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Assessing inter-rater agreement of environmental audit data in a matched case-control study on bicycling injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116749
Source
Inj Prev. 2013 Oct;19(5):336-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Nicole T R Romanow
Amy B Couperthwaite
Gavin R McCormack
Alberto Nettel-Aguirre
Brian H Rowe
Brent E Hagel
Author Affiliation
Departments of Paediatrics and Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, , Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Inj Prev. 2013 Oct;19(5):336-41
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Bicycling - injuries
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Child
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Observer Variation
Public Health - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Environmental audit tools must be reliable in order to accurately estimate the association between built environmental characteristics and bicycling injury risk.
To examine the inter-rater agreement of a built environment audit tool within a case-control study on the environmental determinants of bicycling injuries.
Auditor pairs visited locations where bicycling injuries occurred and independently recorded location characteristics using the Systematic Pedestrian and Cyclist Environmental Scan (SPACES). Two case groups were defined: (1) where a bicyclist was struck by a motor-vehicle (MV) and (2) where the bicyclist's injuries required hospitalisation. The two corresponding control groups were (1) where non-MV bicycle-related injuries occurred and (2) where minor bicycle-related injuries occurred. Inter-rater reliability of each item on the tool was assessed using observed agreement and ? with 95% CI.
Ninety-seven locations were audited. Inter-observer agreement was generally high (=95%); most items had a 1-2% difference in responses. Items with =5% differences between raters included path condition, slope and obstructions. For land use, path and roadway characteristics, ? ranged from 0.3 for presence of offices and cleanliness to 0.9 for schools and number of lanes; overall, 78% of items had at least substantial agreement (?=0.61). For bicyclists struck by a MV the proportion of items with substantial agreement was 60%, compared with 73% for non-MV related injuries. For hospitalisations and minor bicycle-related injuries, 76% of items had substantial agreement.
Agreement was substantial for most, but not all SPACES items. The SPACES provides reliable quantitative descriptions of built environmental characteristics at bicycling injury locations.
PubMed ID
23364159 View in PubMed
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The associations between objectively-determined and self-reported urban form characteristics and neighborhood-based walking in adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256739
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Elizabeth Jack
Gavin R McCormack
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Drive, N,W, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4Z6, Canada. gmccorma@ucalgary.ca.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:71
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Cities
Environment Design
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Recreation
Residence Characteristics
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Transportation
Walking
Young Adult
Abstract
Self-reported and objectively-determined neighborhood built characteristics are associated with physical activity, yet little is known about their combined influence on walking. This study: 1) compared self-reported measures of the neighborhood built environment between objectively-determined low, medium, and high walkable neighborhoods; 2) estimated the relative associations between self-reported and objectively-determined neighborhood characteristics and walking and; 3) examined the extent to which the objectively-determined built environment moderates the association between self-reported measures of the neighborhood built environment and walking.
A random cross-section of 1875 Canadian adults completed a telephone-interview and postal questionnaire capturing neighborhood walkability, neighborhood-based walking, socio-demographic characteristics, walking attitudes, and residential self-selection. Walkability of each respondent's neighborhood was objectively-determined (low [LW], medium [MW], and high walkable [HW]). Covariate-adjusted regression models estimated the associations between weekly participation and duration in transportation and recreational walking and self-reported and objectively-determined walkability.
Compared with objectively-determined LW neighborhoods, respondents in HW neighborhoods positively perceived access to services, street connectivity, pedestrian infrastructure, and utilitarian and recreation destination mix, but negatively perceived motor vehicle traffic and crime related safety. Compared with residents of objectively-determined LW neighborhoods, residents of HW neighborhoods were more likely (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
24893719 View in PubMed
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A cross-sectional study of the individual, social, and built environmental correlates of pedometer-based physical activity among elementary school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135344
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Gavin R McCormack
Billie Giles-Corti
Anna Timperio
Georgina Wood
Karen Villanueva
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. gmccorma@ucalgary.ca
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:30
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Facility Design and Construction
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Monitoring, Ambulatory
Motor Activity
Parents
Play and Playthings
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Sex Characteristics
Social Facilitation
Socioeconomic Factors
Transportation
Walking
Abstract
Children who participate in regular physical activity obtain health benefits. Preliminary pedometer-based cut-points representing sufficient levels of physical activity among youth have been established; however limited evidence regarding correlates of achieving these cut-points exists. The purpose of this study was to identify correlates of pedometer-based cut-points among elementary school-aged children.
A cross-section of children in grades 5-7 (10-12 years of age) were randomly selected from the most (n = 13) and least (n = 12) 'walkable' public elementary schools (Perth, Western Australia), stratified by socioeconomic status. Children (n = 1480; response rate = 56.6%) and parents (n = 1332; response rate = 88.8%) completed a survey, and steps were collected from children using pedometers. Pedometer data were categorized to reflect the sex-specific pedometer-based cut-points of =15000 steps/day for boys and =12000 steps/day for girls. Associations between socio-demographic characteristics, sedentary and active leisure-time behavior, independent mobility, active transportation and built environmental variables - collected from the child and parent surveys - and meeting pedometer-based cut-points were estimated (odds ratios: OR) using generalized estimating equations.
Overall 927 children participated in all components of the study and provided complete data. On average, children took 11407 ± 3136 steps/day (boys: 12270 ± 3350 vs. girls: 10681 ± 2745 steps/day; p
Notes
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PubMed ID
21486475 View in PubMed
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Does dog-ownership influence seasonal patterns of neighbourhood-based walking among adults? A longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136473
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:148
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Parabhdeep Lail
Gavin R McCormack
Melanie Rock
Author Affiliation
Population Health Intervention Research Centre, Calgary Institute of Population and Public Health, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:148
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Canada
Dogs
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Ownership - statistics & numerical data
Residence Characteristics
Seasons
Walking - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In general dog-owners are more physically active than non-owners, however; it is not known whether dog-ownership can influence seasonal fluctuations in physical activity. This study examines whether dog-ownership influences summer and winter patterns of neighbourhood-based walking among adults living in Calgary, Canada.
A cohort of adults, randomly sampled from the Calgary metropolitan area, completed postal surveys in winter and summer 2008. Both winter and summer versions of the survey included questions on dog-ownership, walking for recreation, and walking for transportation in residential neighbourhoods. Participation in neighbourhood-based walking was compared, among dog-owners and non-owners, and in summer and winter, using general linear modeling. Stability of participation in neighbourhood-based walking across summer and winter among dog-owners and non-owners was also assessed, using logistic regression.
A total of 428 participants participated in the study, of whom 115 indicated owning dogs at the time of both surveys. Dog-owners reported more walking for recreation in their neighbourhoods than did non-owners, both in summer and in winter. Dog-owners were also more likely than non-owners to report participation in walking for recreation in their neighbourhoods, in summer as well as in winter. Dog-owners and non-owners did not differ in the amount of walking that they reported for transportation, either in summer or in winter.
By acting as cues for physical activity, dogs may help their owners remain active across seasons. Policies and programs related to dog-ownership and dog-walking, such as dog-supportive housing and dog-supportive parks, may assist in enhancing population health by promoting physical activity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21375754 View in PubMed
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Environmental determinants of bicycling injuries in Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117935
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:487681
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Nicole T R Romanow
Amy B Couperthwaite
Gavin R McCormack
Alberto Nettel-Aguirre
Brian H Rowe
Brent E Hagel
Author Affiliation
Departments of Paediatrics and Community Health Sciences, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, 2888 Shaganappi Trail NW, Calgary, AB, Canada T3B 6A8.
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:487681
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Alberta - epidemiology
Bicycling - injuries - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Environment Design - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
This study examined environmental risk factors for bicycling injuries, by combining data on bicyclist injuries collected by interviews in the emergency department (ED) with street-level environmental audits of injury locations, capturing path, roadway, safety, land use, and aesthetic characteristics. Cases were bicyclists struck by a motor vehicle (MV) or with severe injuries (hospitalized). Controls were bicyclists who were not hit by a car or those seen and discharged from the ED, matched on time and day of injury. Logistic regression odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for age, sex, peak time, and bicyclist speed with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated to relate injury risk to environmental characteristics. Factors contributing to MV events included greater traffic volume (OR 5.13; 95% CI [1.44, 18.27]), intersections (OR 6.89; 95% CI [1.48, 32.14]), retail establishments (OR 5.56; 95% CI [1.72, 17.98]), and path obstructions (OR 3.83; 95% CI [1.03, 14.25]). Locations where the road was in good condition (OR 0.25; 95% CI [0.07, 0.96]) and where there was high surveillance from surrounding buildings (OR 0.32; 95% CI [0.13, 0.82]) were associated with less severe injuries. These findings could be used by bicyclists and transportation planners to improve safety.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23251192 View in PubMed
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The relations between driving behavior, physical activity and weight status among Canadian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131139
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2012 Mar;9(3):352-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Kenda C Swanson
Gavin R McCormack
Author Affiliation
Population Health Intervention Research Centre, University of Calgary, Alberta, Calgary, Canada.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2012 Mar;9(3):352-9
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Automobile Driving - psychology
Automobiles
Body mass index
Canada
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Equipment Design
Exercise
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Self-Assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Time Factors
Travel
Young Adult
Abstract
Evidence regarding the relative contributions of physical activity (PA) and driving behavior on weight status is limited. This study examined the associations between driving and PA behavior and weight status among Canadian adults.
A random cross-section of Calgarian adults (n = 1026) completed a telephone-interview and a self-administered questionnaire. Weekly physical activity time, daily driving time, BMI, motor vehicle access, and demographic characteristics were captured. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations between driving minutes (0-209, 219-419, 420-839, 840-1679, and = 1680 min/week), motor vehicle access, sufficient PA (210 min/week of moderate-intensity PA or 90 min/week of vigorous-intensity PA), and the likelihood of being 1) overweight/obese vs. healthy weight and 2) obese only vs. healthy/overweight.
Compared with driving = 209 min/week, driving 840 to 1679 min/week significantly (P
PubMed ID
21934155 View in PubMed
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The relationship between cluster-analysis derived walkability and local recreational and transportation walking among Canadian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123872
Source
Health Place. 2012 Sep;18(5):1079-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Gavin R McCormack
Christine Friedenreich
Beverly A Sandalack
Billie Giles-Corti
Patricia K Doyle-Baker
Alan Shiell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. gmccorma@ucalgary.ca
Source
Health Place. 2012 Sep;18(5):1079-87
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cluster analysis
England
Environment Design
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Propensity Score
Questionnaires
Recreation
Walking
Abstract
We investigated the association between objectively-assessed neighborhood walkability and local walking among adults. Two independent random cross-sectional samples of Calgary (Canada) residents were recruited. Neighborhood-based walking, attitude towards walking, neighborhood self-selection, and socio-demographic characteristics were captured. Built environmental attributes underwent a two-staged cluster analysis which identified three neighborhood types (HW: high walkable; MW: medium walkable; LW: low walkable). Adjusting for all other characteristics, MW (OR 1.40, p
PubMed ID
22652511 View in PubMed
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Testing the reliability of neighborhood-specific measures of physical activity among Canadian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149995
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2009 May;6(3):367-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Gavin R McCormack
Alan Shiell
Patricia K Doyle-Baker
Christine Friedenreich
Bev Sandalack
Billie Giles-Corti
Author Affiliation
Dept of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2009 May;6(3):367-73
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Environment Design
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Capturing neighborhood-specific physical activity is necessary for advancing understanding about the relations between neighborhood walkability and physical activity. This study examined the test-retest reliability of previously developed items (from the Neighborhood Physical Activity Questionnaire) for capturing setting-specific physical activity among Canadian adults.
Randomly sampled adults (n = 117) participated in two telephone-interviews 2 to 5 days apart. Respondents were asked a series of items capturing frequency and duration of transportation-related walking, recreational walking, moderate and vigorous-intensity physical activity undertaken inside and outside the neighborhood in a usual week. The test-test reliability of reported physical activity levels were then examined using Intraclass and Spearman's rank correlations, kappa coefficients, and overall agreement.
Participation, frequency, and the duration of transportation-related and recreational walking and vigorous-intensity physical activity inside and outside the neighborhood showed moderate to excellent test-retest reliability. Moderate reliability was found for moderate-intensity physical activity undertaken inside (k = 0.48; ICC frequency = 0.38; ICC duration = 0.39) and outside (k = 0.51; ICC frequency = 0.79; ICC duration = 0.31) the neighborhood.
Neighborhood-specific physical activity items administered by telephone-interview are reliable and are therefore appropriate for use in future studies that examining neighborhood walkability and physical activity.
PubMed ID
19564667 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.