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10 records – page 1 of 1.

A clinic to Tyonek or socialism revisited october 17-18, 1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110203
Source
Alaska Med. 1969 Mar;11(1):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1969
Author
M H Fritz
Source
Alaska Med. 1969 Mar;11(1):29-34
Date
Mar-1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Community Health Services
Humans
Ophthalmology
Otolaryngology
PubMed ID
5769609 View in PubMed
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Cryptosporidium and Giardia in marine-foraging river otters (Lontra canadensis) from the Puget Sound Georgia Basin ecosystem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164131
Source
J Parasitol. 2007 Feb;93(1):198-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
J K Gaydos
W A Miller
K V K Gilardi
A. Melli
H. Schwantje
C. Engelstoft
H. Fritz
P A Conrad
Author Affiliation
Orcas Island Office, University of California-Davis Wildlife Health Center, 1016 Deer Harbor Road, Eastsound, Washington 98245, USA. jkgaydos@ucdavis.edu
Source
J Parasitol. 2007 Feb;93(1):198-202
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Cryptosporidium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Ecosystem
Feces - parasitology
Genotype
Giardia - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Giardiasis - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Humans
Otters - parasitology
Risk factors
Washington - epidemiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
Species of Cryptosporidium and Giardia can infect humans and wildlife and have the potential to be transmitted between these 2 groups; yet, very little is known about these protozoans in marine wildlife. Feces of river otters (Lontra canadensis), a common marine wildlife species in the Puget Sound Georgia Basin, were examined for species of Cryptosporidium and Giardia to determine their role in the epidemiology of these pathogens. Using ZnSO4 flotation and immunomagnetic separation, followed by direct immunofluorescent antibody detection (IMS/DFA), we identified Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts in 9 fecal samples from 6 locations and Giardia sp. cysts in 11 fecal samples from 7 locations. The putative risk factors of proximate human population and degree of anthropogenic shoreline modification were not associated with the detection of Cryptosporidium or Giardia spp. in river otter feces. Amplification of DNA from the IMS/DFA slide scrapings was successful for 1 sample containing > 500 Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts. Sequences from the Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA and the COWP loci were most similar to the ferret Cryptosporidium sp. genotype. River otters could serve as reservoirs for Cryptosporidium and Giardia species in marine ecosystems. More work is needed to better understand the zoonotic potential of the genotypes they carry as well as their implications for river otter health.
PubMed ID
17436965 View in PubMed
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The eye and adnexal disease of the Alaska native-1970.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4308
Source
Alaska Med. 1970 Sep;12(3):70-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1970

Health control of four-year-old children. A study of bacteriuria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43617
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1972 May;61(3):289-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1972

[Postoperative wound infections in orthopedic surgery. The "incidence of infection" is underestimated].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217948
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jun 22;91(25):2504-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-1994
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1971 Jul;13(3):86-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1971
Author
M H Fritz
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1971 Jul;13(3):86-8
Date
Jul-1971
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Child
Community Health Services
Ear Diseases - diagnosis - surgery
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Vision Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
St. Mary's
Medical missions
Health services
Otitis media
Refractive error
Mastoidectomy
Boarding school
Adenotonsillectomy
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 688.
PubMed ID
5562703 View in PubMed
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Susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics and gentamicin of gram-negative bacilli isolated from hospitalized patients: a Swedish multicenter study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234137
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1988;20(6):641-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
K. Dornbusch
S. Bengtsson
J E Brorson
H. Fritz
C. Henning
G. Kronvall
P. Larsson
A S Malmborg
M. Thore
A. Tärnvik
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1988;20(6):641-7
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ampicillin - pharmacology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacteriuria - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Gentamicins - pharmacology
Gram-Negative Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Humans
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Sepsis - microbiology
Sweden
Abstract
A total of 952 blood and 1543 urine isolates of gram-negative bacilli from hospitalized patients in 1986-1987 were consecutively collected by 10 Swedish laboratories and tested for susceptibility to 8 beta-lactam antibiotics and to gentamicin. The isolates were mostly Escherichia coli (58% and 44%, respectively) and Klebsiella sp. (17% and 18%). Resistance to ampicillin in blood and urine isolates was found in 35% and 45%, respectively, to piperacillin in 5% and 6%, to cephalothin in 26% and 34%, to cefuroxime in 12% and 22%, to cefotaxime in 3% and 5%, to ceftazidime in 1% and 1%, to imipenem in 0.5% and 0.1%, to aztreonam in 3% and 2%, and to gentamicin in 0.8% and 0%. Resistance of clinically important gram-negative bacilli to new beta-lactam antibiotics and to gentamicin is infrequent in Sweden.
PubMed ID
3065931 View in PubMed
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[The first fatal Swedish case report of dog bite contaminated by a new bacterium].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237169
Source
Lakartidningen. 1986 Apr 9;83(15):1387-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-9-1986

A voyage on the Yukon and its tributaries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300687
Source
The Alaskan Churchman vol 56 n 4 pp 5-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
December 1961
Author
M H Fritz
Source
The Alaskan Churchman vol 56 n 4 pp 5-12
Date
December 1961
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Indigenous Groups
Athabaskan
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
UAA/APU Consortium, Journals 1ST Floor
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10 records – page 1 of 1.