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2-year patient-related versus stent-related outcomes: the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120892
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2012
Author
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Per Thayssen
Evald Høj Christiansen
Hans Henrik Tilsted
Michael Maeng
Knud Nørregaard Hansen
Anne Kaltoft
Henrik Steen Hansen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Morten Madsen
Leif Thuesen
Jens Flensted Lassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. okkels@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Date
Sep-25-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - therapy
Death
Denmark
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Revascularization - statistics & numerical data
Single-Blind Method
Sirolimus - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Thrombosis - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are limited head-to-head randomized data on patient-related versus stent-related outcomes for everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES).
In the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) trial, comparing the EES with the SES in patients with coronary artery disease, the EES was noninferior to the SES at 9 months.
The primary endpoint was a composite: cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), definite stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization. Safety and efficacy outcomes at 2 years were further assessed with specific focus on patient-related composite (all death, all MI, or any revascularization) and stent-related composite outcomes (cardiac death, target vessel MI, or symptom-driven target lesion revascularization). A total of 1,390 patients were assigned to receive the EES, and 1,384 patients were assigned to receive the SES.
At 2 years, the composite primary endpoint occurred in 8.3% in the EES group and in 8.7% in the SES group (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73 to 1.22). The patient-related outcome: 15.0% in the EES group versus 15.6% in the SES group, (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.78 to 1.15), and the stent-related outcome: 5.2% in the EES group versus 5.3% in the SES group (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.35) did not differ between groups. Rate of definite stent thrombosis was lower in the EES group (0.2% vs. 0.9%, (HR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.80).
At 2-year follow-up, the EES was found to be noninferior to the SES with regard to both patient-related and stent-related clinical outcomes.
PubMed ID
22958957 View in PubMed
Less detail

25 year trends in first time hospitalisation for acute myocardial infarction, subsequent short and long term mortality, and the prognostic impact of sex and comorbidity: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127603
Source
BMJ. 2012;344:e356
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Morten Schmidt
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Timothy L Lash
Hans Erik Bøtker
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. msc@dce.au.dk
Source
BMJ. 2012;344:e356
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine 25 year trends in first time hospitalisation for acute myocardial infarction in Denmark, subsequent short and long term mortality, and the prognostic impact of sex and comorbidity.
Nationwide population based cohort study using medical registries.
All hospitals in Denmark.
234,331 patients with a first time hospitalisation for myocardial infarction from 1984 through 2008.
Standardised incidence rate of myocardial infarction and 30 day and 31-365 day mortality by sex. Comorbidity categories were defined as normal, moderate, severe, and very severe according to the Charlson comorbidity index, and were compared by means of mortality rate ratios based on Cox regression.
The standardised incidence rate per 100,000 people decreased in the 25 year period by 37% for women (from 209 to 131) and by 48% for men (from 410 to 213). The 30 day, 31-365 day, and one year mortality declined from 31.4%, 15.6%, and 42.1% in 1984-8 to 14.8%, 11.1%, and 24.2% in 2004-8, respectively. After adjustment for age at time of myocardial infarction, men and women had the same one year risk of dying. The mortality reduction was independent of comorbidity category. Comparing patients with very severe versus normal comorbidity during 2004-8, the mortality rate ratio, adjusted for age and sex, was 1.96 (95% CI 1.83 to 2.11) within 30 days and 3.89 (3.58 to 4.24) within 31-365 days.
The rate of first time hospitalisation for myocardial infarction and subsequent short term mortality both declined by nearly half between 1984 and 2008. The reduction in mortality occurred for all patients, independent of sex and comorbidity. However, comorbidity burden was a strong prognostic factor for short and long term mortality, while sex was not.
Notes
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Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2012 Apr;9(4):18622348972
Comment In: BMJ. 2012;344:d780922279112
PubMed ID
22279115 View in PubMed
Less detail

30-year nationwide trends in incidence of atrial fibrillation in Denmark and associated 5-year risk of heart failure, stroke, and death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286741
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2016 Dec 15;225:30-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2016
Author
Morten Schmidt
Sinna Pilgaard Ulrichsen
Lars Pedersen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Jens Cosedis Nielsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2016 Dec 15;225:30-36
Date
Dec-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Cohort Studies
Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Registries
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Time Factors
Abstract
Long-term nationwide trends in atrial fibrillation (AF) incidence and 5-year outcomes are rare.
We conducted a population-based cohort study using the Danish National Patient Registry covering all Danish hospitals. We computed standardized incidence rates during 1983-2012. We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of heart failure, stroke, and death within 5years, comparing 5-year calendar periods with the earliest period (1983-1987) as reference.
We identified 312,420 patients with first-time hospital-diagnosed AF. The incidence rate per 100,000person-years increased from 98 in 1983 to 307 in 2012. The mean annual increase during the 30-year study period was 4%, with a 6% increase annually until 2000 and a 1.4% increase annually thereafter. The incidence trends were most pronounced among men and persons above 70years. Among high-risk subgroups, AF incidence was consistently highest in patients with valvular heart disease or heart failure. The rate of heart failure following AF declined by 50% over the entire study period (HR: 0.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.48-0.51) and the mortality rate declined by 40% (HR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.61-0.63). Within the last two decades, the rate for ischemic stroke declined by 20% (HR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.78-0.84), but increased almost as much for haemorrhagic stroke (HR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01-1.29).
The long-term risk of heart failure, ischemic stroke, and death following onset of AF has decreased remarkably over the last three decades. Still, the threefold increased incidence of hospital-diagnosed AF during the same period is a major public health concern.
PubMed ID
27705839 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute kidney injury treated with renal replacement therapy and 5-year mortality after myocardial infarction-related cardiogenic shock: a nationwide population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274241
Source
Crit Care. 2015;19:452
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Marie Dam Lauridsen
Henrik Gammelager
Morten Schmidt
Thomas Bøjer Rasmussen
Richard E Shaw
Hans Erik Bøtker
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Christian Fynbo Christiansen
Source
Crit Care. 2015;19:452
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - therapy
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dialysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Myocardial Infarction - complications - mortality
Renal Replacement Therapy - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Shock, Cardiogenic - complications - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Myocardial infarction-related cardiogenic shock is frequently complicated by acute kidney injury. We examined the influence of acute kidney injury treated with renal replacement therapy (AKI-RRT) on risk of chronic dialysis and mortality, and assessed the role of comorbidity in patients with cardiogenic shock.
In this Danish cohort study conducted during 2005-2012, we used population-based medical registries to identify patients diagnosed with first-time myocardial infarction-related cardiogenic shock and assessed their AKI-RRT status. We computed the in-hospital mortality risk and adjusted relative risk. For hospital survivors, we computed 5-year cumulative risk of chronic dialysis accounting for competing risk of death. Mortality after discharge was computed with use of Kaplan-Meier methods. We computed 5-year hazard ratios for chronic dialysis and death after discharge, comparing AKI-RRT with non-AKI-RRT patients using a propensity score-adjusted Cox regression model.
We identified 5079 patients with cardiogenic shock, among whom 13% had AKI-RRT. The in-hospital mortality was 62% for AKI-RRT patients, and 36% for non-AKI-RRT patients. AKI-RRT remained associated with increased in-hospital mortality after adjustment for confounders (relative risk=1.70, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.59-1.81). Among the 3059 hospital survivors, the 5-year risk of chronic dialysis was 11% (95% CI: 8-16%) for AKI-RRT patients, and 1% (95% CI: 0.5-1%) for non-AKI-RRT patients (adjusted hazard ratio: 15.9 (95% CI: 8.7-29.3). The 5-year mortality was 43% (95% CI: 37-53%) for AKI-RRT patients compared with 29% (95% CI: 29-31%) for non-AKI-RRT patients. The adjusted 5-year hazard ratio for death was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.22-1.96) for AKI-RRT patients compared with non-AKI-RRT patients. In patients with comorbidity, absolute mortality increased while relative impact of AKI-RRT on mortality decreased.
AKI-RRT following myocardial infarction-related cardiogenic shock predicted elevated short-term mortality and long-term risk of chronic dialysis and mortality. The impact of AKI-RRT declined with increasing comorbidity suggesting that intensive treatment of AKI-RRT should be accompanied with optimized treatment of comorbidity when possible.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26715162 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult height and risk of ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation, stroke, venous thromboembolism, and premature death: a population based 36-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105680
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Feb;29(2):111-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Morten Schmidt
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Pedersen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Olof Palmes Allé 43-45, 8200, Aarhus, Denmark, morten.schmidt@dadlnet.dk.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Feb;29(2):111-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Body Height
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality, Premature
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - diagnosis - mortality
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Stroke - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Venous Thromboembolism - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Few studies have associated height with cardiovascular diseases other than myocardial infarction. We conducted a population-based 36-year cohort study of 12,859 men born in 1955 or 1965 whose fitness for military service was assessed by Draft Boards in Northern Denmark. Hospital diagnoses for ischemic heart diseases, atrial fibrillation, stroke, and venous thromboembolism were obtained from the Danish National Patient Registry, covering all Danish hospitals since 1977. Mortality data were obtained from the Danish Civil Registration System. We began follow-up on the 22nd birthday of each subject and continued until occurrence of an outcome, emigration, death, or 31 December 2012, whichever came first. We used Cox regression to compute hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Compared with short stature, the education-adjusted HR among tall men was 0.67 (95 % CI 0.54-0.84) for ischemic heart disease (similar for myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, and heart failure), 1.60 (95 % CI 1.11-2.33) for atrial fibrillation, 1.05 (95 % CI 0.75-1.46) for stroke, 1.04 (95 % CI 0.67-1.64) for venous thromboembolism, and 0.70 (95 % CI 0.58-0.86) for death. In conclusion, short stature was a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and premature death, but a protective factor for atrial fibrillation. Stature was not substantially associated with stroke or venous thromboembolism.
PubMed ID
24337942 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular risk factor control is insufficient in young patients with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280830
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2016;12:219-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Morten Krogh Christiansen
Jesper Møller Jensen
Anders Krogh Brøndberg
Hans Erik Bøtker
Henrik Kjærulf Jensen
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2016;12:219-27
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body mass index
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dyslipidemias - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Exercise
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Lipase - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Middle Aged
Overweight - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Prevalence
Registries
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Secondary Prevention - methods
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Control of cardiovascular risk factor is important in secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD) but it is unknown whether treatment targets are achieved in young patients. We aimed to examine the prevalence and control of risk factors in this subset of patients.
We performed a cross-sectional, single-center study on patients with documented CAD before age 40. All patients treated between 2002 and 2014 were invited to participate at least 6 months after the last coronary intervention. We included 143 patients and recorded the family history of cardiovascular disease, physical activity level, smoking status, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, metabolic status, and current medical therapy. Risk factor control and treatment targets were evaluated according to the shared guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology.
The most common insufficiently controlled risk factors were overweight (113 [79.0%]), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol above target (77 [57.9%]), low physical activity level (78 [54.6%]), hypertriglyceridemia (67 [46.9%]), and current smoking (53 [37.1%]). Almost one-half of the patients fulfilled the criteria of metabolic syndrome. The median (interquartile range) number of uncontrolled modifiable risk factors was 2 (2;4) and only seven (4.9%) patients fulfilled all modifiable health measure targets.
Among the youngest patients with CAD, there remains a potential to improve the cardiovascular risk profile.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27307744 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clopidogrel discontinuation within the first year after coronary drug-eluting stent implantation: an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259840
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2014;14:100
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Troels Thim
Martin Berg Johansen
Gro Egholm Chisholm
Morten Schmidt
Anne Kaltoft
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Leif Thuesen
Steen Dalby Kristensen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Romer Krusell
Jens Flensted Lassen
Per Thayssen
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Hans-Henrik Tilsted
Michael Maeng
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2014;14:100
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Thrombosis - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Denmark
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Prescriptions
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Ticlopidine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The impact of adherence to the recommended duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after first generation drug-eluting stent implantation is difficult to assess in real-world settings and limited data are available.
We followed 4,154 patients treated with coronary drug-eluting stents in Western Denmark for 1 year and obtained data on redeemed clopidogrel prescriptions and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE, i.e., cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or stent thrombosis) from medical databases.
Discontinuation of clopidogrel within the first 3 months after stent implantation was associated with a significantly increased rate of MACE at 1-year follow-up (hazard ratio (HR) 2.06; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08-3.93). Discontinuation 3-6 months (HR 1.29; 95% CI: 0.70-2.41) and 6-12 months (HR 1.29; 95% CI: 0.54-3.07) after stent implantation were associated with smaller, not statistically significant, increases in MACE rates. Among patients who discontinued clopidogrel, MACE rates were highest within the first 2 months after discontinuation.
Discontinuation of clopidogrel was associated with an increased rate of MACE among patients treated with drug-eluting stents. The increase was statistically significant within the first 3 months after drug-eluting stent implantation but not after 3 to 12 months.
Notes
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Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2003 Feb;56(2):124-3012654406
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1999 Sep;46(4):354-710514943
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Jun 20;113(24):2803-916769908
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PubMed ID
25125079 View in PubMed
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Cognitive test scores in young men and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular morbidity, and death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108648
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Sep;24(5):632-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Morten Schmidt
Sigrun A Johannesdottir
Stanley Lemeshow
Timothy L Lash
Sinna P Ulrichsen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. morten.schmidt@dce.au.dk
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Sep;24(5):632-6
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cognition - physiology
Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
The association between cognitive scores in young adulthood and long-term cardiometabolic risks remains unclear.
Using population-based registries, we followed 6502 military conscripts from their 22nd birthday until death, emigration, or 55 years of age. We calculated risks and hazard ratios (HRs) associating quartiles of cognitive scores (very high, high, moderate, and low) with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, venous thromboembolism, and death before age 55 years.
The 33-year risk of the combined outcome was inversely associated with cognitive scores (26% for low and 16% for very high scores). Compared with very high scores, the HR for the combined outcome was 1.20 (95% confidence interval = 1.02, 1.41) for high, 1.43 (1.22, 1.68) for moderate, and 1.67 (1.43, 1.95) for low scores. Similar HRs were observed for individual outcomes.
Low cognitive score in young adulthood was a strong predictor for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular morbidity, and death before 55 years of age.
PubMed ID
23863323 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the frequency of atrial fibrillation in young obese versus young nonobese men undergoing examination for fitness for military service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105358
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2014 Mar 1;113(5):822-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2014
Author
Morten Schmidt
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Pedersen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Electronic address: morten.schmidt@dadlnet.dk.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2014 Mar 1;113(5):822-6
Date
Mar-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - physiopathology
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Military Personnel
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology - physiopathology
Physical Examination
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - epidemiology
Abstract
The association between body mass index (BMI) in young adulthood and long-term risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) has not yet been examined for men. We conducted a population-based 36-year cohort study to examine the BMI-associated risk of AF in 12,850 young men who had BMI measured at their examination of fitness for military service. AF was identified from the Danish National Registry of Patients, covering all Danish hospitals since 1977. We began follow-up on the twenty-second birthday of each subject and continued until the occurrence of AF, emigration, death, or December 31, 2012. We used Cox regression to compute hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for education and height. The cohort contributed a total of 375,888 person-years of follow-up and the median follow-up time was 26 years (mean 29 years). The incidence of AF per 100,000 person-years was 53 for men of normal weight (BMI: 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m(2)), 54 for underweight men (BMI
PubMed ID
24406109 View in PubMed
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Diagnosis and outcome in a prehospital cohort of patients with bundle branch block and suspected acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106195
Source
Eur Heart J Acute Cardiovasc Care. 2013 Jun;2(2):176-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jacob Thorsted Sørensen
Carsten Stengaard
Christina Ankjær Sørensen
Kristian Thygesen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Leif Thuesen
Christian Juhl Terkelsen
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Eur Heart J Acute Cardiovasc Care. 2013 Jun;2(2):176-81
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bundle-Branch Block - complications - diagnosis - mortality
Denmark
Electrocardiography - methods - mortality
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Myocardial Infarction - complications - diagnosis - mortality
Prognosis
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
Immediate revascularization is beneficial in patients with presumed new-onset bundle branch block myocardial infarction (BBBMI). In the prehospital setting, it is a challenge to diagnose new-onset BBBMI and triage accordingly.
ECG, final diagnosis, and mortality were assessed in a prehospital cohort of 4905 consecutive patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Bundle branch block (BBB) was defined as QRS duration =120 ms caused by delayed intraventricular conduction. Mortality and angiography data were obtained from the Central Office of Civil Registration and the Western Denmark Heart Registry. Definite diagnosis of AMI and the onset of BBB were determined by expert consensus. Patients were divided into four groups: with or without AMI and with or without BBB. Mortality was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier plots and compared using log-rank statistics.
AMI was diagnosed in 954 patients, of whom 118 had BBB. In 3951 patients without AMI, 436 had BBB. Patients with BBBMI were less often revascularized than patients with AMI without BBB (24 vs. 54%, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
24222828 View in PubMed
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