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Association between acid fumes in the work environment and dental erosion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230052
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1989 Oct;15(5):335-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
M. Tuominen
R. Tuominen
K. Ranta
H. Ranta
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1989 Oct;15(5):335-8
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Sulfuric Acids - adverse effects
Tooth Erosion - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
The effect of inorganic acid fumes from the work environment on the erosion of teeth was studied blindly. A sample of 186 workers was drawn from four factories. Among the 157 dentulous participants, 76 were working in departments containing acid fumes, and 81 had never worked under such conditions and were used as referents. Of the acid workers 18.4% had one or more teeth with erosion, and the corresponding figure for the referents was 8.6%. With a longer duration of exposure the proportion of subjects with erosion increased. The acid workers had more teeth with erosion than the referents, especially upper anterior teeth. The findings suggest that even today exposure to inorganic acid fumes from the work environment may increase the erosion of teeth, especially the upper anterior teeth, which are not continuously protected by saliva and the lips.
PubMed ID
2799320 View in PubMed
Less detail

Identification of victims from the M/S Estonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194659
Source
Int J Legal Med. 2001;114(4-5):259-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
H. Soomer
H. Ranta
A. Penttilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tartu, L. Puusepa Street 8, Tartu, Estonia.
Source
Int J Legal Med. 2001;114(4-5):259-62
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Dental Records
Disasters
Estonia
Female
Finland
Forensic Anthropology - methods
Forensic Dentistry - methods
Humans
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Radiography, Bitewing
Radiography, Panoramic
Ships
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
With 852 victims from 17 different countries, the sinking of the Estonia was Europe's most severe passenger ferry disaster. The Finnish Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) team identified all 93 victims recovered from the sea within 33 days of the accident as well as victim number 94 found 18 months later. Dental identification was established in 57 cases (60%).
PubMed ID
11355406 View in PubMed
Less detail

International collaboration in mass disasters involving foreign nationals within the EU: medico-legal investigation of Finnish victims of the Milan Linate airport SAS SK 686 aircraft accident on 8 October 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184770
Source
Int J Legal Med. 2003 Aug;117(4):204-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
P. Lunetta
H. Ranta
C. Cattaneo
A. Piccinini
R. Niskanen
A. Sajantila
A. Penttilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Helsinki, Kytösuontie 11, PO Box 40, 00300, Helsinki, Finland. philippe.lunetta@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Legal Med. 2003 Aug;117(4):204-10
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation
Autopsy - legislation & jurisprudence
Cause of Death
Coroners and Medical Examiners - legislation & jurisprudence
Disasters
Finland - ethnology
Forensic Medicine - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
International Cooperation
Italy
Abstract
Identification of and investigation into the cause of death of foreign nationals in mass disasters are generally conducted according to the jurisdiction of the country in which the disaster occurs. However, such identification can be achieved only through co-operation with the authorities of the victims' countries of residence. On October 8th 2001 at Linate airport in Milan, Italy, an MD87 SAS airplane with 110 crew members and passengers on board collided on the ground with a Cessna Citation II jet with 2 pilots and 2 passengers. The plane then caught fire after having crashed into an airport baggage hangar causing the death of 4 other victims among the groundstaff. The accident claimed a total of 118 victims of 9 nationalities. Based on our experience from investigation of the Finnish victims, we explore how current national legislations of the EU member states and varying compliance with existing recommendations may influence the medico-legal investigation of a mass disaster. Legislative measures and further harmonisation of medico-legal procedures in connection with mass disasters within the EU are needed.
PubMed ID
12827377 View in PubMed
Less detail

Relationships between the fluoride and magnesium concentrations in drinking water and some components in serum related to cardiovascular diseases in men from four rural districts in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254221
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1973 Nov;32(3):217-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1973