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Adaptation of wives to prostate cancer following diagnosis and 3 months after treatment: a test of family adaptation theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168110
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):827-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Hélène Ezer
Nicole Ricard
Louise Bouchard
Luis Souhami
Fred Saad
Armen Aprikian
Yoshi Taguchi
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, Montreal, Canada H3A 2A7. helene.ezer@mcgill.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):827-38
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aftercare - psychology
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Erectile Dysfunction - etiology
Family Health
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Prospective Studies
Prostatic Neoplasms - complications - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Psychological Theory
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Urination Disorders - etiology
Abstract
Prostate cancer challenges not only the men with the disease, but also their partners. Existing studies have focused on the relationship between type of treatment and sexual and urinary function in men, with recent qualitative work suggesting that men and their spouses have differing responses to the illness. Factors predicting women's adaptation to prostate cancer have not been examined.
Using a model derived from family stress and adaptation theory, this study examined (1) the contribution of urinary and sexual symptoms, sense of coherence, marital resources and situational appraisal to wives' global adaptation (PAIS) and emotional adaptation (POMS), and (2) the role of situational appraisal as a mediator between the set of independent variables and PAIS and POMS.
In a prospective, correlational design, data were collected from 70 women following their partners' diagnosis and again 3 months later.
Using a path analysis approach, between 30% and 62.7% of the variance in global adjustment and mood disturbance was explained across model tests. Sense of coherence was a strong and consistent predictor. Appraisal acted as a mediator only at time 2, mediating the effect of symptom distress on global adaptation. Change in sense of coherence and change in family resources predicted global adaptation and emotional adaptation at time 2, and predicted the change between time 1 and 2 in those variables.
The findings suggest nursing interventions that mobilize and build wives' sense of the manageability, meaningfulness and comprehensibility of life events, and that foster cohesion and flexibility within the marital relationship. Interventions that mitigate the impact of urinary symptoms and the appraisal of threat in the illness event are also indicated. Additional model-testing studies based on family adaptation theory with patients and family members in other types of cancer would help build nursing knowledge for interventions in cancer.
PubMed ID
16876802 View in PubMed
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Do men and their wives see it the same way? Congruence within couples during the first year of prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140404
Source
Psychooncology. 2011 Feb;20(2):155-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Hélène Ezer
Juliana L Rigol Chachamovich
Eduardo Chachamovich
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, Wilson Hall, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Psychooncology. 2011 Feb;20(2):155-64
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Prostatic Neoplasms - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the psychosocial adjustment congruence within couples through the first year of prostate cancer experience, and to explore the personal variables that could predict congruence within couples.
Eighty-one couples were interviewed at the time of diagnosis; 69 participated at 3 months and 61 at 12 months. Paired t-tests were used to examine dyadic congruence on seven domains of psychosocial adjustment. Repeated Measures ANOVAs were used to examine the congruence over time. Multiple regressions were used to determine whether mood disturbance, urinary and sexual bother, sense of coherence, and social support were predictors of congruence within couples on each of the adjustment domains.
At time 1, couples had incongruent perceptions in 3 of 7 domains: health care, psychological, and social adjustment. Three months later, health care, psychological, and sexual domains showed incongruence within couples. One year after the diagnosis, there were incongruent perceptions only in sexual and psychological domains. There was little variation of the congruence within couples over time. Husbands and wives' mood disturbance, urinary and sexual bother, sense of coherence, and social support accounted for 25-63% of variance in couple congruence in the adjustment domains in the study periods.
The findings suggested that there is couple congruence. Domains in which incongruence was observed are important targets for clinical interventions. Greater attention needs to be directed to assisting couples to recognize the differences between their perceptions, especially the ones related to the sexual symptoms and psychological distress.
PubMed ID
20878828 View in PubMed
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Family caregivers of palliative cancer patients at home: the puzzle of pain management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141481
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(2):78-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Anita Mehta
S Robin Cohen
Franco A Carnevale
Hélène Ezer
Francine Ducharme
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Center, Psychosocial Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1A4. anita.mehta@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(2):78-87
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Neoplasms - therapy
Pain - prevention & control
Palliative Care
Patient Care Planning
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Professional-Family Relations
Quebec
Social Support
Abstract
The purpose of this grounded theory study was to understand the processes used by family caregivers to manage the pain of cancer patients at home. A total of 24 family caregivers participated. They were recruited using purposeful then theoretical sampling. The data sources were taped, transcribed (semi-structured) interviews and field notes. Data analysis was based on Strauss and Corbin's (1998) requirements for open, axial, and selective coding. The result was an explanatory model titled "the puzzle of pain management," which includes four main processes: "drawing on past experiences"; "strategizing a game plan"; "striving to respond to pain"; and "gauging the best fit," a decision-making process that joins the puzzle pieces. Understanding how family caregivers assemble their puzzle pieces can help health care professionals make decisions related to the care plans they create for pain control and help them to recognize the importance of providing information as part of resolving the puzzle of pain management.
PubMed ID
20718392 View in PubMed
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Family caregivers of palliative cancer patients at home: the puzzle of pain management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139572
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(3):184-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Anita Mehta
S Robin Cohen
Franco A Carnevale
Hélène Ezer
Francine Ducharme
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Center, Psychosocial Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1A4. anita.mehta@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(3):184-93
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - education - psychology
Decision Making
Family - psychology
Female
Home Nursing - methods - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Neoplasms - complications
Nursing Methodology Research
Pain - etiology - prevention & control
Palliative Care - methods - psychology
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this grounded theory study was to understand the processes used by family caregivers to manage the pain of cancer patients at home. A total of 24 family caregivers participated. They were recruited using purposeful then theoretical sampling. The data sources were taped, transcribed (semi-structured) interviews and field notes. Data analysis was based on Strauss and Corbin's (1998) requirements for open, axial, and selective coding. The result was an explanatory model titled "the puzzle of pain management," which includes four main processes: "drawing on past experiences"; "strategizing a game plan"; "striving to respond to pain"; and "gauging the best fit," a decision-making process that joins the puzzle pieces. Understanding how family caregivers assemble their puzzle pieces can help health care professionals make decisions related to the care plans they create for pain control and help them to recognize the importance of providing information as part of resolving the puzzle of pain management.
PubMed ID
21047041 View in PubMed
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Living in it, living with it, and moving on: dimensions of meaning during chemotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191747
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2002 Jan-Feb;29(1):113-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marie-Claire Richer
Hélène Ezer
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. marie-claire.richer@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2002 Jan-Feb;29(1):113-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects
Attitude to Health
Body Image
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - nursing - psychology
Existentialism
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Oncology Nursing
Quality of Life
Quebec
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Abstract
To explore the meanings assigned to the experience of receiving chemotherapy.
Descriptive exploratory.
An oncology outpatient clinic in a university hospital in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Ten women with breast cancer who experienced chemotherapy for the first time.
Semistructured interview using a grounded theory approach.
Women described three dimensions of their experience with breast cancer and chemotherapy: "living in it," "living with it," and "moving on." Existential and situational meanings were an integral part of their experience. The existential meaning seemed to be present in varying degrees of intensity throughout the treatment, whereas the situational meanings were predominant at the beginning of the treatment phase and became less important as the treatment progressed.
The intrapersonal and interpersonal dimensions of the chemotherapy experience as well as the capacity to move on evolve within a context of both situational and existential meanings.
The study results suggest the potential value of exploring each woman's inner world of meanings in relation to her sense of self, relationships with others, resources, and coping strategies during treatment for breast cancer. Because existential and situational meanings are an integral part of women's experience, the nurse's role is to create an environment that permits and facilitates dialogue about these dimensions of meaning.
Notes
Comment In: Oncol Nurs Forum. 2002 Jun;29(5):751; author reply 75112064322
PubMed ID
11817485 View in PubMed
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Return visits to the emergency department: what can we learn from older adults' experiences?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104379
Source
J Gerontol Nurs. 2014 Jul;40(7):32-40; quiz 42-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Victor Uscatescu
Alyson Turner
Hélène Ezer
Source
J Gerontol Nurs. 2014 Jul;40(7):32-40; quiz 42-3
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Education, Continuing
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Humans
Patient Readmission
Abstract
Unscheduled return visits to the emergency department (ED) represent a considerable segment of older adults' total visits to the ED. This study explores the factors that led to early return visits to the ED by older adults. Using a qualitative descriptive design, semi-structured interviews were conducted in a large teaching hospital with 15 older adults who returned to the ED within 2 weeks after an initial visit. From the interviews, three major themes emerged as precipitants that led older adults to return to the ED. These were Managing the Symptoms, Care Curing the Initial ED Visit, and Who I Am. The findings suggest that the main reason for older adults' return to the ED is the severity of the symptoms they experienced. Ensuring the timeliness of follow-up appointments and the provision of resources to support the transition home are identified as interventions that would improve the care provided in EDs.
PubMed ID
24779369 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.