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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Acute sports injuries. Data on leisure accidents and injuries should be collated centrally.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212347
Source
BMJ. 1996 Mar 30;312(7034):844-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-1996
Author
S. O'Driscoll
H. Campbell
Source
BMJ. 1996 Mar 30;312(7034):844-5
Date
Mar-30-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletic Injuries - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Leisure Activities
Notes
Cites: Health Bull (Edinb). 1995 Sep;53(5):280-937490199
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Dec 2;311(7018):1465-88520333
Cites: Lancet. 1995 Jun 10;345(8963):1485-77769905
Cites: Lancet. 1995 Jul 15;346(8968):188-97603258
Comment On: BMJ. 1995 Dec 2;311(7018):1465-88520333
PubMed ID
8608303 View in PubMed
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Association studies on 11 published colorectal cancer risk loci.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142026
Source
Br J Cancer. 2010 Aug 10;103(4):575-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2010
Author
S. von Holst
S. Picelli
D. Edler
C. Lenander
J. Dalén
F. Hjern
N. Lundqvist
U. Lindforss
L. Påhlman
K. Smedh
A. Törnqvist
J. Holm
M. Janson
M. Andersson
S. Ekelund
L. Olsson
S. Ghazi
N. Papadogiannakis
A. Tenesa
S M Farrington
H. Campbell
M G Dunlop
A. Lindblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm S17176, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2010 Aug 10;103(4):575-80
Date
Aug-10-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Loci
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Recently, several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have independently found numerous loci at which common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) modestly influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to test 11 loci, reported to be associated with an increased or decreased risk of colorectal cancer: 8q23.3 (rs16892766), 8q24.21 (rs6983267), 9p24 (rs719725), 10p14 (rs10795668), 11q23.1 (rs3802842), 14q22.2 (rs4444235), 15q13.3 (rs4779584), 16q22.1 (rs9929218), 18q21.1 (rs4939827), 19q13.1 (rs10411210) and 20p12.3 (rs961253), in a Swedish-based cohort.
The cohort was composed of 1786 cases and 1749 controls that were genotyped and analysed statistically. Genotype-phenotype analysis, for all 11 SNPs and sex, age of onset, family history of CRC and tumour location, was performed.
Of eleven loci, 5 showed statistically significant odds ratios similar to previously published findings: 8q23.3, 8q24.21, 10p14, 15q13.3 and 18q21.1. The remaining loci 11q23.1, 16q22.1, 19q13.1 and 20p12.3 showed weak trends but somehow similar to what was previously published. The loci 9p24 and 14q22.2 could not be confirmed. We show a higher number of risk alleles in affected individuals compared to controls. Four statistically significant genotype-phenotype associations were found; the G allele of rs6983267 was associated to older age, the G allele of rs1075668 was associated with a younger age and sporadic cases, and the T allele of rs10411210 was associated with younger age.
Our study, using a Swedish population, supports most genetic variants published in GWAS. More studies are needed to validate the genotype-phenotype correlations.
Notes
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Nov;18(11):3062-719843678
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Feb;18(2):616-2119155440
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2009 Jan;136(1):131-719010329
Cites: Cancer Res. 2008 Dec 1;68(23):9982-619047180
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Dec;40(12):1426-3519011631
Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 2008 Dec 1;17(23):3720-718753146
Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 2008 Sep 1;17(17):2665-7218535017
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 May;40(5):623-3018372905
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 May;40(5):631-718372901
Cites: Cancer Res. 2008 Jan 1;68(1):14-718172290
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Jan;40(1):26-818084292
Cites: Cancer Res. 2007 Dec 1;67(23):11128-3218056436
Cites: Nat Genet. 2007 Nov;39(11):1315-717934461
Cites: Nat Genet. 2007 Aug;39(8):984-817618284
Cites: Nat Genet. 2007 Aug;39(8):989-9417618283
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Cites: Br J Cancer. 2010 Jan 19;102(2):447-5419920828
Cites: Biometrics. 1997 Dec;53(4):1253-619423247
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Jul 13;343(2):78-8510891514
PubMed ID
20648012 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Unio Int Contra Cancrum. 1963;19:1450-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
Author
H. CAMPBELL
Source
Acta Unio Int Contra Cancrum. 1963;19:1450-3
Date
1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
England
Finland
France
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway
Tongue Neoplasms
United States
Wales
PubMed ID
14103971 View in PubMed
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Promoting breastfeeding: a view of the current position and a proposed agenda for action in Scotland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59155
Source
J Public Health Med. 1996 Dec;18(4):406-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
H. Campbell
I. Jones
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh.
Source
J Public Health Med. 1996 Dec;18(4):406-14
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Breast Feeding - ethnology - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Scotland
Abstract
The prevalence of breastfeeding in Scotland is the second lowest in Europe. There is good evidence that breastfeeding results in decreased gastrointestinal, and to a lesser extent respiratory infections, in the first year of life, and reduced serious infections in low-birthweight babies. Published evidence for the effectiveness of interventions which seek to promote successful breastfeeding within populations is scanty and of poor quality, although numerous studies have highlighted hospital practices which discourage and undermine breastfeeding. Changing these poor practices has been shown to be achievable and can lead to improved breastfeeding rates. Experience in other industrialized countries such as Canada, Australia and Norway has shown that substantial increases in breastfeeding are achievable through combined government and health service action over a period of one or two decades. We recommend a combination of government and health service action to promote breastfeeding in Scotland including: implementation of the International Code on Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes; reviews of health professional basic and in-service training in breastfeeding management, maternity leave and allowances, and workplace facilities for breastfeeding mothers; promotion of the Baby Friendly Initiative; development of community support for breastfeeding mothers; routine collection of breastfeeding data to support annual monitoring of breastfeeding rates; and support for research on the effectiveness of strategies which seek to promote breastfeeding.
PubMed ID
9023799 View in PubMed
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SURVIVAL EXPERIENCE OF PATIENTS FROM FIVE COUNTRIES WITH CANCER OF THE TONGUE, AROUND 1950-1954.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28914
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1964 Oct;15:199-215
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1964

6 records – page 1 of 1.