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Adolescents' lifetime experience of selling sex: development over five years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114699
Source
J Child Sex Abus. 2013;22(3):312-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Cecilia Fredlund
Frida Svensson
Carl Göran Svedin
Gisela Priebe
Marie Wadsby
Author Affiliation
Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
J Child Sex Abus. 2013;22(3):312-25
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Prostitution - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Support
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - ethnology
Time Factors
Abstract
Lifetime experience of selling sex among adolescents was investigated together with sociodemographic correlates, parent-child relationship, and the existence of people to confide in. Changes over time regarding the selling of sex were investigated through a comparison of data from 2004 and 2009. This study was carried out using 3,498 adolescents from a representative sample of Swedish high school students with a mean age 18.3 years. Of these adolescents, 1.5% stated that they had given sexual services for reimbursement and both male and female buyers existed. The adolescents who had sold sex had a poorer parent-child relationship during childhood and had fewer people to confide in about problems and worries. Changes over time were found especially regarding the Internet as a contact source and also immigrant background.
PubMed ID
23590352 View in PubMed
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Adolescents selling sex: exposure to abuse, mental health, self-harm behaviour and the need for help and support--a study of a Swedish national sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124629
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2013 Apr;67(2):81-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Frida Svensson
Cecilia Fredlund
Carl Göran Svedin
Gisela Priebe
Marie Wadsby
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of health Sciences, Linköping University, SE-582 25 Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2013 Apr;67(2):81-8
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mental disorders
Mental health
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Sex Offenses - statistics & numerical data
Sex Workers - psychology
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Selling sex is not uncommon among adolescents and we need to increase our knowledge of how this affects them.
The aim of this study was to investigate adolescents who sell sex regarding sexual, mental and physical abuse, mental health as estimated by using the Hopkins Symptom Check List-25 (HSCL-25), self-harm behaviour and the adolescents' experience of receiving help and support.
The study was carried out on a national representative sample of adolescents (mean age 18.3 years) in Swedish high schools in the final year of their 3-year programme. The study had 3498 participants and a response rate of 60.4%.
Of the adolescents, 1.5% stated that they had sold sexual services. The selling of sex was associated with a history of sexual, mental and physical abuse. Poorer mental health and a higher degree of self-harm behaviour were reported among the adolescents who had sold sex. Help and support was sought to a greater extent by adolescents who had sold sex but these adolescents were not as satisfied with this help and support as the other adolescents.
Adolescents that sell sex are a group especially exposed to sexual, mental and physical abuse. They have poorer mental health and engage in more self-harm behaviour than other adolescents. They are in need of more help and support than other adolescents and it is reasonable to assert that more resources, research and attention should be directed to this group to provide better help and support in the future.
PubMed ID
22563767 View in PubMed
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Background, experience of abuse, and mental health among adolescents in out-of-home care: a cross-sectional study of a Swedish high school national sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300047
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2019 Jan; 73(1):16-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Rikard Tordön
Carl Göran Svedin
Cecilia Fredlund
Linda Jonsson
Gisela Priebe
Gunilla Sydsjö
Author Affiliation
a Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine , Linköping University , Linköping , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2019 Jan; 73(1):16-23
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child, Foster - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Foster Home Care - psychology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental health
Self Concept
Self Report
Sexual Behavior
Socioeconomic Factors
Students
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To compare experiences for adverse events, especially sexual abuse, and mental health in a group of high school students in out-of-home care with a representative sample of peers of the same age and similar educational attainment living with their parents.
A sample of 5839 students in the third year of Swedish high school, corresponding to a response rate of 59.7%, answered a study specific questionnaire. Data from 41 students living in out-of-home care were compared with data from peers not in out-of-home care in a cross-sectional analyze.
Students in out-of-home care had more often an immigrant background and a non-heterosexual orientation, had more often experienced physical and penetrative sexual abuse, and more often sought healthcare for mental problems. Disclosure of sexual abuse was less common, and acts of persuasion or adults' use of their social position was more common among students in out-of-home care.
Even where the protective factor 'senior educational attainment' is present, risks for abuse and poor mental health are evident for adolescents in out-of-home care. Disclosure of adversity, when it has occurred, ought to be higher among these adolescents with regular contact with social services, but our findings indicate tendencies for the opposite. We therefore suggest routines to be established to screen for adverse life events and mental health actively, along with general and systematic assessments of adversity and mental health during care.
PubMed ID
30561234 View in PubMed
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Frequent users of pornography. A population based epidemiological study of Swedish male adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140336
Source
J Adolesc. 2011 Aug;34(4):779-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Carl Göran Svedin
Ingrid Akerman
Gisela Priebe
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, IKE, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, S-581 85 Linköping, Sweden. Carl.Goran.Svedin@liu.se
Source
J Adolesc. 2011 Aug;34(4):779-88
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Epidemiologic Studies
Erotica - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Frequent use of pornography has not been sufficiently studied before. In a Swedish survey 2015 male students aged 18 years participated. A group of frequent users of pornography (N = 200, 10.5%) were studied with respect to background and psychosocial correlates. The frequent users had a more positive attitude to pornography, were more often "turned on" viewing pornography and viewed more often advanced forms of pornography. Frequent use was also associated with many problem behaviours. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that frequent users of pornography were more likely to be living in a large city, consuming alcohol more often, having greater sexual desire and had more often sold sex than other boys of the same age. High frequent viewing of pornography may be seen as a problematic behaviour that needs more attention from both parents and teachers and also to be addressed in clinical interviews.
PubMed ID
20888038 View in PubMed
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Online or off-line victimisation and psychological well-being: a comparison of sexual-minority and heterosexual youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122805
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2012 Oct;21(10):569-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Gisela Priebe
Carl Göran Svedin
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, IKVL, Lund University, Box 117, 221 00 Lund, Sweden. gisela.priebe@med.lu.se
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2012 Oct;21(10):569-82
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Crime Victims
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Internet
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental disorders
Mental health
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Sex Offenses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sexuality
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare sexual-minority and heterosexual youths' exposure to sexual abuse off-line, problematic sexual meetings off-line with person/s met online and online harassment with regard to prevalence, psychological well-being and support seeking. A nationally representative sample of 3,432 Swedish high school seniors completed an anonymous school-based survey about sexuality, health, sexual abuse and online-related sexual victimisation or harassment. Sexual-minority adolescents reported a greater rate of sexual abuse, problematic sexual meetings off-line with person/s met online and online harassment, compared to heterosexual youth. When compared to non-victimised heterosexual adolescents, victimised heterosexual adolescents and non-victimised and victimised sexual-minority adolescents reported more psychiatric symptoms, lower self-esteem and a weaker sense of coherence. Same-sex sexual orientation was related to more psychiatric symptoms, lower self-esteem and a weaker sense of coherence even when controlled for victimisation and gender. Compared to victimised heterosexual adolescents, victimised sexual-minority adolescents were more likely to seek support because of sexual abuse (females) or Internet-related problems (males and females). Results for sexual-minority youth were basically the same whether sexual orientation was assessed as sexual identity or as sexual or emotional attraction. Health care providers are challenged to not only provide the same care to sexual-minority youth who seek counselling or psychiatric treatment for mental health problems or problems related to victimisation that all adolescents should receive but also to find ways to address topics like prevention of sexual abuse and risk-taking behaviour online or off-line.
PubMed ID
22772657 View in PubMed
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Online sexual behaviours among Swedish youth: associations to background factors, behaviours and abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272616
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2015 Oct;24(10):1245-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Linda S Jonsson
Marie Bladh
Gisela Priebe
Carl Göran Svedin
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2015 Oct;24(10):1245-60
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Internet - utilization
Logistic Models
Male
Prostitution - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk-Taking
Sex Offenses - psychology
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Sexual activity online may result in positive experiences for young people, or lead them to engage in risky behaviours possibly resulting in sexual assault or abuse. The aim of our study was to investigate associations between online sexual behaviours among Swedish youth and background factors as well as aspects of well-being. The behaviours investigated were: having sex online with a contact met online, having sex with an online contact offline, posting sexual pictures online, and selling sex online. We used data from a representative sample of 3,432 Swedish youth who were asked about their lifetime experiences as well as their experiences within the previous year. We hypothesized that more advanced online sexual behaviours were associated with more problematic background factors, worse psychosocial well-being and riskier behaviours in general. Bivariate relationships were evaluated followed by a multiple logistic regression model. Our data suggested that most Swedish youth do not perform any of the assessed online sexual behaviours. Young people who reported online sexual behaviour showed a more problematic background, rated their health as poorer, had a more sexualized life and had experienced more sexual or physical abuse. Professionals who work with young people need to help them better evaluate potential risks online and offer support when needed. Youths who sell sex online are especially at risk and need extra attention, as they might be in greater need of protection and therapeutic support.
PubMed ID
25589438 View in PubMed
Less detail

Polytraumatization in an adult national sample and its association with psychological distress and self-esteem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268308
Source
Brain Behav. 2015 Jan;5(1):62-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Doris Nilsson
Örjan Dahlstöm
Gisela Priebe
Carl Göran Svedin
Source
Brain Behav. 2015 Jan;5(1):62-74
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Trauma - complications - psychology
Self Concept
Self Report
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of self-reported experiences of potential childhood traumas and polytraumatization, and to find cut-off values for different kinds of potential traumatic events in a national representative sample of adults in Sweden. In addition, to analyse the association between polytraumatization and both psychological distress and global self-esteem.
A web-based survey - containing SCL-25 and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Linköping Difficult Life Events Scale - Adult - was sent out to a nationally reprative sample and 5062 people chose to participate in the study.
Results showed that almost everyone (97%) has experienced at least one potential traumatic event and that polytraumatization (the 10% of the participants with most reported traumas) was significantly (Z = 12.57, P 
Notes
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Erratum In: Brain Behav. 2015 May;5(5):e0034426015874
PubMed ID
25722950 View in PubMed
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Sexual abuse and associations with psychosocial aspects of health. A population-based study with Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98783
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010;64(1):40-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Gisela Priebe
Kjell Hansson
Carl Göran Svedin
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, IKVL, Lund University, Sweden. Gisela.Priebe@med.lu.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010;64(1):40-8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Demography
Female
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Offenses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few population-based Nordic studies with adolescents investigate the associations between sexual abuse (SA) and psychosocial health. AIM: Associations between adolescents' self-reported experiences of SA different severity and aspects of psychosocial health such as emotional and behavioral problems, sense of coherence and self-esteem were investigated. METHODS: A school-based study with 1107 Swedish high school seniors was conducted. The students completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC), I think I am and a self-report survey that included questions about SA, socio-demographic variables and family variables. RESULTS: SA was related to more emotional and behavioral problems, weaker SOC and lower self-esteem when compared with non-abuse. There was also a dose-response effect insofar as more severe abuse was related to poorer psychosocial health. When adjusted for socio-demographic and family-related variables, the associations between penetrating SA and most of the health variables weakened or disappeared. SOC was associated with penetrating SA even after adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: This population-based study suggests that SA should not be regarded as an isolated factor in relation to psychosocial health as the associations at a group level may be smaller than expected. Among a number of covariates, family variables such as parental bonding showed to be especially important. Sense of Coherence may be of special interest in further research and clinical treatment.
PubMed ID
19883194 View in PubMed
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Sexual coercion experience and sexually coercive behavior: a population study of Swedish and Norwegian male youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100606
Source
Child Maltreat. 2010 Aug;15(3):219-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Michael C Seto
Cecilia Kjellgren
Gisela Priebe
Svein Mossige
Carl Göran Svedin
Niklas Långström
Author Affiliation
Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, Brockville, Canada. michael.seto@rohcg.on.ca
Source
Child Maltreat. 2010 Aug;15(3):219-28
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Rape - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The authors tested the hypothesis that experiencing sexual coercion and engaging in sexually coercive behavior are positively associated in a representative sample totaling almost 4,000 Swedish or Norwegian male high school students (estimated response rate 80%). In both surveys, youths who had experienced sexual coercion were approximately three times more likely to engage in sexually coercive behavior than those without such experience (10%-12% vs. 4%). The association between sexual coercion experience and sexually coercive behavior was attenuated but remained significant and moderately strong in both surveys when controlling for nonsexual antisocial behavior, substance use, and noncoercive sexual behavior in multivariate logistic regression models. The population attributable fraction (proportion of sexually coercive behavior that can be explained by sexual coercion experience) was 18%-25%. The findings support a robust link between having been sexually coerced and engaging in coercive sexual behavior in the general population.
PubMed ID
20460305 View in PubMed
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Viewing child pornography: prevalence and correlates in a representative community sample of young Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262436
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2015 Jan;44(1):67-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Michael C Seto
Chantal A Hermann
Cecilia Kjellgren
Gisela Priebe
Carl Göran Svedin
Niklas Långström
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2015 Jan;44(1):67-79
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Erotica - psychology
Humans
Male
Pedophilia - epidemiology - psychology
Prevalence
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Most research on child pornography use has been based on selected clinical or criminal justice samples; risk factors for child pornography use in the general population remain largely unexplored. In this study, we examined prevalence, risk factors, and correlates of viewing depictions of adult-child sex in a population-representative sample of 1,978 young Swedish men (17-20 years, Mdn = 18 years, overall response rate, 77 %). In an anonymous, school-based survey, participants self-reported sexual coercion experiences, attitudes and beliefs about sex, perceived peer attitudes, and sexual interests and behaviors; including pornography use, sexual interest in children, and sexually coercive behavior. A total of 84 (4.2 %) young men reported they had ever viewed child pornography. Most theory-based variables were moderately and significantly associated with child pornography viewing and were consistent with models of sexual offending implicating both antisociality and sexual deviance. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, 7 of 15 tested factors independently predicted child pornography viewing and explained 42 % of the variance: ever had sex with a male, likely to have sex with a child aged 12-14, likely to have sex with a child 12 or less, perception of children as seductive, having friends who have watched child pornography, frequent pornography use, and ever viewed violent pornography. From these, a 6-item Child Pornography Correlates Scale was constructed and then cross-validated in a similar but independent Norwegian sample.
PubMed ID
24515803 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.