 1-9 cigarettes/day and carried the CYP1B1 432Val allele; the OR was 2.6 (95% CI 1.07-6.46) for women carrying the Leu/Val genotype and 5.1 (95% CI 1.30-19.89, P for trend 0.005) for women with the Val/Val genotype compared to similarly smoking women homozygous for the 432Leu allele. Furthermore, when CYP1B1 genotypes were combined with the previously analyzed N-acetyl transferase (NAT2) genotypes, a significant increase in breast cancer risk was found among women who had at least one CYP1B1 432Val allele together with the NAT2 slow acetylator genotype (OR 1.52; 95% CI 1.03-2.24) compared to women carrying a combination of CYP1B1 Leu/Leu and NAT2 rapid acetylator genotypes. This risk was seen to be confined to ever smokers; the OR was 2.46 (95% CI 1.11-5.45) for ever smokers carrying at least one CYP1B1 432Val allele together with the NAT2 slow acetylator genotype compared to ever smokers with the CYP1B1 Leu/Leu and NAT2 rapid acetylator genotype combination. Our results suggest that the CYP1B1 polymorphism may be an important modifier of breast cancer risk in Finnish Caucasian women who have been exposed to tobacco smoke and/or carry the NAT2 slow acetylator genotype.
PubMed ID
17063266 View in PubMed
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Diabetes mellitus and ovarian cancer (Sweden).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18805
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Oct;13(8):759-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Elisabete Weiderpass
Weimin Ye
Harri Vainio
Rudolf Kaaks
Hans-Olov Adami
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. weiderpass@iarc.fr
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Oct;13(8):759-64
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Complications
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We present results from a large, population-based cohort study in Sweden, where we assessed ovarian cancer risk among patients hospitalized for diabetes mellitus. METHODS: The cohort was composed of patients identified in the Swedish In-Patient Register as having a hospital discharge diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in 1965-1994. The follow-up was done by linkages with the national cancer register and other population-based registers. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were used as a measure of relative risk. RESULTS: After exclusion of the first year of follow-up (to avoid selection bias), 141,627 women remained in the cohort, contributing 865,746 years of follow-up to the study. The overall SIR for ovarian cancer was 0.97 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.87-1.08). We found no difference in the risk estimates among women who had been hospitalized for classic complications of diabetes and for those who had not, or according to the duration of follow-up. Women above 40 years of age at first hospitalization presented a SIR of 0.96 (95% CI 0.85-1.07). CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides evidence of lack of an association between diabetes mellitus and ovarian cancer.
PubMed ID
12420955 View in PubMed
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Dietary factors in relation to endometrial cancer: a nationwide case-control study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18878
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2002;42(1):25-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Paul Terry
Harri Vainio
Alicja Wolk
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. pterry@aecom.yu.edu
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2002;42(1):25-32
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Brassica
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Endometrial Neoplasms - etiology
Fabaceae
Female
Humans
Iron - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Abstract
The incidence of endometrial cancer varies up to 10-fold between high- and low-incidence regions, suggesting the importance of environmental factors, including diet, in the etiology of this disease. However, few studies have examined the role of diet in the etiology of endometrial cancer. Using unconditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), we analyzed data from a large, case-control study of Swedish-born postmenopausal women aged 50-74 yr (709 cases and 2,887 controls) residing in Sweden between 1994 and 1995. We found no clear association between foods or food groups and endometrial cancer risk, although high consumption of certain foods, such as Brassica vegetables, coffee, and legumes, might be associated with small-to-moderate reduced risks of endometrial cancer, while red meat consumption might be associated with a small-to-moderate increased risk. Daily use of calcium supplements appeared to lower endometrial cancer risk (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.9, P for trend = 0.04), especially among women with low calcium intake from dairy products. On the other hand, the use of iron supplements appeared to increase the risk (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 0.9-3.3, P for trend = 0.03). The findings are discussed with respect to previous studies and the possible underlying mechanisms.
PubMed ID
12235647 View in PubMed
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Distribution of glutathione S-transferase M1, P1 and T1 genotypes in different age-groups of Finns without diagnosed cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169595
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 2006;30(2):144-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Anu Voho
Olli Impivaara
Jorma Järvisalo
Katja Metsola
Harri Vainio
Ari Hirvonen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, 41 a A, FI-00250, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 2006;30(2):144-51
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinogens, Environmental
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Finland
Genotype
Glutathione S-Transferase pi - blood - genetics
Glutathione Transferase - blood - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Risk
Smoking
Abstract
Xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) are important detoxifiers of hazardous environmental agents, and their polymorphisms may therefore modify the risk of environmentally induced cancers. Consequently, the XME polymorphisms have been extensively studied in this context during recent years. Particular attention has been given to the polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1, P1 and T1 genes. Previous studies have provided abundant data indicating these polymorphisms as important modifiers of individual susceptibility to cancers of environmental origin. It can be postulated that if the at-risk genotypes of these genes were real risk factors for the environmental cancers, their prevalence would presumably decrease with age in cancer-free part of the population.
We tested the hypothesis in a population based group of 2105 Finns (1,051 men, 1,054 women) in five age strata (27, 37, 47, 57 and 67 years of age), all without clinically diagnosed cancer.
For GSTM1 genotype, a significant interaction was seen between gender and age among never smokers (p=0.003). Currently smoking men tended to be less likely (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.31-1.03), and currently smoking women more likely (OR 1.70, 95% CI 0.97-2.97) homozygotes for the GSTP1*B allele compared with never smokers. Moreover, the likelihood of being a concurrent carrier of the putatively protective genotypes of all of the three studied GSTs was almost three-fold (OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.10-7.12) in heavy smokers in the two oldest age-groups compared with the other genotypes.
Our findings based on a novel study design provide support to the previous case-control studies suggesting that GST genotypes modify individual risk of environmentally-induced cancers.
PubMed ID
16638627 View in PubMed
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EPHX1 gene polymorphisms and individual susceptibility to lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173940
Source
Cancer Lett. 2006 Jun 8;237(1):102-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-8-2006
Author
Anu Voho
Katja Metsola
Sisko Anttila
Olli Impivaara
Jorma Järvisalo
Harri Vainio
Kirsti Husgafvel-Pursiainen
Ari Hirvonen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FIN-00250 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Cancer Lett. 2006 Jun 8;237(1):102-8
Date
Jun-8-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Epoxide Hydrolases - genetics
Female
Finland
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Smoking
Abstract
We investigated the roles of EPHX1 Tyr113His and His139Arg polymorphisms in lung cancer susceptibility in a Finnish study population comprising of 230 lung cancer cases and a large control group (n=2105). The controls were distributed into five age strata, which enabled us to examine the potential age-related changes in the putative EPHX1 at-risk genotypes in the cancer free population. Although the exon 3 slow activity associated allele (His113) containing genotypes posed a decreased lung cancer risk compared with the homozygous wild-type Tyr113/Tyr113 genotype (OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.49-0.94), no association was seen for the EPHX1 phenotypes interpreted from the combined exons 3 and 4 genotype data. Neither was any difference seen in the prevalence of the EPHX1 Tyr113His genotypes or interpreted EPHX1 phenotypes in the different age groups.
PubMed ID
16005144 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fatty fish consumption lowers the risk of endometrial cancer: a nationwide case-control study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19332
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002 Jan;11(1):143-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Paul Terry
Alicja Wolk
Harri Vainio
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. pterry@aecom.yu.edu
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002 Jan;11(1):143-5
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Animals
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Diet
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Postmenopause
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The consumption of fatty fish, which contains large amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, may lower the risk of hormone-responsive cancers. Our aim was to study the association of fish consumption and endometrial cancer risk in Sweden, a country with a wide range of high fatty fish consumption. Using data from a large, nationwide case-control study (709 cases and 2888 controls), we analyzed consumption of both fatty (e.g., salmon and herring) and lean (e.g., cod and flounder) fish in relation to endometrial cancer risk, adjusting estimates for a wide range of potentially confounding variables. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed from unconditional logistic regression models fit by maximum likelihood methods. Consumption of fatty fish was inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk. The multivariate OR for women in the highest quartile level (median, 2.0 servings per week), compared to women with in the lowest (median, 0.2 servings per week), was 0.6 (95% CI, 0.5-0.8; P for trend, 0.0002). The corresponding OR for women in the highest quartile level of lean fish (median, 2.5 servings per week), compared to women in the lowest (median, 0.6 servings per week), was 1.0 (95% CI, 0.8-1.3; P-value for trend, 0.72). Total fish consumption was inversely associated with risk, although weakly. Our results suggest that the consumption of fatty fish, but not other types of fish, may decrease the risk of endometrial cancer.
PubMed ID
11815413 View in PubMed
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Increased incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma among younger statin users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123606
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;36(5):421-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Helka Sahi
Virve Koljonen
Tom Böhling
Pertti J Neuvonen
Harri Vainio
Anne Lamminpää
Pentti Kyyrönen
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. helka.sahi@helsinki.fi
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;36(5):421-4
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Carcinoma, Merkel Cell - epidemiology
Causality
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - adverse effects
Immunologic Factors - adverse effects
Incidence
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Risk assessment
SEER Program
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Statins (HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors) are suggested to act as a predisposing factor for autoimmune diseases, have immunomodulatory effects, and possibly prevent some cancer types - the sum of these effects is unknown in cancers of viral aetiology, such as Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Aim of our study was to find out whether statin users in Finland have an increased incidence of MCC.
A cohort of 224715 male and 230220 female statin users during 1994-2007 was identified from the Prescription Register of the National Social Insurance Institution. This cohort was followed up through the Finnish Cancer Registry for MCC up to 2009.
There were altogether 50 cases of MCCs, while the expected number of cases, calculated on the basis of the MCC incidence in comparable Finnish population, was 39.9 (SIR 1.25, 95% CI 0.93-1.65). The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for MCC in ages
PubMed ID
22683172 View in PubMed
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NAT2 slow acetylator genotype as an important modifier of breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176891
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Apr 20;114(4):579-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-20-2005
Author
Pia Sillanpää
Ari Hirvonen
Vesa Kataja
Matti Eskelinen
Veli-Matti Kosma
Matti Uusitupa
Harri Vainio
Katja Mitrunen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Apr 20;114(4):579-84
Date
Apr-20-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alleles
Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase - genetics
Breast Neoplasms - etiology - genetics - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
DNA Primers - chemistry
Environment
Female
Finland
Genotype
Glutathione Transferase - genetics
Humans
Menarche
Menopause
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk
Smoking
Time Factors
Abstract
N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is a polymorphic enzyme participating in the metabolism of numerous pharmaceutical drugs and carcinogens found in tobacco smoke and diet. The NAT2 gene is highly polymorphic and several different allelic variants exist that determine the acetylator phenotype. In the course of our case-control study, we developed a new method based on fluorogenic allele-specific probes for analyzing the C282T and T341C polymorphisms of the NAT2 gene in 483 Finnish breast cancer patients and 482 healthy population controls. The slow NAT2 acetylation capacity-associated genotypes posed a somewhat increased overall breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.73). This association was found to be confined to the advanced (stage III or IV) breast cancer (OR, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.29-5.24). When stratified by smoking habits, women who had smoked
PubMed ID
15609332 View in PubMed
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Occupational exposures and gastrointestinal cancers among Finnish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186106
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2003 Mar;45(3):305-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Elisabete Weiderpass
Harri Vainio
Timo Kauppinen
Kaisa Vasama-Neuvonen
Timo Partanen
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Unit of Field and Intervention Studies, 150 cours Albert Thomas, F-69372 Lyon. Weiderpass@iarc.fr
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2003 Mar;45(3):305-15
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Electromagnetic fields
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gallbladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Medical Record Linkage
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
A cohort including all female workers born 1906 through 1945 (n = 413,877) in Finland was identified through the Population Census of Finland of 1970. Incident cases of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract were explored during 1971 to 1995. Job titles in census records were converted to exposures of 31 occupational agents through a job-exposure matrix. For each agent, the product of level and probability of exposures was calculated and subdivided in three categories: zero, low and medium/high. Poisson regression models estimated relative risks (RR) for each agent, standardized for birth cohort, follow-up period, and socioeconomic status. Adjustment at job title level was done for alcohol use for cancers of the esophagus and liver and smoking for pancreatic cancer. The results showing either statistically significant RR at the medium/high level of exposure (RRH) or statistically significant trend (P
PubMed ID
12661188 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.