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Adolescents' attention to traditional and graphic tobacco warning labels: an eye-tracking approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137126
Source
J Drug Educ. 2010;40(3):227-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Emily Bylund Peterson
Steven Thomsen
Gordon Lindsay
Kevin John
Author Affiliation
Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA. steven_thomsen@byu.edu
Source
J Drug Educ. 2010;40(3):227-44
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Attention
Canada
Female
Fixation, Ocular
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Pattern Recognition, Visual
Product Labeling
Reading
Smoking - adverse effects - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
United States
Abstract
The objective of this study was determine if the inclusion of Canadian-style graphic images would improve the degree to which adolescents attend to, and subsequently are able to recall, novel warning messages in tobacco magazine advertising. Specifically, our goal was to determine if the inclusion of graphic images would (1) increase visual attention, as measured by eye movement patterns and fixation density, and (2) improve memory for tobacco advertisements among a group of 12 to 14 year olds in the western United States. Data were collected from 32 middle school students using a head-mounted eye-tracking device that recorded viewing time, scan path patterns, fixation locations, and dwell time. Participants viewed a series of 20 magazine advertisements that included five U.S. tobacco ads with traditional Surgeon General warning messages and five U.S. tobacco ads that had been modified to include non-traditional messages and Canadian-style graphic images. Following eye tracking, participants completed unaided- and aided-recall exercises. Overall, the participants spent equal amounts of time viewing the advertisements regardless of the type of warning message. However, the warning messages that included the graphic images generated higher levels of visual attention directed specifically toward the message, based on average dwell time and fixation frequency, and were more likely to be accurately recalled than the traditional warning messages.
PubMed ID
21313984 View in PubMed
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