Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Outcomes following neonatal patent ductus arteriosus ligation done by pediatric surgeons: a retrospective cohort analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113671
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2013 May;48(5):915-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Katherine Hutchings
Andrea Vasquez
David Price
Brian H Cameron
Saeed Awan
Grant G Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Janeway Children's Hospital, St. John's Newfoundland, NL, Canada, A1B 3V6.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2013 May;48(5):915-8
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - utilization
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Ductus Arteriosus, Patent - drug therapy - mortality - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
General Surgery - education
Gestational Age
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, Pediatric - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - mortality - surgery
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Intraoperative Complications - epidemiology
Ligation - education
Male
Patient Transfer - statistics & numerical data
Pediatrics - education
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Respiration, Artificial - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Tertiary Care Centers - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) ligation in premature infants is an urgent procedure performed by some but not all pediatric surgeons. Proficiency in PDA ligation is not a requirement of Canadian pediatric surgery training. Our purpose was to determine the outcomes of neonatal PDA ligation done by pediatric surgeons.
We performed a retrospective review of premature infants who underwent PDA ligation by pediatric surgeons in 3 Canadian centers from 2005 to 2009. Outcomes were compared to published controls.
The review identified 98 patients with a mean corrected GA and weight at repair of 29 weeks and 1122 g, respectively. There were no intraoperative deaths. The 30-day and inhospital mortality rates were 1% and 5%. Mortality and morbidity were comparable to the published outcomes.
This study documents that a significant number of preterm infant PDA ligations are safely done by pediatric surgeons. To meet the Canadian needs for this service by pediatric surgeons, proficiency in PDA ligation should be considered important in pediatric surgery training programs.
PubMed ID
23701759 View in PubMed
Less detail

Routine pathological evaluation of tissue from inguinal hernias in children is unnecessary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185872
Source
Can J Surg. 2003 Apr;46(2):117-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Grant G Miller
Susan E McDonald
Kris Milbrandt
Rajni Chibbar
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Saskatchewan, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Sask. miller@duke.usask.ca
Source
Can J Surg. 2003 Apr;46(2):117-9
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - economics - utilization
Female
Hernia, Inguinal - economics - pathology
Humans
Male
Saskatchewan
Unnecessary Procedures - economics
Abstract
Because unexpected disease is rare in a child's inguinal hernia sac we decided to investigate the cost of routine pathological evaluation of inguinal hernial sacs in children and the incidence of clinically significant pathological findings.
We searched the health records at the University Hospital, Saskatoon, for patients under 20 years of age who had inguinal hernia repair between 1988 and 1997. For records noting pathology findings of duct-like structures, the operative reports and histology slides were reviewed. Specimens were immunostained for muscle-specific actin. The cost of pathological evaluation was estimated using a provincial physician-billing schedule.
During the study period, there were 488 inguinal hernia repairs in 371 patients under 20 years of age. Of these, 456 (93.4%) specimens were evaluated microscopically. There were 4 (0.88%) cases with unexpected findings diagnosed as epididymis at a cost of Can dollar 6988/case.
The routine histologic evaluation of inguinal hernia sacs in children is an unnecessary expense and should be reserved for select cases at the discretion of the surgeon.
Notes
Cites: Am J Clin Pathol. 1984 Jul;82(1):85-96741877
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1988 Jan;23(1 Pt 2):21-33351722
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1989 May;24(5):483-52544714
Cites: Hum Pathol. 1990 Mar;21(3):339-492312111
Cites: Cancer. 1992 Jun 15;69(12):3008-111591694
Cites: Surgery. 1962 Mar;51:393-40613915570
Cites: Pediatr Pathol. 1994 Nov-Dec;14(6):1043-97855006
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1995 Apr;30(4):624-57595849
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1998 May;33(5):717-89607476
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1998 Jul;33(7):1090-2; discussion 1093-49694100
Cites: Am J Surg Pathol. 1999 Aug;23(8):880-510435556
Cites: J Urol. 1992 Aug;148(2 Pt 2):697-81640549
PubMed ID
12691348 View in PubMed
Less detail

Telehealth provides effective pediatric surgery care to remote locations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190389
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2002 May;37(5):752-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Grant G Miller
Karen Levesque
Author Affiliation
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2002 May;37(5):752-4
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
General Surgery - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Pediatrics - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Saskatchewan
Telemedicine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to document the experience and patient satisfaction with providing pediatric surgery consultations and follow-up appointments to remote locations via audiovisual telecommunications technology.
From January 2000 to April 2001, 16 consecutive pediatric general surgery clinics were reviewed for the type of patient (new or review), the diagnosis, the adequacy and accuracy of the evaluation, and the ability to formulate a plan. In the first year, first-time users were requested to complete a satisfaction survey of 15 questions. Responses to 13 questions were recorded on a 4-point Likert scale, and 2 questions required a "yes" or "no" response.
One hundred eighteen appointments were scheduled. Twenty patients did not show up or cancelled. There were 45 new patient consultations. Thirty-three patients were scheduled for surgery, of which, 21 are completed, and 12 are pending. There were no errors in diagnosis or changes in planned procedures. There were 42 patients seen in 53 follow-up sessions. Thirty-six surveys of a possible 53 were available for analysis. The mean rating of overall treatment experience at Telehealth was 3.47 (95% confidence interval 0.17). One hundred percent responded they would use Telehealth again and would recommend it to another person.
Telehealth is an effective and acceptable way to provide pediatric general surgery clinics to remote locations.
PubMed ID
11987093 View in PubMed
Less detail

Waiting for an operation: parents' perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179151
Source
Can J Surg. 2004 Jun;47(3):179-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Grant G Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Saskatchewan, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Sask. miller@duke.usask.ca
Source
Can J Surg. 2004 Jun;47(3):179-81
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Surgical Procedures, Elective
Urban Population
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To determine parents' attitudes toward and acceptance of waiting times for their child's operation.
Waiting times were measured by a cross-sectional method. A descriptive survey was conducted of families with a child waiting for a non-urgent operation.
A university teaching hospital.
Parents of children (age 6 months and 30% > 12 months. Of the 57 families (64%) who returned completed surveys, 94% reported the wait to be emotionally stressful for the family; 81.5% expected their child's quality of life would improve after the operation. As for length of wait, 83% felt that > 3 months was unacceptable, and 98% > 6 months.
Parents of children waiting for pediatric general surgery operations thought that the need for the operation was significantly more urgent then their classification of elective. They felt that waiting periods should not exceed 3 months. Long waiting periods are stressful for both family and child. Parental perceptions are important when considering strategies for wait-list management.
Notes
Cites: Med J Aust. 1991 Mar 4;154(5):326-82017059
Cites: N Z Med J. 1991 Sep 11;104(919):384-51923079
Cites: N Z Med J. 1992 Jul 8;105(937):266-81620513
Cites: Br J Urol. 1993 Sep;72(3):314-77693292
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 1998 Feb;4(1):63-749524913
Cites: Heart. 1997 Apr;77(4):330-29155611
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1994 Nov;21(11):2101-57869317
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 May 2;162(9):1297-30010813011
Cites: Br J Urol. 1994 Jul;74(1):57-607519113
Comment In: Can J Surg. 2004 Jun;47(3):167-915264376
PubMed ID
15264379 View in PubMed
Less detail