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Acute impacts of extreme temperature exposure on emergency room admissions related to mental and behavior disorders in Toronto, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256377
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Xiang Wang
Eric Lavigne
Hélène Ouellette-kuntz
Bingshu E Chen
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Food-Borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Environmental Issues Division, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Canada. Electronic address: wanqus@gmail.com.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cities
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Nonlinear Dynamics
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of extreme ambient temperature on hospital emergency room visits (ER) related to mental and behavioral illnesses in Toronto, Canada.
A time series study was conducted using health and climatic data from 2002 to 2010 in Toronto, Canada. Relative risks (RRs) for increases in emergency room (ER) visits were estimated for specific mental and behavioral diseases (MBD) after exposure to hot and cold temperatures while using the 50th percentile of the daily mean temperature as reference. Poisson regression models using a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) were used. We adjusted for the effects of seasonality, humidity, day-of-the-week and outdoor air pollutants.
We found a strong association between MBD ER visits and mean daily temperature at 28?C. The association was strongest within a period of 0-4 days for exposure to hot temperatures. A 29% (RR=1.29, 95% CI 1.09-1.53) increase in MBD ER vists was observed over a cumulative period of 7 days after exposure to high ambient temperature (99th percentile vs. 50th percentile). Similar associations were reported for schizophrenia, mood, and neurotic disorers. No significant associations with cold temperatures were reported.
The ecological nature and the fact that only one city was investigated.
Our findings suggest that extreme temperature poses a risk to the health and wellbeing for individuals with mental and behavior illnesses. Patient management and education may need to be improved as extreme temperatures may become more prevalent with climate change.
PubMed ID
24332428 View in PubMed
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Acute psychiatric inpatient care for people with a dual diagnosis: patient profiles and lengths of stay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190382
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2002 Apr;47(3):243-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Philip Burge
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Haider Saeed
Bruce McCreary
Dana Paquette
Franklin Sim
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Department of Psychiatry, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6. burgep@post.queensu.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2002 Apr;47(3):243-9
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Comorbidity
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Female
Hospitals, General
Humans
Intellectual Disability - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study describes characteristics of psychiatry inpatients with developmental disabilities (DD) and their admissions to psychiatry wards in 2 acute care hospitals. It also compares differences in lengths of stay between admissions of this group with a comparison sample of inpatient admissions without DD.
A retrospective chart review was conducted on all individuals with DD who were psychiatric inpatients at 2 Kingston, Ontario, general hospitals, within a 4-year period (1994 to 1998). A comparison sample of admissions of patients without DD was chosen. Frequency tables were used to describe the inpatients with DD and to describe the 2 samples of admissions. Nonparametric statistics were used to compare the median length of stay between the 2 samples. Associations between length of stay and other covariates were explored within the sample of patient admissions with DD.
The 62 individuals with DD had 101 admissions over the study period. Suicidal ideation was the most common admission reason (46%), and mood disorder was the most common discharge diagnosis (29%). The median length of stay for patients with DD was 8 days, which did not differ meaningfully from the comparison sample. Variables that were significantly associated with length of stay among individuals with DD included sex, referral source, and diagnosis.
When individuals with DD are psychiatric inpatients, their length of stay is affected by some factors that have been identified in previous studies not specific to DD (for example, referral source and diagnosis). Our finding that male patients with DD have longer lengths of stay than do female patients in the same sample has not been reported in previous research.
PubMed ID
11987475 View in PubMed
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Addressing health disparities through promoting equity for individuals with intellectual disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173499
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S8-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Nathalie Garcin
M E Suzanne Lewis
Patricia Minnes
Carol Martin
Jeanette J A Holden
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health & Epidemiology, Queen's University & Ongwanada. oullette@post.queensu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S8-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Health Behavior
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Health status
Humans
Intellectual Disability - classification - genetics - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Abstract
Intellectual disabilities (ID) are conditions originating before the age of 18 that result in significant limitations in intellectual functioning and conceptual, social and practical adaptive skills. IDs affect 1 to 3% of the population. Persons with ID are more likely to have physical disabilities, mental health problems, hearing impairments, vision impairments and communication disorders. These co-existing disabilities, combined with the limitations in intellectual functioning and in adaptive behaviours, make this group of Canadians particularly vulnerable to health disparities. The purpose of this synthesis article is to explore potential contributory factors to health vulnerabilities faced by persons with ID, reveal the extent and nature of health disparities in this population, and examine initiatives to address such differences. The review indicates that persons with ID fare worse than the general population on a number of key health indicators. The factors leading to vulnerability are numerous and complex. They include the way society has viewed ID, the etiology of ID, health damaging behaviours, exposure to unhealthy environments, health-related mobility and inadequate access to essential health and other basic services. For persons with ID there are important disparities in access to care that are difficult to disentangle from discriminatory values and practice. Policy-makers in the United States, England and Scotland have recently begun to address these issues. It is recommended that a clear vision for health policy and strategies be created to address health disparities faced by persons with ID in Canada.
PubMed ID
16078552 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of medical clerks toward persons with intellectual disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123092
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2012 May;58(5):e282-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Philip Burge
Shaun Cleaver
Barry Isaacs
Yona Lunsky
Jessica Jones
Rianne Hastie
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queens' University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. helene.kuntz@queensu.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2012 May;58(5):e282-8
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Intellectual Disability - psychology
Male
Ontario
Professional-Patient Relations - ethics
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the attitudes of upper-year undergraduate medical students (ie, clerks) toward the philosophy of community inclusion of persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) according to demographic, personal contact, and training variables.
Cross-sectional self-administered survey.
Clerkship rotations at Queen's University in Kingston, Ont, and the University of Toronto in Ontario in 2006.
A total of 258 clerks.
Scores on the Community Living Attitudes Scale-Short Form.
There were no differences in the Community Living Attitudes Scale-Short Form subscale scores across categories of demographic characteristics, personal contact, or having received didactic training about ID. Clerks who had seen patients with ID during their medical school training had higher mean sheltering subscale scores than those who had not (3.27 vs 3.07, P = .02). Additional analysis revealed that 88.5% of clerks who had seen patients with ID reported seeing 5 or fewer such patients, and that those who rated the quality of their supervision more positively had higher mean scores on the empowerment subscale and lower mean scores on the sheltering subscale.
Although specific training has the potential to promote more socially progressive attitudes regarding persons with ID, lower-quality supervision is associated with higher endorsement of items expressing the need to shelter individuals with ID from harm and lower endorsement of items promoting empowerment.
Notes
Cites: Bioethics. 1993 Oct;7(5):420-3511656252
Cites: J Intellect Disabil Res. 2002 Jun;46(Pt 5):365-7812031020
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2003 Sep;48(8):538-4514574829
Cites: J Child Neurol. 1992 Jul;7(3):304-101386091
Cites: Am J Ment Retard. 1994 Jan;98(4):519-268148128
Cites: Ment Retard. 1996 Jun;34(3):149-588684283
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2011 May;57(5):541-53, e154-6821571716
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S8-2216078552
Cites: Ment Retard Dev Disabil Res Rev. 2006;12(1):70-8216435327
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2006 Nov;52(11):1373-4, 1378-917279190
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2008 Apr;54(4):568-9, 569.e1-618411386
Cites: BMJ. 2008;337:a250719064601
Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2009;9:7820042110
Cites: J Intellect Disabil Res. 1997 Oct;41 ( Pt 5):380-909373818
PubMed ID
22734171 View in PubMed
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A comparison of the prevalence of chronic disease among people with and without intellectual disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118802
Source
Am J Intellect Dev Disabil. 2012 Nov;117(6):455-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Diane Morin
Julie Mérineau-Côté
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Marc J Tassé
Michael Kerr
Author Affiliation
Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Intellect Dev Disabil. 2012 Nov;117(6):455-63
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Data Collection
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Databases, Factual
Down Syndrome - complications - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Intellectual Disability - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Some studies have reported the presence of health disparities in people with intellectual disability. This study compared the prevalence of chronic health conditions between people with and without intellectual disability (ID). Health-related data for 791 people with ID were collected through a province-wide mail survey in Quebec, Canada. The distribution of chronic health conditions reported was compared to the data on the health status of the general population. People with ID had higher reported rates of heart disease and thyroid disorder than the general population. We also found that people with ID were less likely to report suffering from arthritis, migraines, back or spinal pain, and food allergies. Significant health differences were found when the ID sample was stratified by etiology (i.e., Down syndrome) and severity of intellectual deficits. We discuss these results and the need for future research to understand the differences found in the health status of people with ID.
PubMed ID
23167485 View in PubMed
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Factors predicting adherence to the Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for nutrition support in mechanically ventilated, critically ill adult patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155514
Source
J Crit Care. 2008 Sep;23(3):301-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Naomi E Jones
Rupinder Dhaliwal
Andrew G Day
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
Source
J Crit Care. 2008 Sep;23(3):301-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Critical Illness - therapy
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Bed Capacity - standards - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Community - standards - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intensive Care Units - standards - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Support - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prospective Studies
Respiration, Artificial
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine factors that are associated with adherence to the Canadian nutrition support clinical practice guidelines (CPGs).
We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a prospective observational cohort study of nutrition support practices in 58 intensive care units (ICUs) across Canada, grouped into 50 clusters. Adequacy of enteral nutrition (EN) (energy received from EN / energy prescribed by the dietitian x 100), was used as a marker of adherence to the guidelines. We applied hierarchical modeling techniques to examine the impact of various hospital, ICU, and patient factors on EN adequacy.
The overall average EN adequacy was 51.3% (SE, 1.8%). In a multiple regression analysis, after adjusting for varying days of observation, hospital type (academic 54.3% vs community 45.2%, P
PubMed ID
18725033 View in PubMed
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Length of stay for psychiatric inpatient services: a comparison of admissions of people with and without developmental disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183046
Source
J Behav Health Serv Res. 2003 Oct-Dec;30(4):406-17
Publication Type
Article
Author
Haider Saeed
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Heather Stuart
Philip Burge
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health & Epidemiology, Abramsky Hall, Queen's University at Kingston, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. saeedh@mail.amc.edu
Source
J Behav Health Serv Res. 2003 Oct-Dec;30(4):406-17
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Cohort Studies
Deinstitutionalization
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Psychiatric - utilization
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - utilization
Residential Facilities - supply & distribution
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
This study investigated associations between the presence of developmental disabilities and length of inpatient stay for mental health care. All psychiatric admissions of people with developmental disabilities over a 5-year period were selected (n = 294), and were compared using survival analysis to a random sample of admissions from the general psychiatric population (n = 287). Overall, people with developmental disabilities stayed in hospital longer than those without developmental disabilities, and this extra stay was partially attributed to casemix differences between the cohorts. Subanalysis in both cohorts showed that those going back to their usual living arrangement stayed a shorter period than those who were discharged elsewhere, and that people with developmental disabilities were less likely to be discharged to their usual living arrangement than were people without the disability. This study highlighted the importance of specialized residential and personal supports for people with developmental disabilities and a coexisting mental disorder.
PubMed ID
14593664 View in PubMed
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Medical students' views on training in intellectual disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157745
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Apr;54(4):568-9, 569.e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Philip Burge
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Barry Isaacs
Yona Lunsky
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, c/o Ongwanada, 191 Portsmouth Ave, Kingston, ON K7M 8A6. burgep@queensu.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Apr;54(4):568-9, 569.e1-6
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Career Choice
Child
Clinical Clerkship - organization & administration
Cross-Sectional Studies
Developmental Disabilities - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Psychiatry - education
Students, Medical - psychology
Abstract
To examine undergraduate medical training in the field of intellectual disabilities (ID) from the perspective of clinical clerks.
Cross-sectional self-administered survey.
Clerkship rotations at Queen's University in Kingston, Ont, and the University of Toronto in Ontario in 2006.
A total of 196 upper-year undergraduate medical students (clerks).
Contact with people with ID, training in the field of ID, perceptions of current training in ID, and views on ways to improve the curriculum in the area of ID.
Most students (85.6%) had received some didactic and clinical training in managing patients with ID,but most of these (93.3%) believed that curriculum enhancements, especially more contact with patients with ID and more time in the curriculum for training in care of people with ID, were necessary.
This study found that the curriculum enhancements long recommended by experts in the field of ID were also desired by clinical clerks. This finding adds considerable weight to the recommendation that improvements in training in ID should be incorporated into undergraduate medical education programs.
Notes
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2002 Aug;47(6):568-7112211886
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2002 Sep;47(7):652-912355677
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2003 Sep;48(8):538-4514574829
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2004 Mar;55(3):312-415001734
Cites: Can Psychiatr Assoc J. 1974 Feb;19(1):51-34812976
Cites: Can Psychiatr Assoc J. 1974 Feb;19(1):55-84812977
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2006 Nov;52(11):1410-817279198
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1991 Oct;36(8):601-51742716
Cites: Am J Ment Retard. 1995 May;99(6):595-6047632427
Cites: Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 1995 Dec;29(4):632-78825826
Cites: Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 1996 Dec;30(6):774-809034466
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S8-2216078552
Cites: Med Teach. 1988;10(3-4):283-83237032
PubMed ID
18411386 View in PubMed
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Regional variation in dental procedures among people with an intellectual disability, Ontario, 1995-2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177568
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2004 Nov;70(10):681, 681a-681f
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Robert S Balogh
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Duncan J W Hunter
Author Affiliation
International Centre for the Advancement of Community-Based Rehabilitation, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2004 Nov;70(10):681, 681a-681f
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Care for Disabled - statistics & numerical data
Dental Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Mentally Disabled Persons - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Quality of Health Care
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The literature indicates that people with an intellectual disability have a prevalence of dental caries that is either lower than or similar to that of the general population. However, many of their caries go untreated, and extractions are more often used as a means of treatment than in the general population. A substantial percentage (40%) of day admissions to hospital of people with intellectual disabilities in Ontario is related to dental diseases. In this paper, we examine whether rates of in-hospital dental procedures are evenly distributed across Ontario and discuss possible explanations for the findings.
A retrospective analysis was made of routinely collected hospital admission data for people with an intellectual disability. Age- and gender-adjusted rates for dental procedures were calculated using the direct method of adjustment and 1996 census population estimates of Ontario. Three different summary measures for the assessment of regional variation were used.
Two areas had dental procedure rates among those with an intellectual disability that were significantly lower than the overall Ontario rate: Hamilton-Wentworth and Quinte-Kingston and Rideau. The 3 district health council areas with the highest rates for dental procedures were Niagara, Essex-Kent and Lambton, and Durham-Haliburton-Kawartha and Pine Ridge; all 3 rates were higher than the overall Ontario rate.
The use of day surgery and in-hospital visits to treat dental diseases in people with an intellectual disability varies considerably by region in Ontario. Observed differences may indicate inequities.
PubMed ID
15530265 View in PubMed
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Trends in autism prevalence: diagnostic substitution revisited.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160518
Source
J Autism Dev Disord. 2008 Jul;38(6):1036-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Helen Coo
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Jennifer E V Lloyd
Liza Kasmara
Jeanette J A Holden
M E Suzanne Lewis
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, c/o Ongwanada Resource Centre, 191 Portsmouth Avenue, Kingston, ON, Canada, K7M 8A6.
Source
J Autism Dev Disord. 2008 Jul;38(6):1036-46
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autistic Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Education, Special - trends
Humans
Incidence
Referral and Consultation - trends
Abstract
There has been little evidence to support the hypothesis that diagnostic substitution may contribute to increases in the administrative prevalence of autism. We examined trends in assignment of special education codes to British Columbia (BC) school children who had an autism code in at least 1 year between 1996 and 2004, inclusive. The proportion of children with an autism code increased from 12.3/10,000 in 1996 to 43.1/10,000 in 2004; 51.9% of this increase was attributable to children switching from another special education classification to autism (16.0/10,000). Taking into account the reverse situation (children with an autism code switching to another special education category (5.9/10.000)), diagnostic substitution accounted for at least one-third of the increase in autism prevalence over the study period.
PubMed ID
17975721 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.