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Association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and symptoms of respiratory tract infection in a Norwegian population: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257672
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Apr;17(4):780-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Steinar Robertsen
Guri Grimnes
Hasse Melbye
Author Affiliation
1 General Practice Research Unit, Department of Community Medicine, MH-building, Faculty of Health Science, University of Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Apr;17(4):780-6
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Infections - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested anti-infection effects of vitamin D, although the associations reported between vitamin D (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration) and respiratory tract infection (RTI) are conflicting. The main aim of the present study was to explore this association in a Norwegian population.
We examined the association between serum 25(OH)D and recent RTI symptoms in 6350 middle-aged and elderly participants in the Tromsø Study 6. The main outcome measurement was self-reported RTI symptoms in the previous week.
Tromsø, Norway, 69 °N.
Six thousand three hundred and fifty middle-aged and elderly residents of Tromsø.
Of the 6350 included, 791 (12.5%) reported RTI symptoms in the previous week. We classified serum 25(OH)D concentrations into quartiles and adjusted the data for current smoking habit and month of attendance. The prevalence of RTI symptoms did not increase with decreasing serum 25(OH)D level, was highest in quartile 3 (15.0%) followed by quartile 4 (12.4%), and was lowest in quartiles 1 and 2 (11.1% and 11.4%). There was no trend for increasing duration of illness with decreasing serum 25(OH)D. The prevalence of RTI symptoms was not significantly associated with the intake of fish, n-3 capsules or vitamin and/or mineral supplements, or sun exposure. Only use of cod-liver oil or fish oil capsules daily or sometimes was significantly associated with fewer RTI symptoms during the preceding 7 d (P = 0.04).
Low serum 25(OH)D was not associated with increased prevalence of recent RTI symptoms. Our findings do not support the idea that vitamin D supplementation can reduce the incidence of RTI in Norway.
PubMed ID
23659381 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between polymorphisms related to calcium metabolism and human height: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126446
Source
Ann Hum Genet. 2012 May;76(3):200-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Rolf Jorde
Johan Svartberg
Ragnar Martin Joakimsen
Guri Grimnes
Author Affiliation
Tromsø Endocrine Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. rolf.jorde@unn.no
Source
Ann Hum Genet. 2012 May;76(3):200-10
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Height - genetics
Calcium - blood - metabolism
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Phosphates - blood
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptors, Calcitriol - genetics
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
A number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to height have been detected. Calcium metabolism is important for the skeleton and accordingly also for adult height. Therefore, in the present study, nine SNPs related to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), calcium, phosphate and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were related to height in 9471 subjects. Relation with height was evaluated with linear regression for trend across SNP genotypes with age and gender as covariates. After correcting for multiple testing, significant associations with height were found for two SNPs related to the VDR gene (rs1544410 (Bsml) and rs7975232 (Apal)), one SNP related to serum 25(OH)D (rs3829251 at the DHCR7/NADSYN1 gene), one SNP related to serum calcium (rs1459015 at the PTH gene) and one SNP related to serum phosphate (rs1697421 at the ALPL gene). For rs3829251, the mean differences in height between major and minor homozygotes were 1.5-2.0 cm (P
PubMed ID
22390397 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bone mineral density at the hip and its relation to fat mass and lean mass in adolescents: the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294684
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2018 01 19; 19(1):21
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-19-2018
Author
Anne Winther
Lone Jørgensen
Luai Awad Ahmed
Tore Christoffersen
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Guri Grimnes
Rolf Jorde
Ole Andreas Nilsen
Elaine Dennison
Nina Emaus
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurosciences, Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Services, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. anne.winther@unn.no.
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2018 01 19; 19(1):21
Date
01-19-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Adipose Tissue - diagnostic imaging - physiology
Adolescent
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - physiology
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Life Style
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pelvic Bones - diagnostic imaging - physiology
Abstract
Positive association between body weight and bone mass is well established, and the concept of body mass index (BMI) is associated with higher areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and reduced fracture risk. BMI, that comprises both fat mass (FM) and lean mass (LM) may contribute to peak bone mass achievement in different ways. This study explored the influence of body composition in terms of total body LM and FM on hip aBMD-values in adolescence.
In 2010/2011, 93% of the region's first-year upper-secondary school students (15-17 years old) in Tromsø, Norway attended the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures. Areal BMD at femoral neck (aBMDFN) and total hip (aBMDTH) (g/cm2), total body LM and FM (g) were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Height and weight were measured, and BMI calculated. Lifestyle variables were collected by self-administered questionnaires and interviews, including questions on time spent on leisure time physical activity. Stratified analyses of covariance and regression models included 395 girls and 363 boys. Crude results were adjusted for age, height, sexual maturation, physical activity levels, vitamin D levels, calcium intake, alcohol consumption and smoking habits.
Unadjusted distribution indicated higher aBMD-levels at higher LM-levels in both genders (p?
Notes
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2016 Apr;27(4):1281-386 PMID 26856587
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 May;14(5):819-25 PMID 16855191
Cites: J Youth Adolesc. 1988 Apr;17(2):117-33 PMID 24277579
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 May;19(5):595-606 PMID 17965817
Cites: Bone. 2000 Aug;27(2):203-7 PMID 10913912
Cites: Obes Res. 2002 Jan;10(1):56-60 PMID 11786602
Cites: J Bone Miner Metab. 2007;25(6):423-30 PMID 17968496
Cites: J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Jun;13(6):571-90 PMID 10905381
Cites: Bone. 2004 Nov;35(5):1169-79 PMID 15542043
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Jan;99(1):30-8 PMID 24384013
Cites: Bone. 2014 Jul;64:298-302 PMID 24792957
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2014 Apr;25(4):1297-304 PMID 24326885
Cites: Arch Biochem Biophys. 2010 Nov 1;503(1):20-7 PMID 20599663
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(7):593-602 PMID 25053469
Cites: Nutrients. 2013 Jun 06;5(6):2047-61 PMID 23743968
Cites: Circulation. 1968 Dec;38(6):1104-15 PMID 5721960
Cites: Arch Osteoporos. 2017 Dec;12 (1):37 PMID 28389986
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Nov;16(11):1330-8 PMID 15928804
Cites: BMJ. 1996 May 18;312(7041):1254-9 PMID 8634613
Cites: J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2005 Jul-Sep;5(3):239-54 PMID 16172515
Cites: Bone. 2015 May;74:146-52 PMID 25652209
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Jun;16(6):581-9 PMID 15616758
Cites: Arch Osteoporos. 2014;9:185 PMID 24893722
Cites: Rheumatol Int. 2012 Sep;32(9):2737-43 PMID 21809005
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2017 May;100(5):500-513 PMID 28013362
Cites: Compr Physiol. 2013 Jul;3(3):1337-62 PMID 23897689
Cites: Bone. 2010 Feb;46(2):294-305 PMID 19840876
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2011 Aug;26(8):1729-39 PMID 21520276
Cites: J Clin Densitom. 2008 Apr-Jun;11(2):276-82 PMID 18158262
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Jan;92(1):143-7 PMID 17047019
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Oct;80(4):966-72 PMID 15447907
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Jul;91(7):2534-41 PMID 16621904
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(12):985-1009 PMID 11256898
Cites: Bone. 2009 May;44(5):752-7 PMID 19103314
Cites: Hormones (Athens). 2013 Apr-Jun;12(2):214-23 PMID 23933690
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2006;17(3):337-47 PMID 16331359
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015 Apr 22;5(6):e006665 PMID 26063563
Cites: Bone. 2012 Feb;50(2):457-66 PMID 21619952
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Jan;19(1):29-38 PMID 17660933
Cites: Sports Med. 2006;36(9):723-32 PMID 16937949
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2013 Dec;8(6):418-27 PMID 23447431
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2003 Jul;14(7):539-47 PMID 12844213
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Oct 16;288(15):1889-97 PMID 12377088
Cites: Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009 Mar;105(5):759-64 PMID 19096868
Cites: Maturitas. 2008 Feb 20;59(2):191-200 PMID 18221845
PubMed ID
29351755 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bone mineral density at the hip and its relation to fat mass and lean mass in adolescents: the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289232
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2018 01 19; 19(1):21
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-19-2018
Author
Anne Winther
Lone Jørgensen
Luai Awad Ahmed
Tore Christoffersen
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Guri Grimnes
Rolf Jorde
Ole Andreas Nilsen
Elaine Dennison
Nina Emaus
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurosciences, Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Services, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. anne.winther@unn.no.
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2018 01 19; 19(1):21
Date
01-19-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Positive association between body weight and bone mass is well established, and the concept of body mass index (BMI) is associated with higher areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and reduced fracture risk. BMI, that comprises both fat mass (FM) and lean mass (LM) may contribute to peak bone mass achievement in different ways. This study explored the influence of body composition in terms of total body LM and FM on hip aBMD-values in adolescence.
In 2010/2011, 93% of the region's first-year upper-secondary school students (15-17 years old) in Tromsø, Norway attended the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures. Areal BMD at femoral neck (aBMDFN) and total hip (aBMDTH) (g/cm2), total body LM and FM (g) were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Height and weight were measured, and BMI calculated. Lifestyle variables were collected by self-administered questionnaires and interviews, including questions on time spent on leisure time physical activity. Stratified analyses of covariance and regression models included 395 girls and 363 boys. Crude results were adjusted for age, height, sexual maturation, physical activity levels, vitamin D levels, calcium intake, alcohol consumption and smoking habits.
Unadjusted distribution indicated higher aBMD-levels at higher LM-levels in both genders (p?
Notes
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2016 Apr;27(4):1281-386 PMID 26856587
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 May;14(5):819-25 PMID 16855191
Cites: J Youth Adolesc. 1988 Apr;17(2):117-33 PMID 24277579
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 May;19(5):595-606 PMID 17965817
Cites: Bone. 2000 Aug;27(2):203-7 PMID 10913912
Cites: Obes Res. 2002 Jan;10(1):56-60 PMID 11786602
Cites: J Bone Miner Metab. 2007;25(6):423-30 PMID 17968496
Cites: J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Jun;13(6):571-90 PMID 10905381
Cites: Bone. 2004 Nov;35(5):1169-79 PMID 15542043
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Jan;99(1):30-8 PMID 24384013
Cites: Bone. 2014 Jul;64:298-302 PMID 24792957
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2014 Apr;25(4):1297-304 PMID 24326885
Cites: Arch Biochem Biophys. 2010 Nov 1;503(1):20-7 PMID 20599663
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(7):593-602 PMID 25053469
Cites: Nutrients. 2013 Jun 06;5(6):2047-61 PMID 23743968
Cites: Circulation. 1968 Dec;38(6):1104-15 PMID 5721960
Cites: Arch Osteoporos. 2017 Dec;12 (1):37 PMID 28389986
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Nov;16(11):1330-8 PMID 15928804
Cites: BMJ. 1996 May 18;312(7041):1254-9 PMID 8634613
Cites: J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2005 Jul-Sep;5(3):239-54 PMID 16172515
Cites: Bone. 2015 May;74:146-52 PMID 25652209
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2005 Jun;16(6):581-9 PMID 15616758
Cites: Arch Osteoporos. 2014;9:185 PMID 24893722
Cites: Rheumatol Int. 2012 Sep;32(9):2737-43 PMID 21809005
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2017 May;100(5):500-513 PMID 28013362
Cites: Compr Physiol. 2013 Jul;3(3):1337-62 PMID 23897689
Cites: Bone. 2010 Feb;46(2):294-305 PMID 19840876
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2011 Aug;26(8):1729-39 PMID 21520276
Cites: J Clin Densitom. 2008 Apr-Jun;11(2):276-82 PMID 18158262
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Jan;92(1):143-7 PMID 17047019
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Oct;80(4):966-72 PMID 15447907
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Jul;91(7):2534-41 PMID 16621904
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(12):985-1009 PMID 11256898
Cites: Bone. 2009 May;44(5):752-7 PMID 19103314
Cites: Hormones (Athens). 2013 Apr-Jun;12(2):214-23 PMID 23933690
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2006;17(3):337-47 PMID 16331359
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015 Apr 22;5(6):e006665 PMID 26063563
Cites: Bone. 2012 Feb;50(2):457-66 PMID 21619952
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2008 Jan;19(1):29-38 PMID 17660933
Cites: Sports Med. 2006;36(9):723-32 PMID 16937949
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2013 Dec;8(6):418-27 PMID 23447431
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2003 Jul;14(7):539-47 PMID 12844213
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Oct 16;288(15):1889-97 PMID 12377088
Cites: Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009 Mar;105(5):759-64 PMID 19096868
Cites: Maturitas. 2008 Feb 20;59(2):191-200 PMID 18221845
PubMed ID
29351755 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bone mineral density at the hip in Norwegian women and men--prevalence of osteoporosis depends on chosen references: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151994
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2009;24(6):321-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Nina Emaus
Tone K Omsland
Luai Awad Ahmed
Guri Grimnes
Monica Sneve
Gro K Berntsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromso, Norway. nina.emaus@ism.uit.no
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2009;24(6):321-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density - physiology
Female
Hip - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Abstract
This study describes bone mineral density (BMD) and the prevalence of osteoporosis in women and men between 30-89 years in an unselected population. BMD was measured in g/cm(2) at total hip and femoral neck by dual-energy-X-ray absorptiometry in 3,094 women and 2,132 men in the 2001 Tromsø Study. BMD levels were significantly explained by age and declined progressively in both sexes from middle into old age, with highest decline in women. With osteoporosis defined as a T-score of two and a half standard deviation below the young adult mean BMD, the prevalence at the total hip in subjects above 70 years was 6.9% in men and 15.3% in women, respectively, using the Lunar reference material for T-score calculations. The prevalence increased significantly to 7.3% in men and 19.5% in women, when T-scores were calculated on basis of the young adult mean BMD (age group 30-39 years) in the study population. At the femoral neck, prevalence of osteoporosis increased from 13.5 to 18.5% in men, and from 20.4 to 35.2% in women above 70 years, respectively, depending on how T-scores were calculated. The study highlights the challenges with fixed diagnostic levels when measuring normally distributed physiologic parameters. Although BMD only partly explains fracture risk, future studies should evaluate which calculations give optimal fracture prediction.
PubMed ID
19296062 View in PubMed
Less detail

C3-epimerization of 25-hydroxyvitamin D increases with increasing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and shows a high degree of tracking over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290039
Source
Clin Biochem. 2018 Apr; 54:61-67
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Julia M Kubiak
Guri Grimnes
Kevin D Cashman
Elena Kamycheva
Kirsten Dowling
Zuzana Skrabáková
Rolf Jorde
Author Affiliation
Tromsø Endocrine Research Group, Institute of Clinical Medicine, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø, Norway; Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, 9038 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: julia.magdalena.kubiak@unn.no.
Source
Clin Biochem. 2018 Apr; 54:61-67
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Evaluate the effects of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels, vitamin D binding protein (DBP) and genetic factors on C3-epimerization of 25(OH)D and follow the tracking of the epimer during one year.
Cross-sectional and longitudinal study.
Data from eight previously conducted, Tromsø based studies (3 observational, 5 randomized controlled trials) were combined. 25(OH)D serum samples were re-analyzed with a LC-MS/MS method that also resolves and measures the metabolite C3-epi-25(OH)D3. Data on vitamin D binding protein (DBP) phenotype (based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs4588 and rs7041) and genetic determinants for serum 25(OH)D (SNPs rs2282679, rs10741657, rs3829251 and rs6013897) were collected where available.
2219 subjects were included. Median (5th, 95th percentiles) baseline serum values of 25(OH)D3, C3-epi-25(OH)D3, and %-C3-epi-25(OH)D3 were 49.1 (22.1, 92.8)?nmol/L, 2.3 (0.9, 6.0)?nmol/L and 4.4 (2.7, 8.4) %, respectively. The highest baseline values were 230.5?nmol/L for 25(OH)D3, 79.7?nmol/L for C3-epi-25(OH)D3 and 48.2% for %-C3-epi-25(OH)D3. There was a strong correlation between serum 25(OH)D3 and C3-epi-25(OH)D3. The %-C3-epi-25(OH)D3 value increased with increasing serum 25(OH)D3, but leveled off at ~7% at a 25(OH)D3 concentration of ~120-140?nmol/L. There was a significant degree of tracking for %-C3-epi-25(OH)D3 (correlation coefficient rho between baseline and 1-year values 0.39, P?
PubMed ID
29476721 View in PubMed
Less detail

C3-epimerization of 25-hydroxyvitamin D increases with increasing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and shows a high degree of tracking over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293019
Source
Clin Biochem. 2018 Apr; 54:61-67
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Julia M Kubiak
Guri Grimnes
Kevin D Cashman
Elena Kamycheva
Kirsten Dowling
Zuzana Skrabáková
Rolf Jorde
Author Affiliation
Tromsø Endocrine Research Group, Institute of Clinical Medicine, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø, Norway; Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, 9038 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: julia.magdalena.kubiak@unn.no.
Source
Clin Biochem. 2018 Apr; 54:61-67
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Time Factors
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - pharmacokinetics
Vitamin D-Binding Protein - blood
Abstract
Evaluate the effects of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels, vitamin D binding protein (DBP) and genetic factors on C3-epimerization of 25(OH)D and follow the tracking of the epimer during one year.
Cross-sectional and longitudinal study.
Data from eight previously conducted, Tromsø based studies (3 observational, 5 randomized controlled trials) were combined. 25(OH)D serum samples were re-analyzed with a LC-MS/MS method that also resolves and measures the metabolite C3-epi-25(OH)D3. Data on vitamin D binding protein (DBP) phenotype (based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs4588 and rs7041) and genetic determinants for serum 25(OH)D (SNPs rs2282679, rs10741657, rs3829251 and rs6013897) were collected where available.
2219 subjects were included. Median (5th, 95th percentiles) baseline serum values of 25(OH)D3, C3-epi-25(OH)D3, and %-C3-epi-25(OH)D3 were 49.1 (22.1, 92.8)?nmol/L, 2.3 (0.9, 6.0)?nmol/L and 4.4 (2.7, 8.4) %, respectively. The highest baseline values were 230.5?nmol/L for 25(OH)D3, 79.7?nmol/L for C3-epi-25(OH)D3 and 48.2% for %-C3-epi-25(OH)D3. There was a strong correlation between serum 25(OH)D3 and C3-epi-25(OH)D3. The %-C3-epi-25(OH)D3 value increased with increasing serum 25(OH)D3, but leveled off at ~7% at a 25(OH)D3 concentration of ~120-140?nmol/L. There was a significant degree of tracking for %-C3-epi-25(OH)D3 (correlation coefficient rho between baseline and 1-year values 0.39, P?
PubMed ID
29476721 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes and tracking of bone mineral density in late adolescence: the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281654
Source
Arch Osteoporos. 2017 Dec;12(1):37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Ole Andreas Nilsen
Luai Awad Ahmed
Anne Winther
Tore Christoffersen
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Guri Grimnes
Elaine Dennison
Nina Emaus
Source
Arch Osteoporos. 2017 Dec;12(1):37
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) predicts future fracture risk. This study explores the development of aBMD and associated factors in Norwegian adolescents. Our results indicate a high degree of tracking of aBMD levels in adolescence. Anthropometric measures and lifestyle factors were associated with deviation from tracking.
Norway has one of the highest reported incidences of hip fractures. Maximization of peak bone mass may reduce future fracture risk. The main aims of this study were to describe changes in bone mineral levels over 2?years in Norwegian adolescents aged 15-17?years at baseline, to examine the degree of tracking of aBMD during this period, and to identify baseline predictors associated with positive deviation from tracking.
In 2010-2011, all first year upper secondary school students in Troms? were invited to the Fit Futures study and 1038 adolescents (93%) attended. We measured femoral neck (FN), total hip (TH), and total body (TB) aBMD as g/cm(2) by DXA. Two years later, in 2012-2013, we invited all participants to a follow-up survey, providing 688 repeated measures of aBMD.
aBMD increased significantly (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
28389986 View in PubMed
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Cohort profile: Norwegian Epidemiologic Osteoporosis Studies (NOREPOS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261800
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Dec;42(8):804-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Anne Johanne Søgaard
Haakon E Meyer
Nina Emaus
Guri Grimnes
Clara Gram Gjesdal
Siri Forsmo
Berit Schei
Grethe S Tell
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Dec;42(8):804-13
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper describes the history, purpose, data collection and contributions in the research collaboration Norwegian Osteoporosis Epidemiologic Studies (NOREPOS).
NOREPOS encompasses almost 85,000 bone mineral density measurements within Cohort of Norway and data on almost 140,000 hip fractures in Norway 1994-2008. Included are anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, lipids and glucose, and 50 standard questions on sociodemographic factors, diseases and risk factors. Blood samples/DNA are stored. The main research question posed in NOREPOS is why hip fracture rates in Norway are the highest in the world. Data on hip fractures 2009-2013 will be added in 2014.
Main findings include: Every hour a Norwegian suffers a hip fracture; hip fracture incidence rates declined after 1999; only 16% of patients used anti-osteoporosis drugs 1 year after hip fracture; 25% of patients died within 1 year after the fracture; 12% suffered a new hip fracture within 10 years; rural dwellers had lower hip and forearm fracture incidence than city dwellers; magnesium in tap water may be protective whereas bacterial contamination, cadmium and lead may be harmful to bone health; low serum vitamin D and E levels were associated with higher hip fracture risk; vitamin A was not associated with fracture risk; and abdominal obesity increased the risk of hip fracture when BMI was accounted for.
NOREPOS encompasses a unique source of information for aetiological research, genetic studies as well as for biomarkers of osteoporosis and fractures. Because of the increasing number of elderly people in Europe, hip fractures will continue to pose an international public health and health care challenge.
PubMed ID
25278275 View in PubMed
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Cross-sectional and longitudinal relation between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and body mass index: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145060
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2010 Oct;49(7):401-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Rolf Jorde
Monica Sneve
Nina Emaus
Yngve Figenschau
Guri Grimnes
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. rolf.jorde@unn.no
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2010 Oct;49(7):401-7
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Intervention Studies
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - metabolism
Placebos - metabolism
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood - metabolism
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood
Abstract
The serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels are lower in obese than lean subjects. The present study examines the cross-sectional and longitudinal relations between body mass index (BMI) and serum 25(OH)D, and the serum 25(OH)D response to vitamin D supplementation in relation to BMI.
The Troms? study is a longitudinal population-based multipurpose study. The fourth survey was conducted in 1994 and the sixth in 2008. The intervention study was a 1-year placebo-controlled randomized intervention trial, where the results from the 93 subjects given 40,000?IU per week are presented.
A total of 10,229 subjects were included in the 2008 cross-sectional study. There was a significant negative association between serum 25(OH)D levels and BMI which was also present during the winter months. Serum 25(OH)D levels varied through seasons, but not BMI. In the longitudinal study from 1994 to 2008 which included 2,656 subjects, change in BMI was a significant negative predictor of change in 25(OH)D. In the intervention study, there was a significant and negative correlation between BMI and serum 25(OH)D both at baseline and at the end of the study. The increase in serum 25(OH)D after 1?year was significantly and inversely related to baseline BMI.
We have confirmed the strong association between serum 25(OH)D and BMI. The very obese need higher vitamin D doses than lean subjects to achieve the same serum 25(OH)D levels.
PubMed ID
20204652 View in PubMed
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