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Acute stress disorder after myocardial infarction: prevalence and associated factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154428
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Nov;70(9):1028-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Marie-Anne Roberge
Gilles Dupuis
André Marchand
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Nov;70(9):1028-34
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Myocardial Infarction - complications
Personality Inventory
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To examine the prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) after a myocardial infarction (MI) and the factors associated with its development.
Of 1344 MI patients admitted to three Canadian hospitals, 474 patients did not meet the inclusion criteria and 393 declined participation in the study; 477 patients consented to participate in the study. A structured interview and questionnaires were administered to patients 48 hours to 14 days post MI (mean +/- standard deviation = 4 +/- 2.73 days).
Four percent were classified as having ASD using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, ASD module. The presence of symptoms of depression (Beck Depression Inventory; odds ratio (OR) = 29.92) and the presence of perceived distress during the MI (measured using the question "How difficult/upsetting was the experience of your MI?"; OR = 3.42, R(2) = .35) were associated with the presence of symptoms of ASD on the Modified PTSD Symptom Scale. The intensity of the symptoms of depression was associated with the intensity of ASD symptoms (R = .65). The models for the detection and estimation of ASD symptoms were validated by applying the regression equations to 72 participants not included in the initial regressions. The results obtained in the validation sample did not differ from those obtained in the initial sample.
The symptoms of depression and the subjective distress during the MI could be used to improve the detection of ASD.
PubMed ID
18981272 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparing two brief psychological interventions to usual care in panic disorder patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131181
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2012 Mar;40(2):129-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Marie-Josée Lessard
André Marchand
Marie-Ève Pelland
Geneviève Belleville
Alain Vadeboncoeur
Jean-Marc Chauny
Julien Poitras
Gilles Dupuis
Richard Fleet
Guillaume Foldes-Busque
Kim L Lavoie
Author Affiliation
University of Quebec at Montreal, Canada.
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2012 Mar;40(2):129-47
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Agoraphobia - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Chest Pain - psychology
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Cohort Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, University
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Neurocirculatory Asthenia - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Panic Disorder - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Psychotherapy, Brief - methods
Quebec
Young Adult
Abstract
Panic disorder (PD) is a common, often unrecognized condition among patients presenting with chest pain to the emergency departments (ED). Nevertheless, psychological treatment is rarely initiated. We are unaware of studies that evaluated the efficacy of brief cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for this population.
Evaluate the efficacy of two brief CBT interventions in PD patients presenting to the ED with chest pain.
Fifty-eight PD patients were assigned to either a 1-session CBT-based panic management intervention (PMI) (n = 24), a 7-session CBT intervention (n = 19), or a usual-care control condition (n = 15). A structured diagnostic interview and self-reported questionnaires were administered at pre-test, post-test, 3- and 6-month follow-ups.
Statistical analysis showed significant reduction in PD severity following both interventions compared to usual care control condition, but with neither showing superiority compared to the other.
CBT-based interventions as brief as a single session initiated within 2 weeks after an ED visit for chest pain appear to be effective for PD. Given the high prevalence of PD in emergency care settings, greater efforts should be made to implement these interventions in the ED and/or primary care setting.
PubMed ID
21929830 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of a home-based exercise intervention on fatigue in postpartum depressed women: results of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158025
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2008 Apr;35(2):179-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Maria Dritsa
Deborah Da Costa
Gilles Dupuis
Ilka Lowensteyn
Samir Khalifé
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Canada. mdritsa@epimgh.mcgill.ca
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2008 Apr;35(2):179-87
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Depression, Postpartum - psychology - rehabilitation
Exercise - psychology
Fatigue - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Home Care Services
Humans
Motivation
Personality Inventory
Quality of Life - psychology
Quebec
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Fatigue is prevalent during the postpartum period and may be heightened in postpartum depressed women.
To evaluate the efficacy of a home-based exercise intervention in reducing physical and mental fatigue scores in postpartum depressed women.
Eighty-eight women in the postpartum (4-38 weeks) obtaining a score > or =10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) were randomly assigned to a 12-week individualized home-based intervention (n = 46) or a control group (n = 42). All participants completed a cardiovascular fitness test at baseline. Outcomes were physical and mental fatigue scores and were measured at baseline, posttreatment and 3 months posttreatment.
On the basis of intent-to-treat analyses, compared to the control group, women in the exercise group showed significantly greater reduction in physical fatigue at posttreatment [mean change = -4.07, (95% CI, (-5.15, -2.98)] and 3 months posttreatment [mean change = -4.24, (95% CI, (-5.36, -3.12)]. Significant reductions in mental fatigue with exercise were observed at posttreatment for women reporting lower physical fatigue at baseline.
Fatigue is a common symptom experienced in the postpartum that can be heightened by depression. The findings show that home-based exercise can reduce physical and mental fatigue in postpartum depressed women.
PubMed ID
18373127 View in PubMed
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Illness representation and change in dietary habits in hypercholesterolemic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185149
Source
J Behav Med. 2003 Apr;26(2):133-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Marie-France Coutu
Gilles Dupuis
Bianca D'Antono
Lysanne Rochon-Goyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, C. P. 8888, Succ. Down Town, Canada H3C 3P8. dupuis.gilles@uqam.ca
Source
J Behav Med. 2003 Apr;26(2):133-52
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Diet, Fat-Restricted
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Health Education - methods
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - diet therapy - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Compliance - psychology
Quebec
Self Care
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The association between a patient's illness representation and long-term changes in treatment adherence still needs to be clarified.
to evaluate the association between the representation of hypercholesterolemia and dietary modifications over 1-year, controlling for biopsychosocial factors.
208 hypercholesterolemic Caucasian patients. Measures of dietary intake, illness representation, and biopsychosocial factors were collected at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months.
Two multiple regressions were performed on the 1-year change in dietary habits; one with subjects with elevated fat consumption at baseline, another with individuals with low-moderate fat consumption. Higher scores on items reflecting an accurate illness representation at baseline were associated with greater dietary modification among patients of the first group. For patients with low-moderate total fat consumption, maintenance of dietary habits was associated to lower scores on the perception of stress and symptoms.
To optimize adherence, intervention on illness representation should be adjusted according to initial dietary habits.
PubMed ID
12776383 View in PubMed
Less detail

Incremental cost-effectiveness of pharmacotherapy and two brief cognitive-behavioral therapies compared with usual care for panic disorder and noncardiac chest pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107581
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2013 Sep;201(9):753-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Joannie Poirier-Bisson
André Marchand
Marie-Eve Pelland
Marie-Josée Lessard
Gilles Dupuis
Richard Fleet
Pasquale Roberge
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2013 Sep;201(9):753-9
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents, Second-Generation - economics - therapeutic use
Chest Pain - economics - psychology - therapy
Cognitive Therapy - economics
Cohort Studies
Cost-Benefit Analysis - economics
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - economics
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Panic Disorder - economics - psychology - therapy
Paroxetine - economics - therapeutic use
Psychotherapy, Brief - economics
Quebec
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of two brief cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)-based interventions and a pharmacological treatment, compared with usual care, initiated in the emergency department (ED) for individuals with panic disorder (PD) with a chief complaint of noncardiac chest pain. A total of 69 patients were followed up to 6 months. The primary outcome variables were direct and indirect costs of treatment and PD severity. Panic management (PM) had an ICER of $124.05, per the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, severity score change (95% confidence interval [CI], $54.63-$314.57), compared with pharmacotherapy (paroxetine), with an ICER of $213.90 (95% CI, $133.51-$394.94), and brief CBT, with an ICER of $309.31 (95% CI, $151.27-$548.28). The pharmacological and CBT interventions were associated with a greater clinical improvement compared with usual care at posttest. PM presented a superior ICER, suggesting that it may be a promising treatment option to implement in EDs.
PubMed ID
23995030 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prospective evaluation of psychological distress and psychiatric morbidity in recurrent vasovagal and unexplained syncope.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149081
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2009 Sep;67(3):213-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Bianca D'Antono
Gilles Dupuis
Karine St-Jean
Karine Lévesque
Reginald Nadeau
Peter Guerra
Bernard Thibault
Teresa Kus
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8. bianca.d.antono@umontreal.ca
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2009 Sep;67(3):213-22
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Quebec
Recurrence
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Syncope - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Syncope, Vasovagal - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Syncope is experienced by a third of the population, and in the absence of cardiac pathology is most commonly of vasovagal (VVS) or unexplained origin (US). Psychiatric morbidity has been observed in up to 81% of patients with US but findings with VVS are contradictory. Little is known regarding the chronicity of their psychiatric morbidity.
To determine the psychological profile of patients with recurrent syncope prior to and following diagnostic head-up tilt testing (HUT), and whether it predicts syncope recurrence.
Seventy-three women and 43 men (mean age=48+/-16.6) were recruited from all consenting patients referred for HUT. Psychological status (Psychiatric Symptom Index, Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Blood Injury Subscale) and presence of mood/anxiety disorders (Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders) were evaluated 1 month prior to and 6 months following HUT. Follow-up data were collected for 83 patients (mean age=48+/-17.34).
At baseline, clinically significant levels of distress were observed in 60% of patients. Those with US (negative HUT) had a fivefold greater risk of suffering from a depressive or anxiety disorder compared to VVS (positive HUT) after controlling for significant covariates. There was no significant change in distress level over follow-up, although psychiatric morbidity dropped from 33% to 22% (P=.049). Syncope recurrence was predicted by elevations in baseline psychological distress (OR=1.544, P=.013) independently of lifetime number of syncopes.
Patients exhibited high levels of psychological distress and psychiatric morbidity despite reassurance and education received after HUT. Improved screening for and treatment of psychological distress in these patients is critical.
PubMed ID
19686877 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychological distress and exertional angina in men and women undergoing thallium scintigraphy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172402
Source
J Behav Med. 2005 Dec;28(6):527-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Karine St-Jean
Bianca D'Antono
Gilles Dupuis
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute, Belanger Street East, Montreal, Quebec, H1T 1C8, Canada.
Source
J Behav Med. 2005 Dec;28(6):527-36
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Angina Pectoris - physiopathology - psychology
Exercise Test - psychology
Female
Heart - radionuclide imaging
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - physiopathology
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon - psychology
Abstract
The relation between psychological factors and angina has mostly been studied in male patients with confirmed CAD and few have evaluated this relation during actual provocation of ischemia. This study evaluated gender differences in the association between psychological distress and angina pain experience in 907 Caucasian patients (479 women, mean age = 60 years) undergoing exercise stress testing with thallium scintigraphy. Data were analyzed separately for patients with and without exercise related ischemia using a series of 2 (low/high distress) x 2 (gender) ANOVAs as well as binary logistic regressions. Among all patients, distress and gender were associated with greater risk and intensity of angina pain during testing (p
PubMed ID
16228694 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sex differences in chest pain and prediction of exercise-induced ischemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185660
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2003 Apr;19(5):515-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Bianca D'Antono
Gilles Dupuis
Richard Fleet
André Marchand
Denis Burelle
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Québec in Montréal, Montréal, Québec. bianca.d'antonio@internet.uqam.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2003 Apr;19(5):515-22
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - physiopathology
Electrocardiography
Emergency Service, Hospital
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Pain Measurement
Prospective Studies
Quebec
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
To examine sex differences pertaining to pain characteristics in patients presenting to the ambulatory emergency department (ED) with nontraumatic chest pain and to the prediction of exercise-induced ischemia on a follow-up electrocardiogram.
This was a prospective study of 131 women and 202 men (mean age 58 years) consulting the ED with a chief complaint of chest pain. Seventy-eight women and 116 men underwent exercise stress testing following the ED consultation. Chest pain location, extension, intensity and quality were measured. Chest pain was classified as nonspecific, or typical or atypical of angina.
Women received fewer 'typical' angina pain diagnoses (P
PubMed ID
12717487 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.