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2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174812
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Jun 1;62(2):526-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2005
Author
Don Yee
Alysa Fairchild
Mira Keyes
Jim Butler
George Dundas
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. donyee@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Jun 1;62(2):526-34
Date
Jun-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Career Choice
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Middle Aged
Program Evaluation
Radiation Oncology - education
Abstract
Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences.
Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey.
Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns.
Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada.
PubMed ID
15890597 View in PubMed
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Exercise preferences of endometrial cancer survivors: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168163
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2006 Jul-Aug;29(4):259-65
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kristina H Karvinen
Kerry S Courneya
Kristin L Campbell
Robert G Pearcey
George Dundas
Valerie Capstick
Katia S Tonkin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2006 Jul-Aug;29(4):259-65
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Counseling
Endometrial Neoplasms - rehabilitation
Exercise
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Socioeconomic Factors
Survivors
Abstract
Exercise has gained recognition as an effective supportive care intervention for cancer survivors, yet participation rates are low. Knowledge of the specific exercise counseling and programming preferences of cancer survivors may be useful for designing effective interventions. In this study, we examined the exercise preferences of 386 endometrial cancer survivors. Participants completed a questionnaire that included measures of past exercise behavior, exercise preferences, and medical and demographic information. Some key findings were as follows: (a) 76.9% of participants said they were interested or might be interested in doing an exercise program and (b) 81.7% felt they were able or likely able to actually do an exercise program. Participants also indicated that walking was their preferred activity (68.6%) and moderate exercise was their preferred intensity (61.1%). Logistic regression analyses showed that meeting public health guidelines for exercise, being overweight or obese, receiving adjuvant treatment, months since diagnosis, income, marital status, and level of education all influenced exercise preferences. These results suggest that endometrial cancer survivors have unique exercise preferences that are moderated by a number of demographic and medical variables. These findings may have implications for the design and implementation of clinical and population-based exercise interventions for endometrial cancer survivors.
PubMed ID
16871091 View in PubMed
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