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Arctic avian predators synchronise their spring migration with the northern progression of snowmelt.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306076
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 04 29; 10(1):7220
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-29-2020
Author
Teja Curk
Ivan Pokrovsky
Nicolas Lecomte
Tomas Aarvak
David F Brinker
Kurt Burnham
Andreas Dietz
Andrew Dixon
Alastair Franke
Gilles Gauthier
Karl-Otto Jacobsen
Jeff Kidd
Stephen B Lewis
Ingar J Øien
Aleksandr Sokolov
Vasiliy Sokolov
Roar Solheim
Scott Weidensaul
Karen Wiebe
Martin Wikelski
Jean-François Therrien
Kamran Safi
Author Affiliation
Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, Department of Migration, Am Obstberg 1, Radolfzell, 78315, Germany. tcurk@ab.mpg.de.
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 04 29; 10(1):7220
Date
04-29-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
Arctic Regions
Falconiformes - physiology
Models, Biological
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Abstract
Migratory species display a range of migration patterns between irruptive (facultative) to regular (obligate), as a response to different predictability of resources. In the Arctic, snow directly influences resource availability. The causes and consequences of different migration patterns of migratory species as a response to the snow conditions remains however unexplored. Birds migrating to the Arctic are expected to follow the spring snowmelt to optimise their arrival time and select for snow-free areas to maximise prey encounter en-route. Based on large-scale movement data, we compared the migration patterns of three top predator species of the tundra in relation to the spatio-temporal dynamics of snow cover. The snowy owl, an irruptive migrant, the rough-legged buzzard, with an intermediary migration pattern, and the peregrine falcon as a regular migrant, all followed, as expected, the spring snowmelt during their migrations. However, the owl stayed ahead, the buzzard stayed on, and the falcon stayed behind the spatio-temporal peak in snowmelt. Although none of the species avoided snow-covered areas, they presumably used snow presence as a cue to time their arrival at their breeding grounds. We show the importance of environmental cues for species with different migration patterns.
Notes
ErratumIn: Sci Rep. 2020 Sep 17;10(1):15450 PMID 32943746
PubMed ID
32350286 View in PubMed
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Assessing Stress in Arctic Lemmings: Fecal Metabolite Levels Reflect Plasma Free Corticosterone Levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281427
Source
Physiol Biochem Zool. 2017 May/Jun;90(3):370-382
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dominique Fauteux
Gilles Gauthier
Dominique Berteaux
Curtis Bosson
Rupert Palme
Rudy Boonstra
Source
Physiol Biochem Zool. 2017 May/Jun;90(3):370-382
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Interest in the ecology of stress in wild populations has triggered the development of noninvasive methods for quantifying stress hormones. Measurement of fecal corticosteroid metabolites (FCMs) is one such method, but it is still unclear whether FCMs can be a reliable proxy of free plasma glucocorticoids. To assess the validity of this assumption, we carried out a robust assessment on brown lemmings (Lemmus trimucronatus) from Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada, that were hand captured and anesthetized and related plasma glucocorticoid levels to fecal metabolite glucocorticoid levels. We examined endogenous factors that could explain interindividual variability. Blood corticosterone was measured from samples obtained on capture and 30 min later, and FCM levels were measured from animals kept in captivity for 72 h. Plasma free corticosterone increased 135-fold over baseline values 30 min after capture, which confirmed that initial handling was perceived as a stressor. We found that FCM levels were highly related with free (marginal [Formula: see text] = 0.53) but not with total ([Formula: see text] = 0.02) corticosterone levels, regardless of age, sex, and reproductive condition. FCM levels started increasing 2 h after capture and reached maximum levels 4 h after capture. No circadian rhythm in FCMs was found. Plasma total corticosterone levels were much higher in adult females compared with adult males, but this difference was much smaller when measuring free corticosterone levels and FCM levels. Our results suggest that FCM levels are good measures of stress by being closely related to plasma free corticosterone levels in brown lemmings.
PubMed ID
28384423 View in PubMed
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Author Correction: Arctic avian predators synchronise their spring migration with the northern progression of snowmelt.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304714
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 09 17; 10(1):15450
Publication Type
Journal Article
Published Erratum
Date
09-17-2020
Author
Teja Curk
Ivan Pokrovsky
Nicolas Lecomte
Tomas Aarvak
David F Brinker
Kurt Burnham
Andreas Dietz
Andrew Dixon
Alastair Franke
Gilles Gauthier
Karl-Otto Jacobsen
Jeff Kidd
Stephen B Lewis
Ingar J Øien
Aleksandr Sokolov
Vasiliy Sokolov
Roar Solheim
Scott Weidensaul
Karen Wiebe
Martin Wikelski
Jean-François Therrien
Kamran Safi
Author Affiliation
Department of Migration, Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, Am Obstberg 1, 78315, Radolfzell, Germany. tcurk@ab.mpg.de.
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 09 17; 10(1):15450
Date
09-17-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Published Erratum
Abstract
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Notes
ErratumFor: Sci Rep. 2020 Apr 29;10(1):7220 PMID 32350286
PubMed ID
32943746 View in PubMed
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Correction to: Documenting lemming population change in the Arctic: Can we detect trends?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308669
Source
Ambio. 2020 03; 49(3):801-804
Publication Type
Journal Article
Published Erratum
Date
03-2020

Direct and indirect effects of regional and local climatic factors on trophic interactions in the Arctic tundra.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308934
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2020 03; 89(3):704-715
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2020
Author
Claire-Cécile Juhasz
Bill Shipley
Gilles Gauthier
Dominique Berteaux
Nicolas Lecomte
Author Affiliation
Canada Research Chair in Polar and Boreal Ecology, Université de Moncton, Moncton, NB, Canada.
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2020 03; 89(3):704-715
Date
03-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Arvicolinae
Ecosystem
Food chain
Population Dynamics
Tundra
Abstract
Climate change can impact ecosystems by reshaping the dynamics of resource exploitation for predators and their prey. Alterations of these pathways could be especially intense in ecosystems characterized by a simple trophic structure and rapid warming trends, such as in the Arctic. However, quantifying the multiple direct and indirect pathways through which climate change is likely to alter trophic interactions and their relative strength remains a challenge. Here, we aim to identify direct and indirect causal mechanisms driven by climate affecting predator-prey interactions of species sharing a tundra food web. We based our study on relationships between one Arctic predator (Arctic fox) and its two main prey - lemmings (preferred prey) and snow geese (alternate prey) - which are exposed to variable local and regional climatic factors across years. We used a combination of models mapping multiple causal links among key variables derived from a long-term dataset (21 years). We obtained several possible scenarios linking regional climate factors (Arctic oscillations) and local temperature and precipitation to the breeding of species. Our results suggest that both regional and local climate factors have direct and indirect impacts on the breeding of foxes and geese. Local climate showed a positive causal link with goose nesting success, while both regional and local climate displayed contrasted effects on the proportion of fox breeding. We found no impact of climate on lemming abundance. We observed positive relationships between lemming, fox and goose reproduction highlighting numerical and functional responses of fox to the variability of lemming abundance. Our study measures causal links and strength of interactions in a food web, quantifying both numerical response of a predator and apparent interactions between its two main prey. These results improve our understanding of the complex effects of climate on predator-prey interactions and our capacity to anticipate food web response to ongoing climate change.
Les changements climatiques peuvent avoir un impact sur les écosystèmes au travers des modifications de la dynamique d'exploitation des ressources par les prédateurs et leurs proies. Dans le cas de l'Arctique, caractérisée par un réseau trophique simple et une sensibilité marquée au réchauffement climatique, l'altération de ces relations trophiques pourrait être particulièrement importante. Cependant, la quantification des nombreux liens directs et indirects à travers lesquels les changements climatiques peuvent affecter les interactions trophiques demeure un défi. Notre objectif est d'identifier les mécanismes causaux directs et indirects, sous-tendus par le climat, affectant les interactions prédateur-proie au sein d'un réseau trophique au cœur de la toundra. Notre étude se base sur les relations entre un prédateur (renard arctique) et ses deux proies principales -le lemming (proie préférée) et la grande oie des neiges (proie alternative)- et qui subissent un accroissement des précipitations et des températures au travers des années. Nous avons utilisé une combinaison de modèles illustrant les liens causaux multiples entre les variables clés issues d'une base de données à long-terme (21 ans). Nous avons obtenu plusieurs scénarios possibles reliant les facteurs climatiques régionaux (Oscillation Arctique) et les températures et précipitations locales à la reproduction de nos 3 espèces. Nos résultats suggèrent que les facteurs climatiques régionaux et locaux présentent des impacts directs et indirects sur la reproduction du renard arctique et de l'oie des neiges. Le climat local présente un lien causal positif avec le succès de nidification de l'oie, alors que le climat local et régional démontrent un effet contrasté sur la proportion de renard en reproduction. Aucune relation entre les facteurs climatiques et l'abondance des lemmings n'a été trouvée. Nous avons observé des liens causaux positifs entre la reproduction du lemming, du renard et de l'oie, mettant en évidence les réponses numériques et fonctionnelles du renard arctique face à la variabilité de l'abondance de lemming. Notre étude est une des premières à mesurer les liens causaux et les forces d'interaction entre les espèces partageant un même réseau trophique, quantifiant ainsi la réponse numérique du prédateur et les interactions apparentes entre ses proies principales. Ces résultats améliorent notre compréhension des effets complexes du climat sur les interactions prédateur-proie et notre capacité à anticiper la réponse des réseaux trophiques aux changements climatiques en cours.
PubMed ID
31538330 View in PubMed
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Documenting lemming population change in the Arctic: Can we detect trends?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309341
Source
Ambio. 2020 Mar; 49(3):786-800
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2020
Author
Dorothée Ehrich
Niels M Schmidt
Gilles Gauthier
Ray Alisauskas
Anders Angerbjörn
Karin Clark
Frauke Ecke
Nina E Eide
Erik Framstad
Jay Frandsen
Alastair Franke
Olivier Gilg
Marie-Andrée Giroux
Heikki Henttonen
Birger Hörnfeldt
Rolf A Ims
Gennadiy D Kataev
Sergey P Kharitonov
Siw T Killengreen
Charles J Krebs
Richard B Lanctot
Nicolas Lecomte
Irina E Menyushina
Douglas W Morris
Guy Morrisson
Lauri Oksanen
Tarja Oksanen
Johan Olofsson
Ivan G Pokrovsky
Igor Yu Popov
Donald Reid
James D Roth
Sarah T Saalfeld
Gustaf Samelius
Benoit Sittler
Sergey M Sleptsov
Paul A Smith
Aleksandr A Sokolov
Natalya A Sokolova
Mikhail Y Soloviev
Diana V Solovyeva
Author Affiliation
UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Framstredet 39, 9037, Tromsø, Norway. dorothee.ehrich@uit.no.
Source
Ambio. 2020 Mar; 49(3):786-800
Date
Mar-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Arvicolinae
Canada
Ecosystem
Population Dynamics
Russia
Abstract
Lemmings are a key component of tundra food webs and changes in their dynamics can affect the whole ecosystem. We present a comprehensive overview of lemming monitoring and research activities, and assess recent trends in lemming abundance across the circumpolar Arctic. Since 2000, lemmings have been monitored at 49 sites of which 38 are still active. The sites were not evenly distributed with notably Russia and high Arctic Canada underrepresented. Abundance was monitored at all sites, but methods and levels of precision varied greatly. Other important attributes such as health, genetic diversity and potential drivers of population change, were often not monitored. There was no evidence that lemming populations were decreasing in general, although a negative trend was detected for low arctic populations sympatric with voles. To keep the pace of arctic change, we recommend maintaining long-term programmes while harmonizing methods, improving spatial coverage and integrating an ecosystem perspective.
Notes
ErratumIn: Ambio. 2019 Oct 11;: PMID 31605369
PubMed ID
31332767 View in PubMed
Less detail

Documenting lemming population change in the Arctic: Can we detect trends?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301997
Source
Ambio. 2019 Jul 22; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-22-2019
Author
Dorothée Ehrich
Niels M Schmidt
Gilles Gauthier
Ray Alisauskas
Anders Angerbjörn
Karin Clark
Frauke Ecke
Nina E Eide
Erik Framstad
Jay Frandsen
Alastair Franke
Olivier Gilg
Marie-Andrée Giroux
Heikki Henttonen
Birger Hörnfeldt
Rolf A Ims
Gennadiy D Kataev
Sergey P Kharitonov
Siw T Killengreen
Charles J Krebs
Richard B Lanctot
Nicolas Lecomte
Irina E Menyushina
Douglas W Morris
Guy Morrisson
Lauri Oksanen
Tarja Oksanen
Johan Olofsson
Ivan G Pokrovsky
Igor Yu Popov
Donald Reid
James D Roth
Sarah T Saalfeld
Gustaf Samelius
Benoit Sittler
Sergey M Sleptsov
Paul A Smith
Aleksandr A Sokolov
Natalya A Sokolova
Mikhail Y Soloviev
Diana V Solovyeva
Author Affiliation
UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Framstredet 39, 9037, Tromsø, Norway. dorothee.ehrich@uit.no.
Source
Ambio. 2019 Jul 22; :
Date
Jul-22-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Lemmings are a key component of tundra food webs and changes in their dynamics can affect the whole ecosystem. We present a comprehensive overview of lemming monitoring and research activities, and assess recent trends in lemming abundance across the circumpolar Arctic. Since 2000, lemmings have been monitored at 49 sites of which 38 are still active. The sites were not evenly distributed with notably Russia and high Arctic Canada underrepresented. Abundance was monitored at all sites, but methods and levels of precision varied greatly. Other important attributes such as health, genetic diversity and potential drivers of population change, were often not monitored. There was no evidence that lemming populations were decreasing in general, although a negative trend was detected for low arctic populations sympatric with voles. To keep the pace of arctic change, we recommend maintaining long-term programmes while harmonizing methods, improving spatial coverage and integrating an ecosystem perspective.
Notes
ErratumIn: Ambio. 2019 Oct 11;: PMID 31605369
PubMed ID
31332767 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ecological insights from three decades of animal movement tracking across a changing Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304243
Source
Science. 2020 11 06; 370(6517):712-715
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
11-06-2020
Author
Sarah C Davidson
Gil Bohrer
Eliezer Gurarie
Scott LaPoint
Peter J Mahoney
Natalie T Boelman
Jan U H Eitel
Laura R Prugh
Lee A Vierling
Jyoti Jennewein
Emma Grier
Ophélie Couriot
Allicia P Kelly
Arjan J H Meddens
Ruth Y Oliver
Roland Kays
Martin Wikelski
Tomas Aarvak
Joshua T Ackerman
José A Alves
Erin Bayne
Bryan Bedrosian
Jerrold L Belant
Andrew M Berdahl
Alicia M Berlin
Dominique Berteaux
Joël Bêty
Dmitrijs Boiko
Travis L Booms
Bridget L Borg
Stan Boutin
W Sean Boyd
Kane Brides
Stephen Brown
Victor N Bulyuk
Kurt K Burnham
David Cabot
Michael Casazza
Katherine Christie
Erica H Craig
Shanti E Davis
Tracy Davison
Dominic Demma
Christopher R DeSorbo
Andrew Dixon
Robert Domenech
Götz Eichhorn
Kyle Elliott
Joseph R Evenson
Klaus-Michael Exo
Steven H Ferguson
Wolfgang Fiedler
Aaron Fisk
Jérôme Fort
Alastair Franke
Mark R Fuller
Stefan Garthe
Gilles Gauthier
Grant Gilchrist
Petr Glazov
Carrie E Gray
David Grémillet
Larry Griffin
Michael T Hallworth
Autumn-Lynn Harrison
Holly L Hennin
J Mark Hipfner
James Hodson
James A Johnson
Kyle Joly
Kimberly Jones
Todd E Katzner
Jeff W Kidd
Elly C Knight
Michael N Kochert
Andrea Kölzsch
Helmut Kruckenberg
Benjamin J Lagassé
Sandra Lai
Jean-François Lamarre
Richard B Lanctot
Nicholas C Larter
A David M Latham
Christopher J Latty
James P Lawler
Don-Jean Léandri-Breton
Hansoo Lee
Stephen B Lewis
Oliver P Love
Jesper Madsen
Mark Maftei
Mark L Mallory
Buck Mangipane
Mikhail Y Markovets
Peter P Marra
Rebecca McGuire
Carol L McIntyre
Emily A McKinnon
Tricia A Miller
Sander Moonen
Tong Mu
Gerhard J D M Müskens
Janet Ng
Kerry L Nicholson
Ingar Jostein Øien
Cory Overton
Patricia A Owen
Allison Patterson
Aevar Petersen
Ivan Pokrovsky
Luke L Powell
Rui Prieto
Petra Quillfeldt
Jennie Rausch
Kelsey Russell
Sarah T Saalfeld
Hans Schekkerman
Joel A Schmutz
Philipp Schwemmer
Dale R Seip
Adam Shreading
Mónica A Silva
Brian W Smith
Fletcher Smith
Jeff P Smith
Katherine R S Snell
Aleksandr Sokolov
Vasiliy Sokolov
Diana V Solovyeva
Mathew S Sorum
Grigori Tertitski
J F Therrien
Kasper Thorup
T Lee Tibbitts
Ingrid Tulp
Brian D Uher-Koch
Rob S A van Bemmelen
Steven Van Wilgenburg
Andrew L Von Duyke
Jesse L Watson
Bryan D Watts
Judy A Williams
Matthew T Wilson
James R Wright
Michael A Yates
David J Yurkowski
Ramunas Žydelis
Mark Hebblewhite
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
Source
Science. 2020 11 06; 370(6517):712-715
Date
11-06-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Acclimatization
Animal Migration
Animals
Archives
Arctic Regions
Ecological Parameter Monitoring
Population
Abstract
The Arctic is entering a new ecological state, with alarming consequences for humanity. Animal-borne sensors offer a window into these changes. Although substantial animal tracking data from the Arctic and subarctic exist, most are difficult to discover and access. Here, we present the new Arctic Animal Movement Archive (AAMA), a growing collection of more than 200 standardized terrestrial and marine animal tracking studies from 1991 to the present. The AAMA supports public data discovery, preserves fundamental baseline data for the future, and facilitates efficient, collaborative data analysis. With AAMA-based case studies, we document climatic influences on the migration phenology of eagles, geographic differences in the adaptive response of caribou reproductive phenology to climate change, and species-specific changes in terrestrial mammal movement rates in response to increasing temperature.
PubMed ID
33154141 View in PubMed
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The greater snow goose Anser caerulescens atlanticus: Managing an overabundant population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280336
Source
Ambio. 2017 Mar;46(Suppl 2):262-274
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Josée Lefebvre
Gilles Gauthier
Jean-François Giroux
Austin Reed
Eric T Reed
Luc Bélanger
Source
Ambio. 2017 Mar;46(Suppl 2):262-274
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Between the early 1900s and the 1990s, the greater snow goose Anser caerulescens atlanticus population grew from 3000 individuals to more than 700 000. Because of concerns about Arctic degradation of natural habitats through overgrazing, a working group recommended the stabilization of the population. Declared overabundant in 1998, special management actions were then implemented in Canada and the United States. Meanwhile, a cost-benefit socioeconomic analysis was performed to set a target population size. Discussions aiming towards attaining a common vision were undertaken with stakeholders at multiple levels. The implemented measures have had varying success; but population size has been generally stable since 1999. To be effective and meet social acceptance, management actions must have a scientific basis, result from a consensus among stakeholders, and include an efficient monitoring programme. In this paper, historical changes in population size and management decisions along with past and current challenges encountered are discussed.
PubMed ID
28215008 View in PubMed
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High Arctic lemmings remain reproductively active under predator-induced elevated stress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291103
Source
Oecologia. 2018 Jul; 187(3):657-666
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Dominique Fauteux
Gilles Gauthier
Dominique Berteaux
Rupert Palme
Rudy Boonstra
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Centre d'études nordiques, Université Laval, 1045 Avenue de la Médecine, Quebec, QC, G1V 0A6, Canada. dfauteux@nature.ca.
Source
Oecologia. 2018 Jul; 187(3):657-666
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Non-consumptive effects of predation have rarely been assessed in wildlife populations even though their impact could be as important as lethal effects. Reproduction of individuals is one of the most important demographic parameters that could be affected by predator-induced stress, which in turn can have important consequences on population dynamics. We studied non-consumptive effects of predation on the reproductive activity (i.e., mating and fertilization) of a cyclic population of brown lemmings exposed to intense summer predation in the Canadian High Arctic. Lemmings were live-trapped, their reproductive activity (i.e., testes visible in males, pregnancy/lactation in females) assessed, and predators were monitored during the summers of 2014 and 2015 within a 9 ha predator-reduction exclosure delimited by a fence and covered by a net, and on an 11 ha control area. Stress levels were quantified non-invasively with fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM). We found that FCM levels of lemmings captured outside the predator exclosure (n?=?50) were 1.6 times higher than inside (n?=?51). The proportion of pregnant/lactating adult females did not differ between the two areas, nor did the proportion of adult scrotal males. We found that lemmings showed physiological stress reactions due to high predation risk, but had no sign of reduced mating activity or fertility. Thus, our results do not support the hypothesis of reproductive suppression by predator-induced stress.
PubMed ID
29651661 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.