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Evaluation of the use of very high resolution aerial imagery for accurate ice-wedge polygon mapping (Adventdalen, Svalbard).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286037
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Sep 24;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-24-2017
Author
Maura Lousada
Pedro Pina
Gonçalo Vieira
Lourenço Bandeira
Carla Mora
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2017 Sep 24;
Date
Sep-24-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The main objective of this paper is to verify the accuracy of delineating and characterizing ice-wedge polygonal networks with features exclusively extracted from remotely sensed images of very high resolution. This kind of mapping plays a key role for quantifying ice-wedge degradation in warming permafrost. The evaluation of mapping a network is performed in this study with two sets of aerial images that are compared to ground reference data determined by fieldwork on the same network, located in Adventdalen, Svalbard (78°N). One aerial dataset is obtained from a photogrammetric survey with RGB+NIR imagery of 20cm/pixel, the other from an UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) survey that acquired RGB images of 6cm/pixel of spatial resolution. Besides evaluating the degree of matching between the delineations, the morphometric and topological features computed for the differently mapped versions of the network are also confronted, to have a more solid basis of comparison. The results obtained are similar enough to admit that remotely sensed images of very high resolution are an adequate support to provide extensive characterizations and classifications of this kind of patterned ground.
PubMed ID
28954702 View in PubMed
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Permafrost is warming at a global scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297556
Source
Nat Commun. 2019 01 16; 10(1):264
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-16-2019
Author
Boris K Biskaborn
Sharon L Smith
Jeannette Noetzli
Heidrun Matthes
Gonçalo Vieira
Dmitry A Streletskiy
Philippe Schoeneich
Vladimir E Romanovsky
Antoni G Lewkowicz
Andrey Abramov
Michel Allard
Julia Boike
William L Cable
Hanne H Christiansen
Reynald Delaloye
Bernhard Diekmann
Dmitry Drozdov
Bernd Etzelmüller
Guido Grosse
Mauro Guglielmin
Thomas Ingeman-Nielsen
Ketil Isaksen
Mamoru Ishikawa
Margareta Johansson
Halldor Johannsson
Anseok Joo
Dmitry Kaverin
Alexander Kholodov
Pavel Konstantinov
Tim Kröger
Christophe Lambiel
Jean-Pierre Lanckman
Dongliang Luo
Galina Malkova
Ian Meiklejohn
Natalia Moskalenko
Marc Oliva
Marcia Phillips
Miguel Ramos
A Britta K Sannel
Dmitrii Sergeev
Cathy Seybold
Pavel Skryabin
Alexander Vasiliev
Qingbai Wu
Kenji Yoshikawa
Mikhail Zheleznyak
Hugues Lantuit
Author Affiliation
Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, 14473, Germany. boris.biskaborn@awi.de.
Source
Nat Commun. 2019 01 16; 10(1):264
Date
01-16-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Permafrost warming has the potential to amplify global climate change, because when frozen sediments thaw it unlocks soil organic carbon. Yet to date, no globally consistent assessment of permafrost temperature change has been compiled. Here we use a global data set of permafrost temperature time series from the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost to evaluate temperature change across permafrost regions for the period since the International Polar Year (2007-2009). During the reference decade between 2007 and 2016, ground temperature near the depth of zero annual amplitude in the continuous permafrost zone increased by 0.39?±?0.15?°C. Over the same period, discontinuous permafrost warmed by 0.20?±?0.10?°C. Permafrost in mountains warmed by 0.19?±?0.05?°C and in Antarctica by 0.37?±?0.10?°C. Globally, permafrost temperature increased by 0.29?±?0.12?°C. The observed trend follows the Arctic amplification of air temperature increase in the Northern Hemisphere. In the discontinuous zone, however, ground warming occurred due to increased snow thickness while air temperature remained statistically unchanged.
PubMed ID
30651568 View in PubMed
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