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Exposure to tobacco smoke in utero and subsequent plasma lipids, ApoB, and CRP among adult women in the MoBa cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122454
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Nov;120(11):1532-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Lea A Cupul-Uicab
Rolv Skjaerven
Kjell Haug
Gregory S Travlos
Ralph E Wilson
Merete Eggesbø
Jane A Hoppin
Kristina W Whitworth
Matthew P Longnecker
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. cupuluicabl@niehs.nih.gov
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Nov;120(11):1532-7
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent findings suggest that maternal smoking during pregnancy may play a role in the development of metabolic alterations in offspring during childhood. However, whether such exposure increases the risk of developing similar metabolic alterations during adulthood is uncertain.
We evaluated the association of in utero exposure to maternal tobacco smoke with plasma lipids, apolipoprotein B (apoB), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in adulthood.
The study was based on a subsample of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and included 479 pregnant women with plasma lipids, apoB, and CRP measurements. Information on in utero exposure to tobacco smoke, personal smoking, and other factors were obtained from the women by a self-completed questionnaire at enrollment, at approximately 17 weeks of gestation.
Women exposed to tobacco smoke in utero had higher triglycerides [10.7% higher; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.9, 17.9] and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) (-1.9 mg/dL; 95% CI: -4.3, 0.5) compared with unexposed women, after adjusting for age, physical activity, education, personal smoking, and current body mass index (BMI). Exposed women were also more likely to have triglycerides = 200 mg/dL [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.3, 5.1] and HDL
Notes
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PubMed ID
22814200 View in PubMed
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Maternal glomerular filtration rate in pregnancy and fetal size.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261338
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(7):e101897
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Nils-Halvdan Morken
Gregory S Travlos
Ralph E Wilson
Merete Eggesbø
Matthew P Longnecker
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(7):e101897
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - blood
Female
Fetal Weight
Gestational Age
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway
Pre-Eclampsia - physiopathology
Pregnancy
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationship of maternal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in pregnancy to fetal size needs to be better characterized as it impacts an ongoing debate about confounding effect of maternal GFR in investigations of important environmental contaminants. We aimed to characterize the size of the association between maternal GFR and infant birth weight.
A sub-cohort of 953 selected women (470 women with and 483 women without preeclampsia) in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort (MoBa), recruited during 2003-2007 were analyzed. GFR in the second trimester was estimated based on plasma creatinine. Birth weight was ascertained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Multivariate linear regression was used to evaluate the association between maternal GFR in second trimester (estimated by the Cockroft-Gault [GFR-CG] and the modification of diet in renal disease [GFR-MDRD] formulas) and infant birth weight. Partial correlation coefficients were also calculated.
Maternal GFR-CG (ß: 0.73 g/ml/min, p?=?0.04) and GFR-MDRD (ß: 0.83 g/ml/min, p?=?0.04) were associated with infant birth weight in models adjusted for maternal weight in kilograms, preeclampsia, and gestational age at delivery (days). Partial correlation coefficients for the association between infant birth weight and GFR were 0.07 for both formulas. Although the birth weight-GFR association was stronger among the women with preeclampsia, the difference from women without preeclampsia was not statistically significant.
These data support an association between GFR during pregnancy and infant birth weight, and indicate that GFR may confound selected epidemiologic associations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25003331 View in PubMed
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Perfluoroalkyl substances and lipid concentrations in plasma during pregnancy among women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106340
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Jan;62:104-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Anne P Starling
Stephanie M Engel
Kristina W Whitworth
David B Richardson
Alison M Stuebe
Julie L Daniels
Line Småstuen Haug
Merete Eggesbø
Georg Becher
Azemira Sabaredzovic
Cathrine Thomsen
Ralph E Wilson
Gregory S Travlos
Jane A Hoppin
Donna D Baird
Matthew P Longnecker
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Jan;62:104-12
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Humans
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Mothers
Norway
Abstract
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are widespread and persistent environmental pollutants. Previous studies, primarily among non-pregnant individuals, suggest positive associations between PFAS levels and certain blood lipids. If there is a causal link between PFAS concentrations and elevated lipids during pregnancy, this may suggest a mechanism by which PFAS exposure leads to certain adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preeclampsia.
This cross-sectional analysis included 891 pregnant women enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child (MoBa) Cohort Study in 2003-2004. Non-fasting plasma samples were obtained at mid-pregnancy and analyzed for nineteen PFASs. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured in plasma. Linear regression was used to quantify associations between each PFAS exposure and each lipid outcome. A multiple PFAS model was also fitted.
Seven PFASs were quantifiable in >50% of samples. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) concentration was associated with total cholesterol, which increased 4.2mg/dL per inter-quartile shift (95% CI=0.8, 7.7) in adjusted models. Five of the seven PFASs studied were positively associated with HDL cholesterol, and all seven had elevated HDL associated with the highest quartile of exposure. Perfluoroundecanoic acid showed the strongest association with HDL: HDL increased 3.7 mg/dL per inter-quartile shift (95% CI=2.5, 4.9).
Plasma concentrations of PFASs were positively associated with HDL cholesterol, and PFOS was positively associated with total cholesterol in this sample of pregnant Norwegian women. While elevated HDL is not an adverse outcome per se, elevated total cholesterol associated with PFASs during pregnancy could be of concern if causal.
PubMed ID
24189199 View in PubMed
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Perfluoroalkyl substances during pregnancy and validated preeclampsia among nulliparous women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104930
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2014 Apr 1;179(7):824-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2014
Author
Anne P Starling
Stephanie M Engel
David B Richardson
Donna D Baird
Line S Haug
Alison M Stuebe
Kari Klungsøyr
Quaker Harmon
Georg Becher
Cathrine Thomsen
Azemira Sabaredzovic
Merete Eggesbø
Jane A Hoppin
Gregory S Travlos
Ralph E Wilson
Lill I Trogstad
Per Magnus
Matthew P Longnecker
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2014 Apr 1;179(7):824-33
Date
Apr-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Caprylates - blood
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Humans
Norway
Parity
Pre-Eclampsia - blood - etiology
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Young Adult
Abstract
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are persistent and ubiquitous environmental contaminants, and human exposure to these substances may be related to preeclampsia, a common pregnancy complication. Previous studies have found serum concentrations of PFAS to be positively associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia in a population with high levels of exposure to perfluorooctanoate. Whether this association exists among pregnant women with background levels of PFAS exposure is unknown. Using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, we carried out a study of nulliparous pregnant women enrolled in 2003-2007 (466 cases, 510 noncases) to estimate associations between PFAS concentrations and an independently validated diagnosis of preeclampsia. We measured levels of 9 PFAS in maternal plasma extracted midpregnancy; statistical analyses were restricted to 7 PFAS that were quantifiable in more than 50% of samples. In proportional hazards models adjusted for maternal age, prepregnancy body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)), educational level, and smoking status, we observed no strongly positive associations between PFAS levels and preeclampsia. We found an inverse association between preeclampsia and the highest quartile of perfluoroundecanoic acid concentration relative to the lowest quartile (hazard ratio = 0.55, 95% confidence interval: 0.38, 0.81). Overall, our findings do not support an increased risk of preeclampsia among nulliparous Norwegian women with background levels of PFAS exposure.
PubMed ID
24557813 View in PubMed
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