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Are segmental MF-BIA scales able to reliably assess fat mass and lean soft tissue in an elderly Swedish population?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275943
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2015 Dec;72:239-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Gianluca Tognon
Vibeke Malmros
Elisa Freyer
Ingvar Bosaeus
Kirsten Mehlig
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2015 Dec;72:239-43
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adiposity
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Body Weight
Electric Impedance
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
The assessment of body composition is an important measure to monitor the process of healthy aging and detect early signs of disease. Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is considered a valid technique for the assessment of body composition but is confined to the clinical environment. Multi-frequency bio-electrical impedance analysis (MF-BIA) might be a versatile alternative to DXA. We aimed to assess whether a segmental MF-BIA scale can be an accurate and reliable tool for the monitoring of body composition in the elderly and whether the presence of metallic prostheses can influence the agreement between the two techniques.
Weight and height were measured in 92 healthy subjects (53 women) aged 80-81 years from the H70 Gerontological and Geriatric study in Gothenburg. Total and segmental fat mass (FM) and lean soft tissue (LST) were estimated by DXA (Lunar Prodigy, Scanex, Sweden) and segmental MF-BIA (MC-180MA, Tanita, Japan). Bland-Altman analyses were performed to assess the agreement between the two techniques. The prediction of DXA-FM by MF-BIA was compared to that of the body mass index (BMI).
MF-BIA showed a significant underestimation of FM and an overestimation of LST that was larger in men than in women. Smaller but significant deviations were found for appendicular LST and SMM. MF-BIA was not superior to BMI at predicting DXA-FM. The lack of agreement between MF-BIA and DXA was not due to the presence of metal prostheses or diagnoses such as hypertension and edema. The prediction equations applied by the device used in this study should be adapted to the elderly population and details about the reference population(s) should be disclosed.
PubMed ID
26456399 View in PubMed
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Dairy product intake and mortality in a cohort of 70-year-old Swedes: a contribution to the Nordic diet discussion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299664
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2018 Dec; 57(8):2869-2876
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Gianluca Tognon
Elisabet Rothenberg
Martina Petrolo
Valter Sundh
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 453, SE 405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. gianluca@gianlucatognon.it.
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2018 Dec; 57(8):2869-2876
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Cheese
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products
Diet
European Continental Ancestry Group
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Milk
Mortality
Nutrition Assessment
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sweden
Yogurt
Abstract
Conflicting results in the literature exist on the role of dairy products in the context of a Nordic Healthy Diet (NHD). Two recent Swedish studies indicate both negative and positive associations with total mortality when comparing key dairy products. There is no consensus about how to include these foods into the NHD.
To study consumption of cheese and milk products (milk, sour milk and unsweetened yoghurt) by 70-year-old Swedes in relation to all-cause mortality.
Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for potential confounders and stratified by follow-up duration, were used to assess the prediction of all-cause mortality by the above foods. The associations of fat from cheese and milk products with mortality were tested in separate models.
Cheese intake inversely predicted total mortality, particularly at high protein intakes, and this association decreased in strength with increasing follow-up time. Milk products predicted increased mortality with stable HRs over follow-up. The association between milk products and mortality was strongly influenced by the group with the highest consumption. Fat from cheese mirrored the protective association of cheese intake with mortality, whereas fat from milk products predicted excess mortality, but only in an energy-adjusted model.
Based on our results, it may be argued that the role of dairy products in the context of a Nordic healthy diet should be more clearly defined by disaggregating cheese and milk products and not necessarily focusing on dairy fat content. Future epidemiological research should consider dairy products as disaggregated food items due to their great diversity in health properties.
PubMed ID
29080977 View in PubMed
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Does the Mediterranean diet predict longevity in the elderly? A Swedish perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139035
Source
Age (Dordr). 2011 Sep;33(3):439-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Gianluca Tognon
Elisabet Rothenberg
Gabriele Eiben
Valter Sundh
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Public Health Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg, Sweden. gianluca.tognon@gu.se
Source
Age (Dordr). 2011 Sep;33(3):439-50
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Longevity
Male
Sweden
Abstract
Dietary pattern analysis represents a useful improvement in the investigation of diet and health relationships. Particularly, the Mediterranean diet pattern has been associated with reduced mortality risk in several studies involving both younger and elderly population groups. In this research, relationships between dietary macronutrient composition, as well as the Mediterranean diet, and total mortality were assessed in 1,037 seventy-year-old subjects (540 females) information. Diet macronutrient composition was not associated with mortality, while a refined version of the modified Mediterranean diet index showed a significant inverse association (HR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.89; 0.98). As expected, inactive subjects, smokers and those with a higher waist circumference had a higher mortality, while a reduced risk characterized married and more educated people. Sensitivity analyses (which confirmed our results) consisted of: exclusion of one food group at a time in the Mediterranean diet index, exclusion of early deaths, censoring at fixed follow-up time, adjusting for activities of daily living and main cardiovascular risk factors including weight/waist circumference changes at follow up. In conclusion, we can reasonably state that a higher adherence to a Mediterranean diet pattern, especially by consuming wholegrain cereals, foods rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a limited amount of alcohol, predicts increased longevity in the elderly.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21110231 View in PubMed
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The Mediterranean diet in relation to mortality and CVD: a Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112519
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Jan 14;111(1):151-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2014
Author
Gianluca Tognon
Lauren Lissner
Ditte Sæbye
Karen Z Walker
Berit L Heitmann
Author Affiliation
Public Health Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, Box 454, SE 405 30, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Jan 14;111(1):151-9
Date
Jan-14-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Records
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Stroke - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to determine whether the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) is associated with reduced total mortality, cardiovascular incidence and mortality in a Danish population. Analyses were performed on 1849 men and women sampled during the 1982-83 Danish MONICA (MONItoring trends and determinants of Cardiovascular disease) population study, whose diet was assessed by means of a validated 7 d food record. The adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern was calculated by three different scores: one based on a classification excluding ingredients from mixed dishes and recipes (score 1); another based on a classification including ingredients (score 2); the last one based on a variant of the latter including wine instead of alcohol intake (score 3). The association between these scores and, respectively, total mortality, cardiovascular incidence and mortality was tested by a Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for several potential confounders of the association. Generally, all three scores were inversely associated with the endpoints, although associations with score 1 did not reach statistical significance. Score 2 was inversely associated with total mortality (hazard ratio 0·94; 95 % CI 0·88, 0·99). This association was confirmed for total cardiovascular as well as myocardial infarction (MI) incidence and mortality, but not for stroke. Score 3 was slightly more associated with the same outcomes. All associations were also resistant to adjustment for covariates related to potential CVD pathways, such as blood lipids, blood pressure and weight change after 11 years of follow-up. In a Danish cohort, the MDS was inversely associated with total mortality and with cardiovascular and MI incidence and mortality, but not with stroke incidence or mortality.
PubMed ID
23823619 View in PubMed
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The Mediterranean diet score and mortality are inversely associated in adults living in the subarctic region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123045
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Aug;142(8):1547-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Gianluca Tognon
Lena Maria Nilsson
Lauren Lissner
Ingegerd Johansson
Göran Hallmans
Bernt Lindahl
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Public Health Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. gianluca.tognon@gu.se
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Aug;142(8):1547-53
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Diet Surveys
Diet, Mediterranean - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - mortality
Nutrition Surveys
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The Mediterranean diet has been widely promoted and may be associated with chronic disease prevention and a better overall health status. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the Mediterranean diet score inversely predicted total or cause-specific mortality in a prospective population study in Northern Sweden (Västerbotten Intervention Program). The analyses were performed in 77,151 participants (whose diet was measured by means of a validated FFQ) by Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for several potential confounders. The Mediterranean diet score was inversely associated with all-cause mortality in men [HR = 0.96 (95% CI = 0.93, 0.99)] and women [HR = 0.95 (95% CI = 0.91, 0.99)], although not in obese men. In men, but not in women, the score was inversely associated with total cancer mortality [HR = 0.92 (95% CI = 0.87, 0.98)], particularly for pancreas cancer [HR = 0.82 (95% CI = 0.68, 0.99)]. Cardiovascular mortality was inversely associated with diet only in women [HR = 0.90 (95% CI = 0.82, 0.99)]. Except for alcohol [HR = 0.83 (95% CI = 0.76, 0.90)] and fruit intake [HR = 0.90 (95% CI = 0.83, 0.98)], no food item of the Mediterranean diet score independently predicted mortality. Higher scores were associated with increasing age, education, and physical activity. Moreover, healthful dietary and lifestyle-related factors additively decreased the mortality likelihood. Even in a subarctic region, increasing Mediterranean diet scores were associated with a longer life, although the protective effect of diet was of small magnitude compared with other healthful dietary and lifestyle-related factors examined.
PubMed ID
22739377 View in PubMed
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Nonfermented milk and other dairy products: associations with all-cause mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284712
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Jun;105(6):1502-1511
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Gianluca Tognon
Lena M Nilsson
Dmitry Shungin
Lauren Lissner
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Frida Renström
Maria Wennberg
Anna Winkvist
Ingegerd Johansson
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Jun;105(6):1502-1511
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Butter - adverse effects
Cause of Death
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Lactose Intolerance - genetics
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - adverse effects
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Background: A positive association between nonfermented milk intake and increased all-cause mortality was recently reported, but overall, the association between dairy intake and mortality is inconclusive.Objective: We studied associations between intake of dairy products and all-cause mortality with an emphasis on nonfermented milk and fat content.Design: A total of 103,256 adult participants (women: 51.0%) from Northern Sweden were included (7121 deaths; mean follow-up: 13.7 y). Associations between all-cause mortality and reported intakes of nonfermented milk (total or by fat content), fermented milk, cheese, and butter were tested with the use of Cox proportional hazards models that were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, education, energy intake, examination year, and physical activity. To circumvent confounding, Mendelian randomization was applied in a subsample via the lactase LCT-13910 C/T single nucleotide polymorphism that is associated with lactose tolerance and milk intake.Results: High consumers of nonfermented milk (=2.5 times/d) had a 32% increased hazard (HR: 1.32; 95% CI: 1.18, 1.48) for all-cause mortality compared with that of subjects who consumed milk =1 time/wk. The corresponding value for butter was 11% (HR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.21). All nonfermented milk-fat types were independently associated with increased HRs, but compared with full-fat milk, HRs were lower in consumers of medium- and low-fat milk. Fermented milk intake (HR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.86, 0.94) and cheese intake (HR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.91, 0.96) were negatively associated with mortality. Results were slightly attenuated by lifestyle adjustments but were robust in sensitivity analyses. Mortality was not significantly associated with the LCT-13910 C/T genotype in the smaller subsample. The amount and type of milk intake was associated with lifestyle variables.Conclusions: In the present Swedish cohort study, intakes of nonfermented milk and butter are associated with higher all-cause mortality, and fermented milk and cheese intakes are associated with lower all-cause mortality. Residual confounding by lifestyle cannot be excluded, and Mendelian randomization needs to be examined in a larger sample.
PubMed ID
28490510 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.