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Aesthetic concerns of children and parents in relation to different classifications of the Tooth Surface Index of Fluorosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219682
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1993 Dec;21(6):360-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
D C Clark
H J Hann
M F Williamson
J. Berkowitz
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1993 Dec;21(6):360-4
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Esthetics, Dental
Fluoridation
Fluorosis, Dental - classification - psychology
Humans
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Increasing prevalence of dental fluorosis for children both from fluoridated and non-fluoridated communities are now well documented. Along with recent studies purporting possible adverse health effects from fluorides, this proven public health intervention is again being challenged. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of dental fluorosis for children from fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas in British Columbia. In addition, children and parents were provided with an opportunity to express concerns about the aesthetics of the child's anterior teeth. Children from representative schools in two communities were surveyed using the Tooth Surface Index of Fluorosis (TSIF). Questionnaires were sent home to parents to detail their child's use of various fluoride preventive practices and residence histories. Completed questionnaires were returned and exams were performed on 1131 children. Of those examined, 60% had dental fluorosis on at least two tooth surfaces, only 8% had scores ranging from "2" to "6", and 52% were classified with a score of "1". Parental and child ratings on the aesthetics or color of the child's teeth suggests that there are few children with aesthetic problems in the TSIF category of "1". While concerns of parents were more common, the actual source of those concerns was not assessed in the questionnaire. Not unexpectedly, children with fluorosis on anterior teeth ranging between TSIF scores of "2" to "6" appear to have increased concerns about tooth color. Data from children with confirmed residence histories from fluoridated communities suggest that the occurrence of aesthetic problems in these children is rare.
PubMed ID
8306613 View in PubMed
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The basic philosophy of the British Columbia dental public health program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110524
Source
Can J Public Health. 1968 Sep;59(9):337-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1968

Effects of lifelong consumption of fluoridated water or use of fluoride supplements on dental caries prevalence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215900
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1995 Feb;23(1):20-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
D C Clark
H J Hann
M F Williamson
J. Berkowitz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1995 Feb;23(1):20-4
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Fissures - epidemiology - prevention & control
Educational Status
Fluoridation
Fluorides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Humans
Observer Variation
Parents
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of dental caries in children ages 6-14, from fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas in British Columbia, Canada, and the effects of receiving certain fluoride preventive procedures during childhood. Children from two communities were surveyed using a modified Decayed, Missing and Filled Tooth Surface Index (D1D2MFS). Questionnaires on the use of various fluoride preventive practices and residence histories during childhood were collected. Completed questionnaires were returned and exams were performed on 1131 children. Crude caries prevalence scores for the different fluoride exposure groups were tested for differences in dental age and the level of educational attainment of parents and/or guardians. No significant group differences were found. The 110 children with lifelong exposure only to fluoridated water had 35%, or 0.88 (S.D. = 2.91), fewer decayed or filled tooth surfaces per child (P
PubMed ID
7774172 View in PubMed
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Influence of exposure to various fluoride technologies on the prevalence of dental fluorosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216787
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1994 Dec;22(6):461-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
D C Clark
H J Hann
M F Williamson
J. Berkowitz
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1994 Dec;22(6):461-4
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Educational Status
Fluoridation
Fluorides - administration & dosage
Fluorosis, Dental - classification - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Parents
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Water supply
Abstract
An increase in the prevalence of dental fluorosis among children in North America is well documented. Published reports of the relationship between the occurrence of dental fluorosis and early exposure to various fluorides and the use of different types of infant feeding practices have begun to provide insights into possible causes for this increase. This study was designed to investigate this issue for children living in a non-fluoridated and a fluoridated community in British Columbia, Canada. Parents or guardians completed a questionnaire which detailed exposure to different types of fluorides and infant feeding practices during the first 6 yr of life. Completed questionnaires were returned and examinations were performed on 1131 children. 60% of children had dental fluorosis, and only 8% presented with scores of 2 or greater. Logistic regression analyses showed that the use of infant formula and parental educational attainment were significantly associated with the occurrence of dental fluorosis in the range of scores from 2 to 6. Despite these statistically significant findings, these variables actually had little additional predictive value beyond a chance occurrence in determining which children would have dental fluorosis.
PubMed ID
7882664 View in PubMed
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Is there a sound basis for deciding how many dentists should be trained to meet the dental needs of the Canadian population? Systematic review of literature (1968-1999).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195352
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Feb;67(2):87-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
G. Maupomé
H J Hann
J M Ray
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. maupome@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Feb;67(2):87-91
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dentistry - manpower
Dentists - supply & distribution
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data
Health Planning - methods
Health services needs and demand
Humans
MEDLINE
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
A systematic review was conducted of the literature on human resources planning (HRP) in dentistry in Canada, critically assessing the scientific strength of 1968-1999 publications. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to 176 peer-reviewed publications and "grey literature" reports. Thirty papers were subsequently assessed for strength of design and relevance of evidence to objectively address HRP. Twelve papers were position statements or experts' reports not amenable for inclusion in the system. Of the remaining 18 papers, 4 were classified as projections from manpower-to-population ratios, 4 as dental practitioner opinion surveys, 8 as estimates of requisite demand to absorb current capacity and 2 as need-based, demand-weighted studies. Within the 30.5 years reviewed, 53.4% of papers were published between 1982 and 1987. Overall, many papers called for a reduction in human resources, a message that dominated HRP during the 1980s, or noted an increase in the demand for services. HRP publications often had questionable strength or analytic frameworks. The paradigm of busyness-scarcity evolved from a belief around an economic model for the profession into a fundamental tenet of HRP. A formal analysis to establish its existence beyond arbitrary dentist:population ratios has usually been lacking.
PubMed ID
11253296 View in PubMed
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Optimum fluoride levels for community water supplies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110662
Source
J Can Dent Assoc (Tor). 1968 May;34(5):250-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1968
Author
H J Hann
Source
J Can Dent Assoc (Tor). 1968 May;34(5):250-4
Date
May-1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Fluoridation
Fluorides - analysis
Humans
Water - analysis
Water supply
PubMed ID
5239611 View in PubMed
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Tooth occlusion in school children. British Columbia Children's Dental Health Survey 1980.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240065
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1984 Oct;50(10):767-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1984

A win for fluoridation in Squamish, British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231534
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1989;49(3):170-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
D C Clark
H J Hann
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1989;49(3):170-1
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Fluoridation
Humans
Legislation, Dental
PubMed ID
2769636 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.