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Breast cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of rural and urban women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223530
Source
Prev Med. 1992 Jul;21(4):405-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1992
Author
H. Bryant
Z. Mah
Author Affiliation
Alberta Program for the Early Detection of Cancer, Alberta Cancer Board, Calgary, Canada.
Source
Prev Med. 1992 Jul;21(4):405-18
Date
Jul-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mammography - economics - statistics & numerical data
Mass Screening - economics - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Women's health
Abstract
This study was carried out to assess the breast cancer knowledge, attitudes, and awareness of women age 40 to 74 in Alberta, a Canadian province of 2.4 million people. This analysis compares the attributes of 538 rural women, defined as those living between 1 and 3 hr drive from the major cities in Alberta, and 735 urban women who lived in one of these two cities. Rural women were found to have the same basic knowledge of breast cancer or perceptions of barriers to mammography, but had more negative attitudes about breast cancer itself. Despite their similar access to physician care, they were less likely to have had a recent clinical breast examination or mammogram (P less than 0.001). These differences remained when adjustment was made for demographic background variables; the adjusted prevalence rate ratio for a screening mammogram in the past 2 years was 0.52 (95% C.I., 0.43, 0.64), and for intention to have a mammogram in the next 2 years, 0.75 (0.63, 0.90). The results suggest particular program delivery strategies when planning for provision of breast screening information and service to the large subgroup of rural women.
PubMed ID
1409484 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening in Canada: climbing the diffusion curve.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210679
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Nov-Dec;87 Suppl 2:S60-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Bryant
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Prevention and Screening, Alberta Cancer Board, Calgary.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Nov-Dec;87 Suppl 2:S60-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Canada
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Mammography
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Research Design
Rural Population
Abstract
Results of breast cancer screening studies, which point to the efficacy of screening mammography in the 50 to 69 year age group, have been available for several years. A number of initiatives are underway in Canada in an attempt to assure that the diffusion for this technology occurs consistently and rapidly. This paper outlines the initiative of the Canadian Workshop Group of Breast Cancer Screening, which convened in 1988, as well as other national initiatives in this area. In addition, it describes the experience of one screening program in assessing and acting upon shortcomings in screening diffusion in its own province. Specifically, the use of letters of invitation, community mobilization, and mobile service delivery are briefly outlined. This illustrates the use of outcome-based research and programmatic service delivery in assisting the diffusion effort.
PubMed ID
9002347 View in PubMed
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Breast implants and breast cancer--reanalysis of a linkage study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214943
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Jun 8;332(23):1535-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-8-1995
Author
H. Bryant
P. Brasher
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Prevention and Screening, Alberta Cancer Board, Calgary, Canada.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Jun 8;332(23):1535-9
Date
Jun-8-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Breast Implants - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mammaplasty
Middle Aged
Probability
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Abstract
In 1992, Berkel and colleagues reported in the Journal the results of their study of the potential association of breast augmentation and breast cancer. The study reported that women who had breast augmentation had a significantly lower subsequent risk of breast cancer (P
PubMed ID
7739707 View in PubMed
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A Canadian experiment with breast cancer information exchange pilot projects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211560
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1996 Jul;28(2):169-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
J. Bradbury
H. Bryant
T. Casebolt
J. Latreille
J. Pawelek
I. Olivotto
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1996 Jul;28(2):169-74
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - psychology
Canada
Female
Financing, Government
Humans
Information Services - organization & administration
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Pilot Projects
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Abstract
Responding to concerns articulated by Canadian women living with breast cancer and their families, the federal government has provided $2.7 million over five years to establish five regional information exchange pilot projects. Women experience considerable variation in access to information reflecting different resources, communication links and health care delivery systems in each province or territory. The five information projects are taking different approaches to enhance coordination of existing resources and involve women living with breast cancer to improve access to credible, timely, breast cancer information.
PubMed ID
8852090 View in PubMed
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Changes in Canadian women's mammography rates since the implementation of mass screening programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201882
Source
Am J Public Health. 1999 Jun;89(6):927-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
C E De Grasse
A M O'Connor
J. Boulet
N. Edwards
H. Bryant
K. Breithaupt
Author Affiliation
Clinical Services, Ottawa Regional Women's Breast Health Centre, Ottawa Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1999 Jun;89(6):927-9
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Mammography - trends - utilization
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Program Evaluation
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Abstract
This study reports on Canadian mammography rates between 1990, when mass screening programs were launched, and 1994/95.
Mammography rates from 2 national surveys were compared according to the presence of a provincial screening program.
Mammography rates among women aged 50 to 69 years (the targeted group) increased significantly, by 16%; increases were twice as high in provinces with screening programs. Among women in their 40s (nontargeted group), the changes were insignificant and independent of screening program status.
Screening programs appear to have influenced the mammography rates of targeted women aged 50 to 69 years.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Jun 15;146(12):2167-741308756
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1997 Mar-Apr;13(2):143-99088452
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Jan 11;273(2):149-547799496
Cites: Prev Med. 1992 Jul;21(4):405-181409484
PubMed ID
10358690 View in PubMed
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Effect of cigarette smoking on recurrence of Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229176
Source
Gastroenterology. 1990 May;98(5 Pt 1):1123-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
L R Sutherland
S. Ramcharan
H. Bryant
G. Fick
Author Affiliation
Division of Gastroenterology, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Gastroenterology. 1990 May;98(5 Pt 1):1123-8
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Reoperation
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
The effect of cigarette smoking on recurrence (defined in this study as the need for repeat surgery) in patients who had previously required surgery for Crohn's disease was assessed in a historical cohort of 174 patients. Mean follow-up was 10.8 yr. The 5- and 10-yr recurrence rates were 28% and 56%, respectively. Five- and 10-yr rates were significantly different for smokers (36%, 70%) and nonsmokers (20%, 41%). When patients were stratified by gender, the increased risk was more apparent in women (odds ratio 4.2, 95% confidence interval 2.0-4.2) than in men (odds ratio 1.5, 95% confidence interval 0.8-6.0). Evidence for a dose-response relationship could be identified in women but not men. Cigarette smoking may not only be a risk factor for development of Crohn's disease but also may influence disease activity following surgery.
PubMed ID
2323505 View in PubMed
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Influenza B outbreak in a nursing home--Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232140
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1988 Nov 26;14(47):213-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-1988
Author
H. Robinson
H. Bryant
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1988 Nov 26;14(47):213-5
Date
Nov-26-1988
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Influenza B virus
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Nursing Homes
PubMed ID
3242903 View in PubMed
Less detail

Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours concerning cancer screening in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209807
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 1997;18(4):176-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
T. Lipskie
L C Gibbons
B. Whylie
H. Bryant
F D Ashbury
Author Affiliation
Cancer Bureau, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 1997;18(4):176-8
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Mass Screening
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Program Evaluation
Abstract
The Advisory Committee on Cancer Control funded a one-day workshop to discuss the surveillance of knowledge, attitudes/beliefs and behaviours concerning early cancer detection in Canada. Participants considered the need for such national surveillance and related methodological issues. Some exploratory work has been conducted in this regard. Results were presented from an inventory of existing survey questions and a summary of established cancer screening guidelines. There was overall agreement on the utility of collecting details of early cancer detection behaviours and their determinants. Explicitly, participants identified a need for site-specific information, highlighting cancers of the prostate and colon/rectum, as well as recognizing a need for qualitative information regarding the determinants that enable early cancer detection behaviours.
PubMed ID
9445366 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84(1):17-8; discussion 21-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Bryant
Author Affiliation
Screen Test: Alberta Program for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer, Calgary.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84(1):17-8; discussion 21-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control - radiography
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Mass Screening - economics
Middle Aged
Palpation
Public Health Administration
Notes
Comment On: Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84(1):14-68500048
PubMed ID
8500049 View in PubMed
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Performance of screening mammography in organized programs in Canada in 1996. The Database Management Subcommittee to the National Committee for the Canadian Breast Cancer Screening Initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196620
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Oct 31;163(9):1133-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-31-2000
Author
D. Paquette
J. Snider
F. Bouchard
I. Olivotto
H. Bryant
K. Decker
G. Doyle
Author Affiliation
Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control (Formerly the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control), Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Oct 31;163(9):1133-8
Date
Oct-31-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Mammography
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Survival Rate
Abstract
The results of randomized trials show that breast cancer screening by mammography reduces breast cancer mortality by up to 40% in women aged 50-69 years. Because of these results, by 1998, 22 countries, including Canada, had established population-based organized screening programs. This paper presents the results of screening mammography in 1996 for 7 provincially organized breast cancer screening programs in Canada.
Analyses of interim performance indicators for screening mammography have been calculated from data submitted to the Canadian Breast Cancer Screening database. The data set consisted of data from 7 provincial programs and was limited to mammographic screens for women aged 50-69 years (n = 203,303). Screening outcomes and performance indicators were calculated for abnormalities detected by screening mammography only.
The abnormal recall rate was 9.5% for first screens and 4.6% for subsequent screens, and the cancer detection rate per 1000 women screened was 6.9 for first screens and 3.8 for subsequent screens. The positive predictive value (i.e., the proportion of women who tested positive by mammography who were found to have breast cancer on screen-initiated diagnostic work-up) increased from 7.2% at the first screen to 8.2% at subsequent screens. Estimated participation rates within organized programs varied from 10.6% to 54.2%, depending on the province.
For 1996, organized breast cancer screening programs met or exceeded many of the interim measures used in international programs. It is possible to translate the benefits of breast cancer screening by mammography, as demonstrated in randomized trials, into population-based community programs. Screening mammography through organized programs should increase to allow more comprehensive monitoring in Canada.
Notes
Cites: Cancer Detect Prev. 1997;21(3):213-209167038
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1998 Mar 2;75(5):694-89495236
Cites: Aust N Z J Surg. 1998 Jun;68(6):415-89623460
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1997;(22):151-69709292
Cites: J Med Screen. 1998;5(2):73-809718525
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1998 Oct;27(5):735-429839727
Cites: Radiology. 1999 May;211(2):529-3310228538
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1999 Mar;54(1):73-8110369083
Cites: Prev Med. 1999 Jul;29(1):22-710419795
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 1999 Oct;8(5):417-2610548397
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1982 Aug;69(2):349-556955542
Cites: Lancet. 1985 Apr 13;1(8433):829-322858707
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1989 Jun;59(6):954-82736233
Cites: Radiol Clin North Am. 1992 Jan;30(1):187-2101732926
Cites: Radiology. 1993 Sep;188(3):811-68351353
Cites: Cancer Detect Prev. 1993;17(4-5):513-208242651
Cites: Radiology. 1994 Nov;193(2):351-77972742
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Jan 11;273(2):149-547799496
Cites: Radiology. 1996 Jan;198(1):125-308539363
Cites: J Med Screen. 1995;2(4):186-908719146
Comment In: CMAJ. 2000 Oct 31;163(9):1150-111079061
PubMed ID
11079057 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.