Skip header and navigation

Refine By

21 records – page 1 of 3.

The aetiology and epidemiology of clavicular fractures. A prospective study during a two-year period in Uppsala, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52492
Source
Injury. 2000 Jun;31(5):353-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
J. Nowak
H. Mallmin
S. Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-751 85, Uppsala, Sweden. jan.nowak@ortopedi.uu.se
Source
Injury. 2000 Jun;31(5):353-8
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clavicle - injuries
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a prospective study, the age- and gender-specific incidence and features of clavicular fractures were studied during 1989 and 1990. The population at risk consisted of about 200,000 individuals aged 15 or above in the county of Uppsala, Sweden. There were 187 clavicular fractures in 185 patients corresponding to an annual incidence of 50/100,000 (males 71/100,000, women 30/100,000). Males were significantly younger and sustained comminuted fractures more often than women. The fracture incidence decreased with age in both genders, although the reduction was significant only in men. Bicycle accidents most frequently caused clavicular fractures in both genders, whereas sports activities were significantly more common in men. Right and left clavicles were almost as frequently fractured, and a direct fall on the shoulder was the most frequent mechanism of injury for both genders. There was no difference between genders in the anatomical location with about three of four fractures occurring through the middle part and one of four through the acromial part of the clavicle. Ninety-five percent healed uneventfully, while non-union developed in 5% - evenly distributed between the middle part of the clavicle and the acromial part.
PubMed ID
10775691 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bone mineral density in femoral neck is positively correlated to circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190890
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
P. Gillberg
H. Olofsson
H. Mallmin
W F Blum
S. Ljunghall
A G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density
Femur Neck - metabolism - radiography
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Lumbar Vertebrae - metabolism - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Studies on the hormonal regulation of bone metabolism in men have indicated covariation between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and sex hormones with bone mineral density (BMD). In this study the relationships between BMD in total body, lumbar spine, femoral neck, distal and ultradistal (UD) radius and circulating levels of IGFs, IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), and sex steroids were investigated in 55 Swedish men between 22 and 85 (52 +/- 18, mean +/- SD) years of age. BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck was positively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = 0.31 to 0.49), IGF-II (r = 0.32 to 0.48), IGFBP-3 (r = 0.37 to 0.53), and free androgen index (FAI) (r = 0.32 to 0.40), and negatively with IGFBP-1 (r = -0.37 to -0.41) and IGFBP-2 (r = -0.29 to -0.41) levels. A positive correlation was observed between BMD in femoral neck and estradiol/SHBG ratio (r = 0.34, P = 0.01). Age correlated negatively with serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, FAI, estradiol/SHBG ratio, and BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck, and positively with IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, and SHBG levels. According to stepwise multiple regression analyses, a combination of weight, IGFBP-3, and testosterone accounted for 43% of the variation in BMD in femoral neck, 34% in ultradistal radius and 48% in total body (P
PubMed ID
11907704 View in PubMed
Less detail

Calcium intake among women aged 40-76 in Sweden. Study Group MRS SWEA. Multiple Risk Survey on Swedish Women for Eating Assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61972
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1996 Oct;50(5):577-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
K. Michaëlsson
R. Bergström
L. Holmberg
H. Mallmin
A. Wolk
S. Ljunghall
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1996 Oct;50(5):577-8
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
PubMed ID
8944868 View in PubMed
Less detail

Colles' fracture associated with reduced bone mineral content. Photon densitometry in 74 patients with matched controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222973
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1992 Oct;63(5):552-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
H. Mallmin
S. Ljunghall
T. Naessén
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1992 Oct;63(5):552-4
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Age Factors
Aged
Bone Density
Colles' Fracture - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Osteoporosis - complications - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a prospective population-based investigation, we measured bone mineral density (BMD) of the forearm using single-photon absorptiometry at both a distal and a more proximal site in 74 Colles'-fracture patients who were compared with controls matched for age, sex, and years after menopause. For both groups there was a marked inverse relationship between age and bone mass. However, over the entire age range, the probands had 11 percent reduced BMD when compared with the controls. Our findings confirm that patients with fracture of the distal forearm have reduced BMD. They constitute an appropriate group for studies aimed at prevention of fracture in the elderly.
PubMed ID
1441956 View in PubMed
Less detail

A deletion polymorphism in the RIZ gene, a female sex steroid hormone receptor coactivator, exhibits decreased response to estrogen in vitro and associates with low bone mineral density in young Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177097
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Dec;89(12):6173-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
E. Grundberg
T. Carling
H. Brändström
S. Huang
E L Ribom
O. Ljunggren
H. Mallmin
A. Kindmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. elin.grundberg@medsci.uu.se
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Dec;89(12):6173-8
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bone Density - genetics
Cohort Studies
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics
Estrogen Receptor alpha - metabolism
Female
Gene Deletion
Genotype
Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase
Humans
Nuclear Proteins - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Random Allocation
Sweden
Transcription Factors - genetics
Abstract
Low bone mineral density (BMD) is a major risk factor for osteoporotic fracture, and the trait is under genetic control by a large number of genes. It is recognized that estrogen plays an important role in the maintenance of bone mass by binding to estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). RIZ1 has previously been shown to be a specific ERalpha coactivator and strongly enhances its function both in vivo and in vitro. We performed in vitro studies comparing the abilities of RIZ1 P704 polymorphic variants (homozygous presence, P704+; absence, P704-; heterozygosity P704(+/-) of a proline at position 704) to coactivate the ERalpha and also examined the polymorphism associated to BMD of 343 Swedish women, aged 20-39 yr. The expression vector containing P704- RIZ1 showed an impaired response in coactivating ERalpha in a ligand- and dose-dependent manner compared with P704+ RIZ (P
PubMed ID
15579774 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diet and hip fracture risk: a case-control study. Study Group of the Multiple Risk Survey on Swedish Women for Eating Assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48369
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1995 Aug;24(4):771-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
K. Michaëlsson
L. Holmberg
H. Mallmin
S. Sörensen
A. Wolk
R. Bergström
S. Ljunghall
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1995 Aug;24(4):771-82
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Diet
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Iron - administration & dosage
Magnesium - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND. The role of diet as a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures is unclear. Earlier studies have yielded conflicting results. METHODS. In two counties in central Sweden we investigated the association between dietary intake and the risk of proximal femoral fractures in a case-control study nested in a cohort. Women born in 1914-1948 were asked to fill out a food frequency questionnaire when invited to attend for mammographic screening between the years 1987 and 1990. More than 65,000 women completed the questionnaire. Those who had participated in the enquiry and subsequently sustained a first hip fracture were defined as cases. For every case, four individually matched controls, by age and county of residence, were selected from the cohort. A second questionnaire concerning confounding factors was mailed to controls and cases. In all, 247 cases and 893 controls could finally be included. Monthly intake of foods and daily intake of nutrients were calculated. RESULTS. When highest quartile of intake was compared to lowest, intakes of iron (adjusted odds ratio [OR] of 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-6.9), magnesium (adjusted OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.3-6.0) and vitamin C (adjusted OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2-3.1) were found to be independent risk factors for hip fracture. High calcium intake did not protect against hip fracture. Smoking, low physical activity in leisure time, low body mass index, earlier fracture of the distal forearm and diabetes were all risk factors while postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy protected against hip fracture. DISCUSSION. This large study indicates new dietary risk factors for hip fracture. The association between high dietary intake of iron, magnesium and vitamin C and risk of hip fracture has not been reported previously. Further clinical and experimental studies are needed to confirm these findings and to investigate their mechanism of action.
PubMed ID
8550275 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diet, bone mass, and osteocalcin: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62031
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 1995 Aug;57(2):86-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
K. Michaëlsson
L. Holmberg
H. Mallmin
A. Wolk
R. Bergström
S. Ljunghall
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 1995 Aug;57(2):86-93
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Bone Density
Calcium, dietary
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Energy intake
Female
Femur
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Osteocalcin - blood
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spine
Abstract
To determine the relationships among nutrients intake, bone mass, and bone turnover in women we have investigated these issues in a population-based, cross-sectional, observational study in one county in central Sweden. A total of 175 women aged 28-74 at entry to the study were included. Dietary assessment was made by both a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire and by four 1-week dietary records. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed at five sites: total body, L2-L4 region of the lumbar spine, and three regions of the proximal femur. Serum concentrations of osteocalcin (an osteoblast-specific protein reflecting bone turnover) were measured by a radioimmunoassay. Linear regression models, with adjustment for possible confounding factors were used for statistical analyses. A weak positive association was found between dietary calcium intake as calculated from the semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire and total body bone mineral density (BMD) among premenopausal women. No association emerged between dietary calcium intake and site-specific bone mass, i.e., lumbar spine and femoral neck, nor was an association found between dietary calcium intake and serum osteocalcin. BMD at some of the measured sites was positively associated with protein and carbohydrates and negatively associated with dietary fat. In no previous studies of diet and bone mass have dietary habits been ascertained so carefully and the results adjusted for possible confounding factors. Neither of the two methods of dietary assessment used in this study revealed any effect of calcium intake on BMD at fracture-relevant sites among these healthy, mostly middle-aged women.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7584880 View in PubMed
Less detail

Distal radius fracture is an early sign of general osteoporosis: bone mass measurements in a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217079
Source
Osteoporos Int. 1994 Nov;4(6):357-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
H. Mallmin
S. Ljunghall
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 1994 Nov;4(6):357-61
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Bone Density
Case-Control Studies
Colles' Fracture - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - complications - diagnosis
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate the bone mass by bone density measurements in patients with distal radius fracture, a prospective open case-control study was carried out in the county of Uppsala, Sweden, with population-based cases and controls. There were 111 patients with a distal radius fracture who were otherwise healthy and aged 53-76 years, together with 60 healthy controls of similar age, sex and menopausal status. The main outcome measures were bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and hip measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and in the (non-fractured) distal forearm determined by single-photon absorptiometry. It was found that at all measuring sites BMD was significantly lower in cases than in controls. The difference in the distal forearm was around 20% (p
PubMed ID
7696833 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of prefracture versus postfracture dietary assessment on hip fracture risk estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61995
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Apr;25(2):403-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
K. Michaelsson
L. Holmberg
S. Ljunghall
H. Mallmin
P G Persson
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Central Hospital, 721 89 Vasteras, Sweden. The Study Group of the Multiple Risk Survey on Swedish Women for eating Assessment (MRS SWEA).
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Apr;25(2):403-10
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Dietary factors are presumed to have influence on bone mass and hence fracture susceptibility. Most information in this respect is based on retrospective assessment of previous dietary habits. In a population-based case-control study nested within a cohort, we collected dietary information both before and after a first hip fracture. Thus it was possible to study reported changes in dietary habits, intentional as well as unintentional, among hip fracture patients after a first hip fracture and to compare postfracture with prefracture dietary information. METHODS. More than 65 000 women born 1914-1948 in two counties in central Sweden completed a food frequency questionnaire regarding their usual current dietary habits, before attending a mammographic screening between the years 1987 and 1990. Subsequently 123 of them sustained a first hip fracture and were defined as cases in the present study. For every case, one control, individually matched by age and county of residence, was selected from the cohort. A second identical food frequency questionnaire was mailed to both cases and controls on average 2 years after the hip fracture event. In total 98 case/control pairs could be included in the analysis. The association between diet and hip fracture was evaluated and the results from the two dietary assessments were contrasted. Women who themselves claimed that they had not changed their diet in recent years were analysed separately. RESULTS. The hip fracture cases, compared with the controls, had reduced their reported dietary intake of dairy products after the fracture. Apparently this was not intentional since this effect was more pronounced among those cases who claimed that their diet was unchanged. The changes were most apparent among the younger cases with a more recent hip fracture and with a body mass index above the median. Half of the cases, more than twice the frequency in controls, who were initially classified as having high intake of dairy products were classified as having low intake (
PubMed ID
9119567 View in PubMed
Less detail

Excessive dietary intake of vitamin A is associated with reduced bone mineral density and increased risk for hip fracture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61869
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1998 Nov 15;129(10):770-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1998
Author
H. Melhus
K. Michaëlsson
A. Kindmark
R. Bergström
L. Holmberg
H. Mallmin
A. Wolk
S. Ljunghall
Author Affiliation
University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Hakan.Melhus@medicin.uu.se
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1998 Nov 15;129(10):770-8
Date
Nov-15-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bone Density - drug effects
Case-Control Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Female
Food Habits
Hip Fractures - etiology
Humans
Linear Models
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Osteoporosis - complications - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Vitamin A - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The highest incidence of osteoporotic fractures is found in northern Europe, where dietary intake of vitamin A (retinol) is unusually high. In animals, the most common adverse effect of toxic doses of retinol is spontaneous fracture. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether excessive dietary intake of vitamin A is associated with decreased bone mineral density and increased risk for hip fracture. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study and a nested case-control study. SETTING: Two counties in central Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: For the cross-sectional study, 175 women 28 to 74 years of age were randomly selected. For the nested case-control study, 247 women who had a first hip fracture within 2 to 64 months after enrollment and 873 age-matched controls were selected from a mammography study cohort of 66,651 women 40 to 76 years of age. MEASUREMENTS: Retinol intake was estimated from dietary records and a food-frequency questionnaire. Bone mineral density was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Hip fracture was identified by using hospital discharge records and was confirmed by record review. RESULTS: In multivariate analysis, retinol intake was negatively associated with bone mineral density. For every 1-mg increase in daily intake of retinol, risk for hip fracture increased by 68% (95% CI, 18% to 140%; P for trend, 0.006). For intake greater than 1.5 mg/d compared with intake less than 0.5 mg/d, bone mineral density was reduced by 10% at the femoral neck (P = 0.05), 14% at the lumbar spine (P = 0.001), and 6% for the total body (P = 0.009) and risk for hip fracture was doubled (odds ratio, 2.1 [CI, 1.1 to 4.0]). CONCLUSION: High dietary intake of retinol seems to be associated with osteoporosis.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Intern Med. 1999 Sep 7;131(5):39210475894
PubMed ID
9841582 View in PubMed
Less detail

21 records – page 1 of 3.