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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121827
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Date
Mar-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa
Brassica
Bread
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Norway
Pyrus
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Secale cereale
Vegetables
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb;111(4):758-9
PubMed ID
22874538 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the healthy Nordic food index and total and cause-specific mortality among Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268918
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Nina Roswall
Sven Sandin
Marie Löf
Guri Skeie
Anja Olsen
Hans-Olov Adami
Elisabete Weiderpass
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Diet
Edible Grain
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Several healthy dietary patterns have been linked to longevity. Recently, a Nordic dietary pattern was associated with a lower overall mortality. No study has, however, investigated this dietary pattern in relation to cause-specific mortality. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index (consisting of wholegrain bread, oatmeal, apples/pears, root vegetables, cabbages and fish/shellfish) and overall mortality, and death by cardiovascular disease, cancer, injuries/suicide and other causes. We conducted a prospective analysis in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort, including 44,961 women, aged 29-49 years, who completed a food frequency questionnaire between 1991-1992, and have been followed up for mortality ever since, through Swedish registries. The median follow-up time is 21.3 years, and mortality rate ratios (MRR) were calculated using Cox Proportional Hazards Models. Compared to women with the lowest index score (0-1 points), those with the highest score (4-6 points) had an 18% lower overall mortality (MRR 0.82; 0.71-0.93, p
PubMed ID
25784368 View in PubMed
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Adolescent body composition and associations with body size and growth from birth to late adolescence. The Tromsø study: Fit Futures-A Norwegian longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296939
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2018 Dec 27; :e12492
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-27-2018
Author
Elin Evensen
Nina Emaus
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Ane Kokkvoll
Jonathan Wells
Tom Wilsgaard
Anne Winther
Guri Skeie
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2018 Dec 27; :e12492
Date
Dec-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Fat and fat-free masses and fat distribution are related to cardiometabolic risk.
to explore how birth weight, childhood body mass index (BMI) and BMI gain were related to adolescent body composition and central obesity.
In a population-based longitudinal study, body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 907 Norwegian adolescents (48% girls). Associations between birth weight, BMI categories, and BMI gain were evaluated by fitting linear mixed models and conditional growth models with fat mass index (FMI, kg/m2 ), fat-free mass index (FFMI, kg/m2 ) standard deviation scores (SDS), and central obesity at 15 to 20 years, as well as change in FMI SDS and FFMI SDS between ages 15 to 17 and 18 to 20 as outcomes.
Birth weight was associated with FFMI in adolescence. Greater BMI gain in childhood, conditioned on prior body size, was associated with higher FMI, FFMI, and central overweight/obesity with the strongest associations seen at age 6 to 16.5 years: FMI SDS: ß = 0.67, 95% CI (0.63-0.71), FFMI SDS: 0.46 (0.39, 0.52), in girls, FMI SDS: 0.80 (0.75, 0.86), FFMI SDS: 0.49 (0.43, 0.55), in boys.
Compared with birth and early childhood, high BMI and greater BMI gain at later ages are strong predictors of higher fat mass and central overweight/obesity at 15 to 20 years of age.
PubMed ID
30590874 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent body composition and associations with body size and growth from birth to late adolescence. The Tromsø study: Fit Futures-A Norwegian longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300460
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2019 05; 14(5):e12492
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2019
Author
Elin Evensen
Nina Emaus
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Ane Kokkvoll
Jonathan Wells
Tom Wilsgaard
Anne Winther
Guri Skeie
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2019 05; 14(5):e12492
Date
05-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Composition
Body mass index
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Pediatric Obesity - epidemiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Fat and fat-free masses and fat distribution are related to cardiometabolic risk.
to explore how birth weight, childhood body mass index (BMI) and BMI gain were related to adolescent body composition and central obesity.
In a population-based longitudinal study, body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 907 Norwegian adolescents (48% girls). Associations between birth weight, BMI categories, and BMI gain were evaluated by fitting linear mixed models and conditional growth models with fat mass index (FMI, kg/m2 ), fat-free mass index (FFMI, kg/m2 ) standard deviation scores (SDS), and central obesity at 15 to 20 years, as well as change in FMI SDS and FFMI SDS between ages 15 to 17 and 18 to 20 as outcomes.
Birth weight was associated with FFMI in adolescence. Greater BMI gain in childhood, conditioned on prior body size, was associated with higher FMI, FFMI, and central overweight/obesity with the strongest associations seen at age 6 to 16.5 years: FMI SDS: ß = 0.67, 95% CI (0.63-0.71), FFMI SDS: 0.46 (0.39, 0.52), in girls, FMI SDS: 0.80 (0.75, 0.86), FFMI SDS: 0.49 (0.43, 0.55), in boys.
Compared with birth and early childhood, high BMI and greater BMI gain at later ages are strong predictors of higher fat mass and central overweight/obesity at 15 to 20 years of age.
PubMed ID
30590874 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption over time and mortality in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287321
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 11 02;6(11):e012862
Publication Type
Article
Date
11-02-2016
Author
Idlir Licaj
Sven Sandin
Guri Skeie
Hans-Olov Adami
Nina Roswall
Elisabete Weiderpass
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 11 02;6(11):e012862
Date
11-02-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Female
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Alcohol consumption is steadily increasing in high-income countries but the harm and possible net benefits of light-to-moderate drinking remain controversial. We prospectively investigated the association between time-varying alcohol consumption and overall and cause-specific mortality among middle-aged women.
Among 48 249 women at baseline (33 404 at follow-up) in the prospective Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort, age 30-49 years at baseline, we used repeated information on alcohol consumption and combined this method with multiple imputation in order to maximise the number of participants and deaths included in the analyses. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to calculate HRs for overall and cause-specific mortality.
During >900 000 person/years, a total of 2100 deaths were recorded through Swedish registries. The median alcohol consumption increased from 2.3 g/day in 1991/1992 (baseline) to 4.7 g/day in 2004 (follow-up). Compared with light drinkers (0.1-1.5 g/day), a null association was observed for all categories of alcohol consumption with the exception of never drinkers. The HR comparing never with light drinkers was 1.46 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.74). There was a statistically significant negative trend between increasing alcohol consumption and cardiovascular and ischaemic heart diseases mortality. The results were similar when women with prevalent conditions were excluded.
In conclusion, in a cohort of young women, light alcohol consumption was protective for cardiovascular and ischaemic heart disease mortality but not for cancer and overall mortality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27807087 View in PubMed
Less detail

Change in potato consumption among Norwegian women 1998-2005-The Norwegian Women and Cancer study (NOWAC).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286096
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(6):e0179441
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Ambrose Ojodale Attah
Tonje Braaten
Guri Skeie
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(6):e0179441
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feeding Behavior
Female
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Population Surveillance
Sex Factors
Solanum tuberosum
Abstract
Studies have shown that potato consumption in Norway have been on the decline in recent years. Increase in income and the association of potato consumption with weight gain and chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes have been identified as some of the factors responsible for the change. The aim of this study was to describe the change in potato consumption within persons and how non-dietary variables influenced that change among participants in the Norwegian Women and Cancer study (NOWAC). A prospective analysis was performed in the NOWAC cohort using linear regression. Data on dietary, lifestyle, socioeconomic and health-related factors were collected by mailed questionnaires. The change in potato consumption among 38,820 women aged 41-70 years was investigated using two measurements taken at intervals of 4-6 years. At baseline, mean intake was 112g per day; this had decreased to 94.5g per day at the second measurement. Results showed that the percentage of women who reported that they ate less than 1 potato a day increased from 24.6% at baseline to 35.5% at the second measurement. Those who reported that they ate more than 3 potatoes a day had decreased from 20.2% of the participants at baseline to 12.1% at the second measurement. Multivariable adjusted results show that geography was an important predictor of potato consumption at second measurement. Living in the north compared to Oslo (the capital) was associated with higher intake of potato at second measurement (B: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.55-0.65). Compared to women living with a partner, living alone was associated with lower potato intake at second measurement (B: -0.13, 95% CI: -0.17 --0.09) while living with children tended to be associated with higher potato intake at second measurement (B: 0.01, 95% CI: -0.02-0.04). Younger age, more years of education, higher income or BMI was associated with a lower potato intake at second measurement. Smoking was associated with a higher intake of potato at second measurement (B: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.00-0.06 for smokers compared to non-smokers). Having diabetes at baseline was associated with lower intake of potato at second measurement (B: -0.04, 95% CI: -0.14 --0.06 for non-diabetics compared to diabetics). Potato consumption among women in the NOWAC study showed a decline over the period studied. Change in the consumption was found to be influenced by age, education, income, household structure, region of residence as well as health-related factors like smoking and diabetes. The use of repeated measures is necessary to continue the monitoring and also to understand the stability and direction of the possible change in diet of a population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28598991 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterization of Norwegian women eating wholegrain bread.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274503
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Oct;18(15):2836-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Toril Bakken
Tonje Braaten
Anja Olsen
Eiliv Lund
Guri Skeie
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Oct;18(15):2836-45
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Bread
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Eating
Edible Grain
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Iron, Dietary - administration & dosage
Life Style
Middle Aged
Norway
Residence Characteristics
Smoking
Thiamine - administration & dosage
Abstract
To investigate dietary and non-dietary characteristics of wholegrain bread eaters in the Norwegian Women and Cancer study.
Cross-sectional study using an FFQ.
Women were divided into two groups according to wholegrain bread consumption.
Adult women (n 69 471).
Median daily consumption of standardized slices of wholegrain bread was 2·5 in the low intake group and 4·5 in the high intake group. The OR for high wholegrain bread consumption was 0·28, 2·19 and 4·63 for the first, third and fourth quartile of energy intake, respectively, compared with the second quartile. Living outside Oslo or in East Norway and having a high level of physical activity were associated with high wholegrain bread consumption. BMI and smoking were inversely associated with wholegrain bread consumption. Intake of many food items was positively associated with wholegrain bread consumption (P trend
PubMed ID
25711149 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coffee consumption and risk of rare cancers in Scandinavian countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297621
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 03; 33(3):287-302
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Marko Lukic
Lena Maria Nilsson
Guri Skeie
Bernt Lindahl
Tonje Braaten
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsö, Norway. marko.lukic@uit.no.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 03; 33(3):287-302
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Caffeine - administration & dosage
Coffee - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Studies on the association between heavy coffee consumption and risk of less frequently diagnosed cancers are scarce. We aimed to quantify the association between filtered, boiled, and total coffee consumption and the risk of bladder, esophageal, kidney, pancreatic, and stomach cancers. We used data from the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Information on coffee consumption was available for 193,439 participants. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the investigated cancer sites by category of total, filtered, and boiled coffee consumption. Heavy filtered coffee consumers (= 4 cups/day) had a multivariable adjusted HR of 0.74 of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer (95% CI 0.57-0.95) when compared with light filtered coffee consumers (= 1 cup/day). We did not observe significant associations between total or boiled coffee consumption and any of the investigated cancer sites, neither in the entire study sample nor in analyses stratified by sex. We found an increased risk of bladder cancer among never smokers who were heavy filtered or total coffee consumers, and an increased risk of stomach cancer in never smokers who were heavy boiled coffee consumers. Our data suggest that increased filtered coffee consumption might reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. We did not find evidence of an association between coffee consumption and the risk of esophageal or kidney cancer. The increased risk of bladder and stomach cancer was confined to never smokers.
PubMed ID
29476356 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coffee consumption and the risk of cancer in the Norwegian Women and Cancer (NOWAC) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289340
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2016 09; 31(9):905-16
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2016
Author
Marko Lukic
Idlir Licaj
Eiliv Lund
Guri Skeie
Elisabete Weiderpass
Tonje Braaten
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 9037, Tromsø, Norway. marko.lukic@uit.no.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2016 09; 31(9):905-16
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Coffee - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
An association between coffee consumption and cancer has long been investigated. Coffee consumption among Norwegian women is high, thus this is a favorable population in which to study the impact of coffee on cancer incidence. Information on coffee consumption was collected from 91,767 women at baseline in the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study. These information were applied until follow-up information on coffee consumption, collected 6-8 years after baseline, became available. Multiple imputation was performed as a method for dealing with missing data. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for breast, colorectal, lung, and ovarian cancer, as well as cancer at any site. We observed a 17 % reduced risk of colorectal cancer (HR = 0.83, 95 % CI 0.70-0.98, p trend across categories of consumption = 0.10) and a 9 % reduced risk of cancer at any site (HR = 0.91, 95 % CI 0.86-0.97, p trend = 0.03) in women who drank more than 3 and up to 7 cups/day, compared to women who drank =1 cup/day. A significantly increased risk of lung cancer was observed with a heavy coffee consumption (>7 vs. =1 cup/day HR = 2.01, 95 % CI 1.47-2.75, p trend 5 vs. =1 cup/day HR = 1.42, 95 % CI 0.44-4.57, p trend = 0.30). No significant association was found between coffee consumption and the risk of breast or ovarian cancer. In this study, coffee consumption was associated with a modest reduced risk of cancer at any site. Residual confounding due to smoking may have contributed to the positive association between high coffee consumption and the risk of lung cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27010635 View in PubMed
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Coffee Consumption and Whole-Blood Gene Expression in the Norwegian Women and Cancer Post-Genome Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296172
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Aug 09; 10(8):
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Aug-09-2018
Author
Runa B Barnung
Therese H Nøst
Stine M Ulven
Guri Skeie
Karina S Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø-The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø, Norway. runa.b.barnung@uit.no.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Aug 09; 10(8):
Date
Aug-09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coffee
Cross-Sectional Studies
Energy Metabolism - genetics
Female
Gene Expression Profiling - methods
Gene Expression Regulation
Humans
Inflammation - epidemiology - genetics
Life Style
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
RNA, Messenger - blood - genetics
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Transcriptome
Abstract
Norwegians are the second highest consumers of coffee in the world. Lately, several studies have suggested that beneficial health effects are associated with coffee consumption. By analyzing whole-blood derived, microarray based mRNA gene expression data from 958 cancer-free women from the Norwegian Women and Cancer Post-Genome Cohort, we assessed the potential associations between coffee consumption and gene expression profiles and elucidated functional interpretation. Of the 958 women included, 132 were considered low coffee consumers (3 cups of coffee/day). At a false discovery rate
Notes
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PubMed ID
30096876 View in PubMed
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