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A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
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[A continuing dental education study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243606
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1982;78(5-6):238-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982

Age and condition of toothbrushes in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249853
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1977 Jun;73(3):133-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1977
Author
H. Murtomaa
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1977 Jun;73(3):133-7
Date
Jun-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
Toothbrushing
PubMed ID
896734 View in PubMed
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Age and maintenance of removable dentures in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224270
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1992 Mar;19(2):123-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
H. Murtomaa
M. Könönen
P. Laine
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1992 Mar;19(2):123-8
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Dental Care
Dental Technicians
Dentists
Denture Design
Denture Rebasing
Denture Repair
Denture Retention
Denture, Complete
Denture, Partial, Removable
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Time Factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
The age and maintenance of dentures, and denture-cleaning habits, were studied by an interview survey. The material represented nation-wide the Finnish population aged greater than or equal to 15 years old, and there were 957 interviewees, of whom 328 were denture wearers. In total, 45% of the upper and 40% of the lower dentures were over 10 years old. More than one-third of the dentures more than 5 years old had never been maintained during that time. Individuals whose dentures had been made and fitted by dental technicians visited dentists less frequently than individuals whose dentures had been made by dentists. Over 80% of the denture wearers reported cleaning their dentures by brushing at least once a day, and women cleaned them more frequently than men. The present findings suggest that denture wearers should be a special target group for dental health education, for the development of the latter, and for the development of dental health care services in the future.
PubMed ID
1517873 View in PubMed
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Assessment of periodontal treatment needs among adults with diabetes in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190191
Source
Int Dent J. 2002 Apr;52(2):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
A. Karikoski
H. Murtomaa
P. Ilanne-Parikka
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Public Health, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int Dent J. 2002 Apr;52(2):75-80
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Calculus - classification
Dental Plaque Index
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Gingival Hemorrhage - classification
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - classification
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
People with diabetes have a high risk for periodontal disease, which can be considered one of the complications of diabetes. We evaluated periodontal treatment needs using the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) in relation to diabetes-related factors and oral hygiene.
The sample consisted of 120 dentate diabetics, all of whom were regular patients at the Salo Regional Hospital Diabetes Clinic. The nurses, who interviewed the patients, collected data on duration and type of diabetes, complications, and HbA1c level. Clinical periodontal examination included identification of visible plaque, the presence of calculus and use of the CPITN.
The CPITN score 3 was the most prevalent. According to the logistic regression model, poor metabolic control was significantly related to pathologic pockets. No significant association was found between diabetes-related factors and the highest individual CPITN score of 4, which was, in turn, significantly associated with extensive calculus.
Excessive periodontal treatment needs found, indicate that current dental care may be insufficient in adults with diabetes. Oral health among high-risk groups, especially those with poor metabolic control, should be promoted by collaboration between dental and health care professionals involved in diabetes care.
PubMed ID
12013254 View in PubMed
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The attitudes of Finnish dentists in private practice towards dental health education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232088
Source
Community Dent Health. 1988 Dec;5(4):369-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1988

Burnout and its causes in Finnish dentists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228607
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Aug;18(4):208-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
H. Murtomaa
E. Haavio-Mannila
I. Kandolin
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Aug;18(4):208-12
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - etiology
Dental Care
Dental Staff
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists
Family
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Human Engineering
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Abstract
In the spring of 1986 burnout and its relation to social and physical environments and the nature of work were studied using a questionnaire sent to a sample of 232 dentists aged under 62 living in the province of Uusimaa, Finland. Most male and female dentists (71 and 67%, respectively) were working in group practices and most (88%) employed an assistant. Professional problems were generally (71%) solved by consulting colleagues. Half of those responding were very satisfied with their relationship to other dental staff. All but 9% of dentists experienced problems in their physical working environments and 22% felt that their uncomfortable working posture interfered significantly with job satisfaction. Women reported chronic work-related conditions diagnosed by a physician more often than men (21 vs. 10%, respectively). At the time of the study, most dentists were experiencing pain in connection with work on patients and 41% of women and 59% of men were experiencing occupational stress. Most dentists experienced at least temporary psychological fatigue as a result of their work and almost half were exhausted at the end of each day. Despite this, most enjoyed working with patients and were enthusiastic about their work. Three aspects of burnout emerged on factor analysis: psychological fatigue, loss of enjoyment of work, and hardening. One third of dentists experienced some hardening and ceased to care greatly what happened to some of their patients. Of the factors associated with working environments, only dissatisfaction with relationships with patients, problems relating to the physical environment and poor working posture significantly increased burnout.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2387138 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the clinical status of third molars in young men in 1949 and in 1990.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219701
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1993 Dec;76(6):694-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
A. Rajasuo
H. Murtomaa
J H Meurman
Author Affiliation
Valkeala Military Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1993 Dec;76(6):694-8
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Finland
Humans
Male
Mandible
Maxilla
Military Personnel
Molar, Third - growth & development
Tooth Eruption
Abstract
We investigated the clinical status of third molars in 876 Finnish conscripts aged 19.9 years (SD, 1.1 years) and compared the findings with data on male students of the same age from 40 years before. Significantly more partially erupted and fewer totally erupted lower third molars were found in the present study than 40 years earlier: 29% (95% confidence interval +/- 3%) versus 19% were partially erupted (p > 0.001), and 13% (confidence interval +/- 3%) versus 23% were totally erupted (p
PubMed ID
8284072 View in PubMed
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Conceptions of dental amalgam and oral health aspects during pregnancy in Finnish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225343
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1991 Dec;99(6):522-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
H. Murtomaa
T. Holttinen
J H Meurman
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1991 Dec;99(6):522-6
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Composite Resins
Dental Amalgam
Dental Care
Dental Porcelain
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Female
Finland
Gold Alloys
Health Education, Dental
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Oral Health
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Abstract
All 277 pregnant women (mean age 28.4 yr, SD 4.6) living at the Lohja municipal health center area in Southern Finland participated in a survey during the first 6 months in 1990. The women's own opinions of the effect of pregnancy on their oral health were questioned during their first trimester of gestation. A special emphasis was put on the attitudes of dental restorative materials. The results showed that 57% of the subjects would have accepted the use of any restorative material during pregnancy while 43% were against one or more materials. 77 (65%) were opposing dental amalgam. 129 women (47%) were of the opinion that pregnancy as such is detrimental to their dental health. This opinion was significantly more frequent among women who were pregnant for third or more times than those having their first gestation. 70 (26%) thought dental treatment to have an effect on their gestation. Also 70 subjects (26%) thought that dental treatment may affect normal development of the fetus. The results showed that in spite of the long tradition in maternity counseling in Finland, the conceptions among pregnant women are often erroneous from the dental point of view.
PubMed ID
1763288 View in PubMed
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Conceptions of Finnish people about the etiology and prevention of dental caries and periodontal disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249969
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1977 May;5(3):108-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1977
Author
J. Markkula
H. Murtomaa
J. Ainamo
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1977 May;5(3):108-15
Date
May-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Dental caries - etiology - prevention & control
Dental Health Surveys
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Rural Population
Toothbrushing
Urban Population
Abstract
Conceptions among the general public in Finland regarding the etiology and prevention of dental caries and periodontal disorders were surveyed in two interviews in 1971 and 1972. Both population samples interviewed comprised about 1,000 people aged 15 years and over. Inadequate oral hygiene was the most common (65%) possible cause chosen by the subjects among the causes of dental caries. Only 44% of the interviewees considered sugar to be a cause of cariers. Thorough cleaning of the teeth (83%) and dentist's check-ups twice a year (67%) were the factors most frequently chosen in caries prevention. Avoidance of sugar (56%) ranked as the third in frequency. As regards symptoms of periodontal disorders, tender gingiva, gingival bleeding, and loosening of the teeth were correctly suggested as symptoms by 62, 61 and 45%, respectively. Poor oral hygiene (77%) was the cause of gingivitis most commonly chosen by the interviewees, while simultaneous systemic disease (37%) was considered more important than, for example, dental calculus (31%). As regards treatment of periodontal disorders, careful toothcleaning (73%) received most support. However, this factor was closely followed by misconceptions regarding the supposed advantageous value of drug and rinses (50%), chewing of fibrous foods (45%), and vitamin therapy (38%).
PubMed ID
266430 View in PubMed
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83 records – page 1 of 9.