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Exploring the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and serum lipids-more than confounding?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298629
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 04; 72(4):526-533
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Rolf Jorde
Guri Grimnes
Author Affiliation
Tromsø Endocrine Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. rolf.jorde@unn.no.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 04; 72(4):526-533
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
In observational, but not interventional, studies there are strong associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and serum lipids. The purpose of the present study was to examine potential causes of this association.
A total of 17,411 subjects participating in the seventh survey of the Tromsø Study were included in the cross-sectional study; 5384 subjects who participated in both the sixth and seventh survey were included in the longitudinal study; 2365 subjects who participated in both the fourth and seventh survey were included in the genetic study; and 479 subjects with impaired glucose tolerance were included in the vitamin D binding protein (DBP) analyses.
For serum 25(OH)D, there were strong and positive associations with LDL-, HDL-, and total-cholesterol, and a negative association with triglycerides that remained after adjustment for gender, age, BMI, diet, supplements, and lifestyle factors. These associations were seen in winter as well as summer. Except for serum cholesterol, change of season for blood sampling did not affect lipid levels. However, when analyzing separately, subjects with low or no intake of vitamin D supplements, fish oil and fat fish, only the association between 25(OH)D and HDL-cholesterol remained significant. Serum DBP or single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to 25(OH)D had no relation to lipid levels.
The associations between 25(OH)D and lipids (except for HDL-cholesterol) can be explained by known confounding factors. However, for HDL-cholesterol, the cause of the association with 25(OH)D still remains unknown.
PubMed ID
29434318 View in PubMed
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The phosphodiesterase 8B gene rs4704397 is associated with thyroid function, risk of myocardial infarction, and body height: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257647
Source
Thyroid. 2014 Feb;24(2):215-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Rolf Jorde
Henrik Schirmer
Tom Wilsgaard
Ragnar Martin Joakimsen
Ellisiv Bøgeberg Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Yngve Figenschau
Johan Svartberg
Moira Strand Hutchinson
Marie Kjærgaard
Lone Jørgensen
Guri Grimnes
Author Affiliation
1 Tromsø Endocrine Research Group, University of Tromsø , Tromsø, Norway .
Source
Thyroid. 2014 Feb;24(2):215-22
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3',5'-Cyclic-AMP Phosphodiesterases - genetics
Adult
Aged
Body Height
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Neoplasms - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk
Thyroid Diseases - physiopathology
Thyroid Gland - physiopathology
Thyroxine - blood
Triiodothyronine - blood
Abstract
High serum thyrotropin (TSH) levels predict cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recently several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with TSH levels have been identified, one of them being the rs4704397 SNP in the phosphodiesterase 8B (PDE8B) gene. If the relation between thyroid function and CVD is causal, one could also expect rs4704397 genotypes to predict CVD and possibly health in general.
DNA was prepared and genotyping performed for rs4704397 in subjects who participated in the fourth survey of the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995 and who were registered with the endpoints myocardial infarction (MI), type 2 diabetes (T2DM), cancer, or death, as well as a randomly selected control group. Similarly, genotyping was performed in subjects who had participated in clinical trials where serum TSH, free T4 (fT4), and free T3 (fT3) were measured.
From the Tromsø Study, 8938 subjects without thyroid disease or thyroid medication were successfully genotyped for rs4704397. Among these, 2098 were registered with MI, 1025 with T2DM, 2748 with cancer, and 3592 had died. The minor homozygote genotype (A:A) had a median serum TSH level that was 0.29?mIU/L higher than in the major homozygote genotype (G:G). The A:A genotype had a significantly increased risk of MI as compared to the G:G genotype (1.14 [1.00-1.29], hazard ratio [confidence interval], Cox regression with adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index). No significant associations were seen with the other endpoints or CVD risk factors. Furthermore, subjects with the G:G genotype were significantly taller than subjects with the A:A genotype (mean difference 1.5?cm). In 584 subjects with serum TSH, fT4, and fT3 measurements, the subjects with the A:A genotype had significantly higher serum TSH and nonsignificantly lower serum fT3 (mean difference 0.15?pmol/L) levels than subjects with the G:G genotype.
rs4704397 is associated with thyroid function, risk of MI, and body height. However, confirmation in other cohorts is needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.
PubMed ID
23941514 View in PubMed
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Serum calcium and the calcium-sensing receptor polymorphism rs17251221 in relation to coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer and mortality: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108671
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2013 Jul;28(7):569-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Rolf Jorde
Henrik Schirmer
Inger Njølstad
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Ellisiv Bøgeberg Mathiesen
Elena Kamycheva
Yngve Figenschau
Guri Grimnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, 9038, Tromsö, Norway. rolf.jorde@unn.no
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2013 Jul;28(7):569-78
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Calcium - blood
Coronary Disease - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Receptors, Calcium-Sensing - genetics
Risk factors
Abstract
Serum calcium measured in 27,158 subjects in 1994 and the calcium-sensing receptor polymorphism rs17251221 genotyped in 9,404 subjects were related to cardiovascular risk factors, incident myocardial infarction (MI), type 2 diabetes (T2DM), cancer and death during follow-up until 2008-2010. In a Cox regression model with adjustment for age, gender, smoking and body mass index, subjects with serum calcium 2.50-2.60 mmol/L had a significantly increased risk of incident MI [n = 1,802, hazards ratio (HR) 1.40, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.18, 1.66] and T2DM (n = 705, HR 1.49, 95 % CI 1.15, 1.94) and a significantly reduced risk of cancer (n = 2,222, HR 0.73, 95 % CI 0.62, 0.86) as compared to subjects with serum calcium 2.20-2.29 mmol/L. For rs17251221 there was a mean difference in serum calcium of 0.05 mmol/L between major and minor homozygote genotypes. No consistent, significant relation between rs17251221 and risk factors or the major hard endpoints were found. The minor homozygote genotype (high serum calcium) had a significant twofold increased risk (HR 2.32, 95 % CI 1.24, 4.36) for prostate cancer, as compared to the major homozygote. This may be clinically important if confirmed in other cohorts.
PubMed ID
23860708 View in PubMed
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