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Advanced paternal age, mortality, and suicide in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143004
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2010 Jun;198(6):404-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Brian Miller
Antti Alaräisänen
Jouko Miettunen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Hannu Koponen
Pirkko Räsänen
Matti Isohanni
Brian Kirkpatrick
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia 30912, USA. brmiller@mcg.edu
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2010 Jun;198(6):404-11
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Parents
Paternal Age
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Class
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Advanced paternal age is a risk factor for adverse health outcomes in the offspring. In a population-based birth cohort from Finland, 10,965 singleton offspring born in 1966 and alive at age 1 were followed to age 39. Hazard ratios were calculated, adjusting for maternal age, gender, paternal social class, and maternal parity. In females but not in males, increasing paternal age was associated with a linear increased risk of suicide (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04-1.24, p /=30, the population attributable risk percentage was 13.7% for all deaths and 7.5% for suicides. Parental age at birth may affect suicide and all-causes mortality risk in the offspring in the general population. The causal pathways and specific disorders associated with this increased mortality are largely unknown.
PubMed ID
20531118 View in PubMed
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Agreement between self-reported and pharmacy data on medication use in the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145028
Source
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2010 Jun;19(2):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Marianne Haapea
Jouko Miettunen
Sari Lindeman
Matti Joukamaa
Hannu Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. marianne.haapea@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2010 Jun;19(2):88-96
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Cohort Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical History Taking - methods
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Disclosure
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To compare self-reported (SR) medication use and pharmacy data for major psychoactive medications and three classes of medications used for different indications, and to determine the socio-economic factors associated with the congruence.
Postal questionnaire data collected in 1997 were compared with the register of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland on the reimbursed prescriptions purchased during 1997. Altogether 7625 subjects were included in this study. Drugs were categorized according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) system.
Kappa values were 0.77, 0.68, 0.84, 0.92 and 0.55 for antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiepileptics, antidiabetics and beta-blocking agents, respectively. Prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa values were almost perfect (0.98-1.00). Reliability of antipsychotics use was better for married subjects than for those who were not married; and of antidepressants use for highly educated and married subjects than for those who were less educated and were not married. Altogether 414 (5.4%) responders and 285 (7.1%) non-responders had used at least one of the selected medications.
Agreement between the SR and pharmacy data was moderate for psychoactive medication use. Even though data collected by postal questionnaire may underestimate the prevalence of medication use due to non-participation it can be assumed accurate enough for study purposes.
PubMed ID
20209650 View in PubMed
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Association between duration of untreated psychosis and brain morphology in schizophrenia within the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140885
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Nov;123(2-3):145-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Matti Penttilä
Erika Jääskeläinen
Marianne Haapea
Päivikki Tanskanen
Juha Veijola
Khanum Ridler
Graham K Murray
Anna Barnes
Peter B Jones
Matti Isohanni
Hannu Koponen
Jouko Miettunen
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland. mattipen@mail.student.oulu.fi
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Nov;123(2-3):145-52
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain - pathology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Functional Laterality
Hippocampus - pathology
Humans
Limbic System - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Psychotic Disorders - etiology - pathology
Regression Analysis
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - pathology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
Duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) has been linked with poor prognosis and changes in the brain structure in schizophrenia at least at the beginning of the disease, but it is still unknown whether DUP relates to brain morphometry in the longer term. Our aim was to analyze the relation between DUP and the brain structure in schizophrenia in the general population, after several years of illness.
Brains of subjects with psychosis from the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort (NFBC 1966) were scanned with MRI during 1999-2001 after an 11-year follow-up. DUP was assessed from medical records and regressed against global and local tissue density measurements. The brain morphometric and the DUP information were available for 46 subjects with DSM-III-R schizophrenia.
The DUP did not correlate with volumes of the total gray or white matter or the cerebrospinal fluid. The length of DUP associated positively with reduced densities of the right limbic area and the right hippocampus.
Long DUP was slightly associated with reductions of gray matter densities in the limbic area and especially the hippocampus after several years follow-up, supporting the hypothesis that, compared to short DUP, long DUP might be a marker of different disease trajectories including subtle morphometric changes.
PubMed ID
20832996 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between suicidal behaviour and impaired glucose metabolism in depressive disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269531
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2015;15:163
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Hannu Koponen
Hannu Kautiainen
Esa Leppänen
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Mauno Vanhala
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2015;15:163
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - psychology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - psychology
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory
Suicidal ideation
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Disturbances in lipid metabolism have been linked to suicidal behaviour, but little is known about the association between suicide risk and abnormal glucose metabolism in depression. Hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia may increase the risk of depression and also the risk for suicide, we therefore studied associations between suicidal behaviour and disturbances in glucose metabolism in depressive patients who had been referred to depression nurse case managers.
Patients aged 35 years and older (N = 448, mean age 51 years) who were experiencing a new depressive episode, who were referred to depression nurse case managers in 2008-2009 and who scored =10 on the Beck Depression Inventory were enrolled in this study. The study was conducted in municipalities within the Central Finland Hospital District (catchment area of 274 000 inhabitants) as part of the Finnish Depression and Metabolic Syndrome in Adults study. The patients' psychiatric diagnoses and suicidal behaviour were confirmed by the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Blood samples, for glucose and lipid determinations, were drawn from participants after 12 h of fasting, which was followed by a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) when blood was drawn at 0 and 2 h. Insulin resistance was measured by the Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI) method.
Suicidal ideation (49 %) and previous suicide attempts (16 %) were common in patients with major depressive disorder or dysthymia. Patients with depression and suicidal behaviour had higher blood glucose concentrations at baseline and at 2 hours in the OGTT. Glucose levels associated positively with the prevalence of suicidal behaviour, and the linearity was significant at baseline (p for linearity: 0.012, adjusted for age and sex) and for 2-hour OGTT glucose (p for linearity: 0.004, adjusted for age and sex). QUICKI levels associated with suicidal behavior (p for linearity across tertiles of QUICKI: 0.026). Total and LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels were also higher in those patients with suicidal behaviour. Multivariate analysis revealed that blood glucose levels, BDI scores and antidepressive medications associated with suicidal behaviour.
Insulin resistance and disturbances in glucose and lipid metabolism may be more common in middle-aged depressive patients with suicidal behaviour.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26199013 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between the duration of untreated psychosis and short- and long-term outcome in schizophrenia within the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118694
Source
Schizophr Res. 2013 Jan;143(1):3-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Matti Penttilä
Jouko Miettunen
Hannu Koponen
Merja Kyllönen
Juha Veijola
Matti Isohanni
Erika Jääskeläinen
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Oulu, Finland. mattipen@paju.oulu.fi
Source
Schizophr Res. 2013 Jan;143(1):3-10
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Association
Cohort Studies
Community Health Planning
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Regression Analysis
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - therapy
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Long duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) may relate to poor outcome in schizophrenia. However, the associations between DUP and outcomes, particularly in later course of illness, remain unclear. Our aim was to explore the associations between DUP and short- and long-term outcomes in schizophrenia.
Data was collected for subjects with schizophrenia (n=89) in the population-based Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort. DUP was obtained from medical records, and its associations with short- (under 2years) and long-term clinical and social outcomes were assessed extending to 20years after the onset of the illness.
Longer DUP predicted longer length of first hospitalisation and increased the risk of rehospitalisation during the first two years. Longer DUP associated with decreased probability of disability pension, smaller amount of time spent in hospital, and higher proportion of time at work during the first 10years of the follow-up.
Regarding early outcome, long DUP may be a modest marker and proxy measure of a more severe clinical phenotype. The divergent results of earlier studies and the association between long DUP and better long-term outcome in our study, indicate that the length of DUP does not necessarily predict poor outcome in long-term follow-up. This may also be due to methodical difficulties, e.g. insufficient power and residual confounding linked to long follow-up studies.
PubMed ID
23178106 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between vitamin b12 levels and melancholic depressive symptoms: a Finnish population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259549
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:145
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jussi Seppälä
Hannu Koponen
Hannu Kautiainen
Johan G Eriksson
Olli Kampman
Jaana Leiviskä
Satu Männistö
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Heikki Oksa
Yrjö Ovaskainen
Merja Viikki
Mauno Vanhala
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:145
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Depression - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Abstract
An association between vitamin B12 levels and depressive symptoms (DS) has been reported in several epidemiological studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate vitamin B12 levels in population-based samples with melancholic or non-melancholic DS as the relationship between vitamin B12 levels and different subtypes of DS has not been evaluated in previous studies.
Subjects without previously known type 2 diabetes, aged 45-74 years were randomly selected from the National Population Register as a part of the Finnish diabetes prevention programme (FIN-D2D). The study population (N?=?2806, participation rate 62%) consisted of 1328 men and 1478 women. The health examinations were carried out between October and December 2007 according to the WHO MONICA protocol. The assessment of DS was based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, cut-off =10 points). A DSM-IV- criteria based summary score of melancholic items in the BDI was used in dividing the participants with DS (N?=?429) into melancholic (N?=?138) and non-melancholic DS (N?=?291) subgroups. In the statistical analysis we used chi-squared test, t-test, permutation test, analysis of covariance, multivariate logistic regression analysis and multinomial regression model.
The mean vitamin B12 level was 331±176 pmol/L in those without DS while the subjects with non-melancholic DS had a mean vitamin B12 level of 324 ± 135 pmol/L, and those with melancholic DS had the lowest mean vitamin B12 level of 292±112 pmol/L (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
23705786 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood central nervous system infections and risk for schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30483
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2004 Feb;254(1):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Hannu Koponen
Paula Rantakallio
Juha Veijola
Peter Jones
Jari Jokelainen
Matti Isohanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. hannu.koponen@oulu.fi
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2004 Feb;254(1):9-13
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Central Nervous System Infections - complications - epidemiology - virology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Abstract
Central nervous system (CNS) viral infections have been suggested to increase the risk of schizophrenia, although most of the evidence is indirect and comes from rather few studies on exposure to various infections in general. In the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort the association between schizophrenia and other psychoses and childhood CNS infections has been analysed, and in this paper we present the follow-up results up to the end of 1994 and 1997.Data regarding the infections were collected prospectively between 1966-1980 and data on psychoses from 1982. The registered psychiatric diagnoses were validated using the DSM-III-R classification. Out of the 11017 subjects (96% of all births in that year) 145 had suffered a CNS infection during childhood, which in 102 cases was a viral infection. In the follow-up to the end of 1994, 76 had schizophrenia, and their number increased to 100 to the end of 1997. In addition, up to the end of 1994, 52 patients had a non-schizophrenic psychosis. Four cases in the schizophrenia patient group and none of the patients with other psychosis had suffered a viral CNS infection. None of the schizophrenia cases and two of the patients with other psychosis had had a bacterial infection. The adjusted odds ratio for schizophrenia after a viral CNS infection was 4.8 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.6-14.0) in the follow-up to the end of 1994 and 2.5 (0.9-7.0) in the follow-up to the end of 1997. The clinical course variables did not differ between the schizophrenia patients with or without CNS infection. Our results suggest that viral CNS infections during childhood may have a role as a risk factor for schizophrenia. Their role may be modest at the population level due to their relative rareness.
PubMed ID
14991373 View in PubMed
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Cost-utility analysis of vortioxetine versus agomelatine, bupropion SR, sertraline and venlafaxine XR after treatment switch in major depressive disorder in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284758
Source
Expert Rev Pharmacoecon Outcomes Res. 2017 Jun;17(3):293-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Erkki Soini
Taru Hallinen
Mélanie Brignone
Rosanne Campbell
Françoise Diamand
Sandrine Cure
Maria Aalto-Setälä
Natalya Danchenko
Hannu Koponen
Katarzyna Kolasa
Source
Expert Rev Pharmacoecon Outcomes Res. 2017 Jun;17(3):293-302
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetamides - administration & dosage - economics
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - economics
Bupropion - administration & dosage - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Decision Trees
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - economics
Finland
Humans
Markov Chains
Models, Theoretical
Piperazines - administration & dosage - economics
Recurrence
Sertraline - administration & dosage - economics
Sulfides - administration & dosage - economics
Treatment Outcome
Venlafaxine Hydrochloride - administration & dosage - economics
Abstract
To assess the cost-utility of vortioxetine versus relevant comparators (agomelatine, bupropion SR, sertraline, and venlafaxine XR) in the finnish setting in major depressive disorder (MDD) patients with inadequate response to selective serotonin- /serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.
A one-year analysis was conducted using a decision tree with a Markov state transition component. The health states were remission, relapse and recovery. A Finnish healthcare payer perspective was adopted.
Vortioxetine was less costly and more effective versus all comparators in both direct and societal perspectives. Vortioxetine reduced the average annual direct costs by 4% versus venlafaxine XR and 8% versus sertraline. The greater efficacy associated with vortioxetine was translated into a higher percentage of patients in remission and recovery. The model was most sensitive to changes in remission rates at 8 weeks.
This cost-utility analysis showed vortioxetine to be a good alternative for MDD patients switching therapy in Finland.
PubMed ID
27680105 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depressive symptomatology is associated with decreased interleukin-1 beta and increased interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels in males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151688
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2009 May 15;167(1-2):73-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2009
Author
Yrjö Ovaskainen
Hannu Koponen
Jari Jokelainen
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Esko Kumpusalo
Mauno Vanhala
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, South-Savo Hospital District, Moisio Hospital, FIN-50520 Mikkeli, Finland.
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2009 May 15;167(1-2):73-9
Date
May-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Depressive Disorder - blood - diagnosis - immunology
Female
Finland
Humans
Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein - blood - immunology
Interleukin-1 - blood
Interleukin-1beta - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
Previous studies with selected patient populations have suggested that cytokines, the immune system messengers, may play a role in the aetiology of depression. However, the data concerning the increase or decrease of the plasma cytokine levels in depression is controversial and the effects of the medications and type of depression are largely unknown. We studied the connections between plasma interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) levels, and depressive symptomatology measured with the Beck Depression. Inventory in a large, middle-aged population-based sample collected from Central Finland. In addition, the effects of various medications and type of depressive symptomatology on the cytokine levels were scrutinized. In the whole study population, IL-1RA levels were higher in the subgroup with depressive symptomatology. In the males with depressive symptomatology, higher IL-1RA levels and lower interleukin-1 beta levels were observed as compared with the non-depressed males. The IL-1RA/IL-1 beta ratio was significantly higher in males with depressive symptomatology. The IL-1RA levels were also higher and IL-1 beta levels lower in the depressed females, but the trend was not significant. The elevated IL-1RA-levels and IL-1RA/IL-1 beta ratio suggest a role for cytokines in the pathogenesis of depression. The higher IL-1RA levels may reflect an endogenous repairing process against depression.
PubMed ID
19346005 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depressive symptoms and 10-year risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142136
Source
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;11(6):834-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Hannu Koponen
Jari Jokelainen
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Mauno Vanhala
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. hannujuhani.koponen@uku.fi
Source
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;11(6):834-9
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Depression is associated with increased physical morbidity and overall mortality. As less is known about how much depression increases the 10-year risk for fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular (CV) events, we evaluated the cross-sectional risk with two well-characterized risk functions measuring CV mortality and total CV event risk.
The prevalence of increased depressive symptoms was measured with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the SCORE and Framingham risk functions were calculated in a middle-aged population-based sample (N=923). For metabolic syndrome (MetS), the modified National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria were employed.
Depressive symptoms were associated with increased CV mortality and morbidity risk in men: OR for SCORE 2.9; 95%CI 1.4-5.7 and OR for Framingham function 2.2 (95%CI 1.1-4.2). In women, the corresponding figures were 1.4 (95%CI 0.3-6.9) and 1.3 (95%CI 0.7-2.6). The BDI scores showed significant correlations with SCORE (r=0.18 for men, P
PubMed ID
20632843 View in PubMed
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