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Association of fast-food restaurant and fruit and vegetable store densities with cardiovascular mortality in a metropolitan population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141001
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Oct;25(10):711-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Mark Daniel
Catherine Paquet
Nathalie Auger
Geng Zang
Yan Kestens
Author Affiliation
Sansom Institute for Health Research, The University of South Australia, North Terrace, Adelaide, SA, Australia. mark.daniel@unisa.edu.au
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Oct;25(10):711-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Fast Foods - supply & distribution
Female
Fruit - supply & distribution
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Urban Population
Vegetables - supply & distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Most studies that link neighbourhoods to disease outcomes have represented neighbourhoods as area-level socioeconomic status. Where objective contextual attributes of urban environments have been measured, few studies of food availability have evaluated mortality as an outcome. We sought to estimate associations between the availability of fast-food restaurants (FFR), fruit and vegetable stores (FVS), and cardiovascular mortality in an urban area. Food business data were extracted from a validated commercial database containing all businesses and services in the Montréal Census Metropolitan Area (MCMA). Mortality data (1999-2003) were obtained for the MCMA (3.4 million residents). Directly standardised mortality rates for cardiovascular deaths (n = 30,388) and non-cardiovascular deaths (all causes - cardiovascular deaths) (n = 91,132) and FFR and FVS densities (n/km²) were analysed for 845 census tracts. Generalised additive models and generalised linear models were used to analyse food source-mortality relationships. FVS density was not associated with cardiovascular or non-cardiovascular mortality (relative risk (RR) = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76, 1.36, and RR = 1.14, 95% CI: 0.87, 1.50, respectively). Higher FFR density was associated with mortality in bivariate and multivariable analyses. Relative risks of death (95% CI) per 10% increase in FFR density were similar for both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality: 1.39 (1.19, 1.63) and 1.36 (1.18, 1.57), respectively, accounting for socio-demographic covariates. FFR density is associated with cardiovascular mortality but this relationship is no different in magnitude than that for non-cardiovascular mortality. These results together with null associations between FVS density and mortality do not support a major role for food source availability in cardiovascular outcomes.
PubMed ID
20821254 View in PubMed
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Availability of body art facilities and body art piercing do not predict hepatitis C acquisition among injection drug users in Montreal, Canada: Results from a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142919
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2010 Nov;21(6):477-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Julie Bruneau
Mark Daniel
Yan Kestens
Michal Abrahamowicz
Geng Zang
Author Affiliation
CRCHUM, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. julie.bruneau@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2010 Nov;21(6):477-84
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Piercing - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Female
Geographic Information Systems
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - etiology
Hepatitis C Antibodies - blood
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Proportional Hazards Models
Quebec - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
Cross-sectional associations suggest that body art piercing (BAP) is a risk factor for hepatitis C (HCV) infection among injection drug users. The temporal basis of the relationship has not been established.
Associations between HCV seropositivity, HCV incidence, recent BAP and BAP facility availability were evaluated among IDUs followed biannually between 2004 and 2008 in Montreal, Canada. A geographic information system was used to determine the availability of BAP facilities for each participant. Statistical models included individual and neighbourhood covariates. Logistic regression was used for analysis of HCV seropositivity. Cox proportional hazards regression was used for analysis of HCV incidence.
Of 784 IDUs, 73% were seropositive for HCV. In multivariable logistic regression, HCV seropositivity was associated with BAP availability (OR: 1.32 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 1.6) but not recent BAP. Of 145 initially HCV-negative participants, 52 seroconverted to HCV for an incidence of 27.7/100 person-years (95%CI: 20.9, 36.0). Crude hazard ratios (HR) for the association between HCV infection and BAP variables were: recent BAP, HR 0.98 (95%CI: 0.4, 2.7) and BAP facilities availability, HR 1.43 (95%CI: 1.1, 1.9). After accounting for individual and neighbourhood factors, crude associations between HCV infection and recent BAP and BAP facilities availability were: HR recent BAP, 0.96, 95%CI: 0.3, 2.7; and HR BAP facility availability, 1.21, 95%CI: 0.9, 1.7.
BAP facility availability is a marker of neighbourhood disadvantage associated with HCV seropositivity. Longitudinal analyses accounting for behaviour risk factors and neighbourhood characteristics do not support a temporal association between BAP acquisition, BAP facility availability, and HCV infection among IDUs.
PubMed ID
20541926 View in PubMed
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Plasma interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels during acute hepatitis C virus infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117190
Source
Hepatology. 2013 Jun;57(6):2124-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jason Grebely
Jordan J Feld
Tanya Applegate
Gail V Matthews
Margaret Hellard
Alana Sherker
Kathy Petoumenos
Geng Zang
Ineke Shaw
Barbara Yeung
Jacob George
Suzy Teutsch
John M Kaldor
Vera Cherepanov
Julie Bruneau
Naglaa H Shoukry
Andrew R Lloyd
Gregory J Dore
Author Affiliation
The Kirby Institute for Infection and Immunity in Society, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. jgrebely@kirby.unsw.edu.au
Source
Hepatology. 2013 Jun;57(6):2124-34
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Chemokine CXCL10 - blood
Female
Hepatitis C - blood - virology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
RNA, Viral - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Systemic levels of interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) are predictive of treatment-induced clearance in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). In the present study, factors associated with plasma IP-10 levels at the time of acute HCV detection and the association between IP-10 levels and spontaneous clearance were assessed in three cohorts of acute HCV infection. Among 299 individuals, 245 (181 male, 47 human immunodeficiency virus-positive [HIV+]) were HCV RNA+ at acute HCV detection. In adjusted analysis, factors independently associated with IP-10 levels =150 pg/mL (median level) included HCV RNA levels >6 log IU/mL, HIV coinfection and non-Aboriginal ethnicity. Among 245 HCV RNA+ at acute HCV detection, 214 were untreated (n = 137) or had persistent infection (infection duration =26 weeks) at treatment initiation (n = 77). Spontaneous clearance occurred in 14% (29 of 214). Individuals without spontaneous clearance had significantly higher mean plasma IP-10 levels at the time of acute HCV detection than those with clearance (248 ± 32 versus 142 ± 22 pg/mL, P = 0.008). The proportion of individuals with spontaneous clearance was 0% (0 of 22, P = 0.048) and 16% (27 of 165) and in those with and without plasma IP-10 levels =380 pg/mL. In adjusted analyses, favorable IL28B genotype was associated with spontaneous clearance, while higher HCV RNA level was independently associated with lower odds of spontaneous clearance.
High IP-10 levels at acute HCV detection were associated with failure to spontaneously clear HCV. Patients with acute HCV and high baseline IP-10 levels, particularly >380 pg/mL, should be considered for early therapeutic intervention, and those with low levels should defer therapy for potential spontaneous clearance. (HEPATOLOGY 2013;).
Notes
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PubMed ID
23325615 View in PubMed
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The rising prevalence of prescription opioid injection and its association with hepatitis C incidence among street-drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127955
Source
Addiction. 2012 Jul;107(7):1318-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Julie Bruneau
Elise Roy
Nelson Arruda
Geng Zang
Didier Jutras-Aswad
Author Affiliation
Research Center, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, 264 René-Lévesque est, Montréal, Québec, Canada. julie.bruneau@umontreal.ca
Source
Addiction. 2012 Jul;107(7):1318-27
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analgesics, Opioid
Female
Hepatitis C, Chronic - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Needle Sharing - statistics & numerical data
Opioid-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Prescription Drugs
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Street Drugs
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine trends in prescription opioid (PO) injection and to assess its association with hepatitis C virus (HCV) seroconversion among injection drug users (IDUs).
Prospective cohort study.
Montreal, Canada.
HCV-negative IDUs at baseline, reporting injection in the past month.
Semi-annual visits included HCV antibody testing and an interview-administered questionnaire assessing risk behaviours. HCV incidence rate was calculated using the person-time method. Time-updated Cox regression models were conducted to examine predictors of HCV incidence.
The proportion of IDUs reporting PO injection increased from 21% to 75% between 2004 and 2009 (P 30 injections per month.
Prescription opioid injectors who do not inject heroin are at greater risk for HCV seroconversion than are those injecting both heroin and prescription opioids. Important differences in age, behaviour and social context suggest a need for targeted outreach strategies to this population.
Notes
Comment In: Addiction. 2012 Jul;107(7):1328-922672378
PubMed ID
22248184 View in PubMed
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Sex, age, deprivation and patterns in life expectancy in Quebec, Canada: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144654
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10(1):161
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Nathalie Auger
Carolyne Alix
Geng Zang
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
Etudes et analyses de l'état de santé de la population, Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Montréal, Québec, Canada. nathalie.auger@inspq.qc.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10(1):161
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Poverty
Quebec
Residence Characteristics
Sex Factors
Abstract
Little research has evaluated disparities in life expectancy according to material deprivation taking into account differences across the lifespan between men and women. This study investigated age- and sex-specific life expectancy differentials related to area-level material deprivation for the province of Québec, Canada from 1989-2004.
Age- and sex-specific life expectancy across the lifespan was calculated for three periods (1989-1992, 1995-1998, and 2001-2004) for the entire Québec population residing in 162 community groupings ranked according to decile of material deprivation. Absolute and relative measures were calculated to summarize differences between the most and least deprived deciles.
Life expectancy differentials between the most and least deprived deciles were greatest for men. Over time, male differentials increased for age 20 or more, with little change occurring at younger ages. For women, differentials increased across the lifespan and were comparable to men at advanced ages. Despite gains in life expectancy among men relative to women, differentials between men and women were greater for most deprived relative to least deprived deciles.
Similar to the US, differentials in life expectancy associated with area-level material deprivation increased steadily in Québec from 1989-2004 for males and females of all ages. Differentials were comparable between men and women at advanced ages. Previous research indicating that life expectancy differentials between most and least deprived areas are greater in men may be due to a focus on younger age groups.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20338059 View in PubMed
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Trends in human immunodeficiency virus incidence and risk behavior among injection drug users in montreal, Canada: a 16-year longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136611
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 May 1;173(9):1049-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2011
Author
Julie Bruneau
Mark Daniel
Michal Abrahamowicz
Geng Zang
François Lamothe
Jean Vincelette
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche du CHUM, Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. julie.bruneau@umontreal.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 May 1;173(9):1049-58
Date
May-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Needle-Exchange Programs - utilization
Prospective Studies
Risk-Taking
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - psychology
Abstract
The authors sought to investigate trends in the incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, evaluate changes in risk behavior, and assess associations between syringe access programs and HIV seroconversion among injection drug users (IDUs) in Montreal, Canada, who were recruited and followed for a prospective cohort study between 1992 and 2008. Methods included Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and time-varying Cox regression models. Of 2,137 HIV-seronegative IDUs at enrollment, 148 became HIV-positive within 4 years (incidence: 3.3 cases/100 person-years; 95% confidence interval: 2.8, 3.9). An annual HIV incidence decline of 0.06 cases/100 person-years prior to 2000 was followed by a more rapid annual decline of 0.24 cases/100 person-years during and after 2000. Behavioral trends included increasing cocaine and heroin use and decreasing proportions of IDUs reporting any syringe-sharing or sharing a syringe with an HIV-positive person. In multivariate analyses, HIV seroconversion was associated with male gender, unstable housing, intravenous cocaine use, and sharing syringes or having sex with an HIV-positive partner. Always acquiring syringes from safe sources conferred a reduced risk of HIV acquisition among participants recruited after 2004, but this association was not statistically significant for participants recruited earlier. In conclusion, HIV incidence has declined in this cohort, with an acceleration of the reduction in HIV transmission after 2000.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21362739 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.