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A 10-year follow-up study on subjective well-being and relationships to person-environment (P-E) fit and activity of daily living (ADL) dependence of older Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154920
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Jul-Aug;49(1):e16-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Monica Werngren-Elgström
Gunilla Carlsson
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Jul-Aug;49(1):e16-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Environment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
In order to investigate how well-being and ill health is affected by the process of aging, the main aim was to investigate these self-perceived aspects of health over a 10-year period among older Swedish adults. The aim was also to study how these aspects correlated with objectively assessed functional limitations, use of mobility device, person-environment (P-E) fit (also denoted accessibility), problems in housing, and activity of daily living (ADL) dependence. Using the Swedish national population register, a baseline sample of persons aged 75-84 years was identified. Out of the 133 participants at baseline (1994), the 31 participants still available 10 years later were included. The data were collected by means of interview and observation at home visits. Overall, the participants rated their subjective well-being as high and a stable prevalence of ill-health symptoms over time was reported. Changes in subjective well-being as related to changes in functional aspects seem to mainly occur earlier in the aging process, while as time goes by these relations weaken. ADL dependence, however, is more influential in more advanced age. The results confirm the complexity of the construct of health. A main contribution is that the results shed light on the importance of taking the impact of environmental factors into consideration.
PubMed ID
18829123 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding: An existential challenge-women's lived experiences of initiating breastfeeding within the context of early home discharge in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100192
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2010;5(3)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Lina Palmér
Gunilla Carlsson
Margareta Mollberg
Maria Nyström
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2010;5(3)
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
For most Swedish women, breastfeeding is an essential part of the childbearing period. Yet, the meaning of breastfeeding from women's perspective is scantily explored. Therefore, the aim of this study is to describe women's lived experiences of initiating breastfeeding within the context of early home discharge. Eight women, two primiparous, and six multiparous were interviewed within 2 months after birth. A reflective lifeworld research design based on phenomenological philosophy was used during the data gathering and data analysis. The results show that the phenomenon, initiating breastfeeding, in spite of good conditions, i.e., early home discharge, is complex and entails an existential challenge. The essential meaning of the phenomenon is conceptualized as, "A movement from a bodily performance to an embodied relation with the infant and oneself as a mother." This pattern is further described in its five constituents: "Fascination in the first encounter," "Balancing the unknown," "Devoting oneself and enduring the situation," "Seeking confirmation in the unique," and "Having the entire responsibility." Caring for women initiating breastfeeding entails, from a caring science perspective, to help the mother meet insecurity and strengthen confidence to trust her ability to breastfeed the newborn infant. According to these findings, it is suggested in the discussion that it is time for health care professionals to reject the idea of breastfeeding merely as meals or eating for the infant. Instead, they ought to embrace its origin, namely as a way to closeness between mother and infant.
PubMed ID
20978548 View in PubMed
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First-time fathers' experiences of childbirth--a phenomenological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140001
Source
Midwifery. 2011 Dec;27(6):848-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Åsa Premberg
Gunilla Carlsson
Anna-Lena Hellström
Marie Berg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Box 457, 40530 Göteborg, Sweden. asa.premberg@gu.se
Source
Midwifery. 2011 Dec;27(6):848-53
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Object Attachment
Parturition - psychology
Postnatal Care - methods
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - methods
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To describe fathers' experiences during childbirth.
Qualitative method with phenomenological lifeworld approach. A re-enactment interview method, with open-ended questions analysed with a phenomenological method, was used.
10 First-time fathers from two hospitals were interviewed four to six weeks after childbirth in Southwest Sweden during the autumn of 2008.
The essential meaning of first-time fathers' lived experience of childbirth was described as an interwoven process pendulating between euphoria and agony. The four themes constituting the essence was: 'a process into the unknown', 'a mutually shared experience', 'to guard and support the woman' and 'in an exposed position with hidden strong emotions'.
Childbirth was experienced as a mutually shared process for the couple. The fathers' high involvement in childbirth, in cooperation with the midwife, and being engaged in support and care for his partner in her suffering is fulfilling for both partners, although the experience of the woman's pain, fear of the unknown and the gendered preconceptions of masculine hegemony can be difficult to bear for the father-to-be.
In order to maintain and strengthen childbirth as a mutually shared experience for the couple, the father needs to be recognised and supported as a parent-to-be. Midwives have to acknowledge fathers as valued participants and support their significant position.
PubMed ID
20956030 View in PubMed
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Health factors in the everyday life and work of public sector employees in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125037
Source
Work. 2012;42(3):321-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lena-Karin Erlandsson
Gunilla Carlsson
Vibeke Horstmann
Gunvor Gard
Eva Holmström
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Lena-Karin.Erlandsson@med.lu.se
Source
Work. 2012;42(3):321-30
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Public Sector - manpower
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sleep - physiology
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Social Class
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Task Performance and Analysis
Travel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Workload - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim was to explore aspects of everyday life in addition to established risk factors and their relationship to subjective health and well-being among public sector employees in Sweden. Gainful employment impact on employees' health and well-being, but work is only one part of everyday life and a broader perspective is essential in order to identify health-related factors.
Data were obtained from employees at six Social Insurance Offices in Sweden, 250 women and 50 men.
A questionnaire based on established instruments and questions specifically designed for this study was used. Relationships between five factors of everyday life, subjective health and well-being were investigated by means of multivariate logistic regression analysis.
The final model revealed a limited importance of certain work-related factors. A general satisfaction with everyday activities, a stress-free environment and general control in addition to not having monotonous movements at work were found to be factors explaining 46.3% of subjective good health and well-being.
A person's entire activity pattern, including work, is important, and strategies for promoting health should take into account the person's situation as a whole. The interplay between risk and health factors is not clear and further research is warranted.
PubMed ID
22523024 View in PubMed
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The paradox of being both needed and rejected: the existential meaning of being closely related to a person with bipolar disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125599
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2012 Apr;33(4):200-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Marie Rusner
Gunilla Carlsson
David Arthur Brunt
Maria Nyström
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden. marie.rusner@hb.se
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2012 Apr;33(4):200-8
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Bipolar Disorder - nursing - psychology
Caregivers - psychology
Conflict (Psychology)
Existentialism
Family Relations
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Rejection (Psychology)
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to elucidate the existential meaning of being closely related to a person with bipolar disorder. A qualitative, descriptive, and explorative design with a phenomenological meaning-oriented analysis was used. The findings reveal a paradoxical, existential exposure of close relatives to a person with bipolar disorder, being both needed and rejected whilst being overshadowed by the specific changeable nature of bipolar disorder. Psychiatric health care services are recommended to consider changes in attitudes and structures that may facilitate close relatives' participation in the care and treatment of persons with bipolar disorder.
PubMed ID
22468585 View in PubMed
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Patients longing for authentic personal care: a phenomenological study of violent encounters in psychiatric settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76276
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2006 Apr;27(3):287-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Gunilla Carlsson
Karin Dahlberg
Margaretha Ekebergh
Helena Dahlberg
Author Affiliation
Borås University College, Department of Health Sciences, Allégatan, Borås, Sweden. gunilla.carlsson@hb.se
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2006 Apr;27(3):287-305
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Empathy
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Prisoners - psychology
Sweden
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
This article focuses on patients' violence against caregivers. Several studies show that violence and threats within the health care setting are an increasing problem. Encounters that become violent have been the issue of many debates but the phenomenon is still not fully understood. It is important to understand the course of events in violent encounters, both for the sake of the patients and the caregivers' well-being. The aim of this study was to describe the essence of violent encounters, as experienced by nine patients within psychiatric care. Guided by a phenomenological method, data were analyzed within a reflective life-world approach. The findings explicate violent encounters characterized by a tension between "authentic personal" and "detached impersonal" caring. "Authentic personal" patients are encountered in an undisguised, straightforward, and open way, and they sense unrestricted respect that caregivers would show another human being. In these encounters violence does not develop well. However, in caring that is "detached impersonal," the encounters are experienced by the patients as uncontrolled and insecure. These encounters are full of risks and potential violence.
PubMed ID
16484171 View in PubMed
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Person--environment fit predicts falls in older adults better than the consideration of environmental hazards only.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151258
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2009 Jun;23(6):558-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Susanne Iwarsson
Vibeke Horstmann
Gunilla Carlsson
Frank Oswald
Hans-Werner Wahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. susanne.iwarsson@med.lu.se
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2009 Jun;23(6):558-67
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Architectural Accessibility
Environment
Female
Germany
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Latvia
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Self-Help Devices - utilization
Sweden
Abstract
To test the hypotheses that the empirical consideration of objective person-environment fit in the home environment is a stronger predictor of indoor falls among older adults than the assessment of environmental barriers only, and that perceived aspects of home play a role as predictors for falls.
Survey study with data collection at home visits, followed up by self-reports about falls at home visits one year later.
Urban districts in Sweden, Germany, Latvia.
Eight hundred and thirty-four single-living, older adults (75-89 years), in ordinary housing.
An assessment of objective person-environment fit in the home environment (housing enabler), a self-rating of the perceived home environment (usability in my home) and retrospective self-reports on indoor falls.
The participants reporting falls tended to be frailer than the non-fallers. The number of environmental barriers in the home was similar for the fallers and non-fallers; the magnitude of person-environment fit problems was higher among the fallers. The person-environment fit problem variable was a stronger fall predictor (odds ratio (OR) = 1.025; P=0.037) than number of environmental barriers (n.s.), even after controlling for confounders. Fallers also experienced lower usability of their home.
The results suggest that much of the inconclusiveness of the data in the relationship between environmental hazards and falls in the previous falls literature could be due to the neglect of person-environment fit assessment. The effectiveness of environmental interventions based on the notion of person-environment fit compared with traditional home hazard checklists remains to be tested.
PubMed ID
19403554 View in PubMed
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Prerequisites for sustainable care improvement using the reflective team as a work model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260416
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:23934
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lise-Lotte Jonasson
Gunilla Carlsson
Maria Nyström
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:23934
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Evidence-Based Nursing
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Several work models for care improvement have been developed in order to meet the requirement for evidence-based care. This study examines a work model for reflection, entitled the reflective team (RT). The main idea behind RTs is that caring skills exist among those who work closest to the patients. The team leader (RTL) encourages sustainable care improvement, rooted in research and proven experience, by using a lifeworld perspective to stimulate further reflection and a developmental process leading to research-based caring actions within the team. In order to maintain focus, it is important that the RTL has a clear idea of what sustainable care improvement means, and what the prerequisites are for such improvement. The aim of the present study is, therefore, to explore the prerequisites for improving sustainable care, seeking to answer how RTLs perceive these and use RTs for concrete planning. Nine RTLs were interviewed, and their statements were phenomenographically analysed. The analysis revealed three separate qualitative categories, which describe personal, interpersonal, and structural aspects of the prerequisites. In the discussion, these categories are compared with previous research on reflection, and the conclusion is reached that the optimal conditions for RTs to work, when focussed on sustainable care improvement, occur when the various aspects of the prerequisites are intertwined and become a natural part of the reflective work.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25361530 View in PubMed
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A research-based strategy for managing housing adaptations: study protocol for a quasi-experimental trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271368
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2014;14:602
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lisa Ekstam
Gunilla Carlsson
Carlos Chiatti
Maria H Nilsson
Agneta Malmgren Fänge
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2014;14:602
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Case Management
Disabled Persons
Housing
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life
Safety
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The primary aim of this paper is to describe the design of a project evaluating the effects of using a research-based strategy for managing housing adaptations (HAs). The evaluation targets clients' perspectives in terms of activity, participation, usability, fear of falling, fall incidence, use of mobility devices, and health-related quality of life, and determines the societal effects of HAs in terms of costs. Additional aims of the project are to explore and describe this strategy in relation to experiences and expectations (a) among clients and cohabitants and (b) occupational therapists in ordinary practice.
This study is a quasi-experimental trial applying a multiphase design, combining quantitative and qualitative data. At the experimental sites, the occupational therapists (OTs) apply the intervention, i.e. a standardized research-based strategy for HA case management. At the control site, the occupational therapists are following their regular routine in relation to HA. Three municipalities in south Sweden will be included based on their population, their geographical dispersion, and their similar organizational structures for HA administration. Identical data on outcomes is being collected at all the sites at the same four time points: before the HA and then 3, 6, and 12?months after the HA. The data-collection methods are semi-structured qualitative interviews, observations, clinical assessments, and certificates related to each client's HA.
The intervention in this study has been developed and tested through many years of research and in collaboration with practitioners. This process includes methodological development and testing research aimed at identifying the most important outcomes and research targeting current HA case-management procedures in Swedish municipalities. When the study is completed, the results will be used for further optimization of the practice strategy for HA, in close collaboration with the data-collecting OTs.
No: NCT01960582.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25432718 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.