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A comparison of physical activity environments between South Asians and white Caucasians with coronary heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137210
Source
Ethn Dis. 2010;20(4):390-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Shazareen N Khan
Sherry L Grace
Paul Oh
Sonia Anand
Donna E Stewart
Gilbert Wu
Milan Gupta
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Ethn Dis. 2010;20(4):390-5
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asia, Southeastern - ethnology
Coronary disease - ethnology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
South Asians (SA) are predisposed to developing premature coronary heart disease (CHD), partly due to the early onset of classic risk factors, including physical inactivity. The nature of physical activity (PA) environments in South Asians in Canada remains unknown. Our objective was to examine differences in PA environments for South Asian vs White Caucasian (WC) CHD patients. In a cross-sectional study, 2657 hospitalized CHD patients in Ontario completed The Perceived Environments Related to Physical Activity Questionnaire to assess their home and neighborhood environment, perceived neighborhood safety and availability of recreational facilities. Patients self-reporting their ethnocultural background as WC (N = 1301, 48.6%) or SA (N = 171, 6.4%) were included in this study. South Asians were significantly younger, had lower body mass index, higher levels of education, lower income, were less likely to smoke and reside rurally, and were more likely to be married, have diabetes mellitus and have experienced prior myocardial infarction (MI) than WC patients. South Asians also had lower availability of home exercise equipment and perceived convenience of local PA facilities, but better and safer neighborhood environments than WC patients. Multivariate analyses revealed that SA ethnocultural background remained significantly related to reduced availability of home exercise equipment and fewer convenient local PA facilities. Since physical inactivity is an important CHD risk factor, and SA ethnocultural background is associated with high CHD risk, this may represent a novel target for risk reduction. Thus, further research is required to optimize SA awareness of the need for PA, and access to equipment and facilities.
Notes
SummaryForPatientsIn: Ethn Dis. 2010 Autumn;20(4):48821305843
PubMed ID
21305827 View in PubMed
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The role of systematic inpatient cardiac rehabilitation referral in increasing equitable access and utilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128525
Source
J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev. 2012 Jan-Feb;32(1):41-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sherry L Grace
Yvonne W Leung
Robert Reid
Paul Oh
Gilbert Wu
David A Alter
CRCARE Investigators
Author Affiliation
Kinesiology and Health Science, 368 Bethune College, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sgrace@yorku.ca
Source
J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev. 2012 Jan-Feb;32(1):41-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Artery Disease - rehabilitation
Female
Health Resources - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Risk assessment
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
While systematic referral strategies have been shown to significantly increase cardiac rehabilitation (CR) enrollment to approximately 70%, whether utilization rates increase among patient groups who are traditionally underrepresented has yet to be established. This study compared CR utilization based on age, marital status, rurality, socioeconomic indicators, clinical risk, and comorbidities following systematic versus nonsystematic CR referral.
Coronary artery disease inpatients (N = 2635) from 11 Ontario hospitals, utilizing either systematic (n = 8 wards) or nonsystematic referral strategies (n = 8 wards), completed a survey including sociodemographics and activity status. Clinical data were extracted from charts. At 1 year, 1680 participants completed a mailed survey that assessed CR utilization. The association of patient characteristics and referral strategy on CR utilization was tested using ?.
When compared to nonsystematic referral, systematic strategies resulted in significantly greater CR referral and enrollment among obese (32 vs 27% referred, P = .044; 33 vs 26% enrolled, P = .047) patients of lower socioeconomic status (41 vs 34% referred, P = .026; 42 vs 32% enrolled, P = .005); and lower activity status (63 vs 54% referred, P = .005; 62 vs 51% enrolled, P = .002). There was significantly greater enrollment among those of lower education (P = .04) when systematically referred; however, no significant differences in degree of CR participation based on referral strategy.
Up to 11% more socioeconomically disadvantaged patients and those with more risk factors utilized CR where systematic processes were in place. They participated in CR to the same high degree as their nonsystematically referred counterparts. These referral strategies should be implemented to promote equitable access.
PubMed ID
22193933 View in PubMed
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