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Antibody kinetics among 8-10 years old respondents to hepatitis B vaccination in a low endemic country and the effect of a booster dose given 5 or 10 years later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149103
Source
Vaccine. 2009 Oct 9;27(43):6048-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-2009
Author
Vladimir Gilca
Gaston De Serres
Nicole Boulianne
Philippe De Wals
Donald Murphy
Gisele Trudeau
Richard Massé
Bernard Duval
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Laval University, Quebec, Canada. vladimir.gilca@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2009 Oct 9;27(43):6048-53
Date
Oct-9-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - immunology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood - immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Kinetics
Male
Quebec
Young Adult
Abstract
Few data are available concerning the persistence of anti-HBs and the effect of booster doses given several years post-vaccination against hepatitis B during preadolescence. The objective of this open-labelled clinical trial was to evaluate the persistence of antibodies after vaccination with three paediatric doses of Engerix-B at the age of 8-10 years and the effect of a booster dose given 5 (Group Y5) or 10 (Group Y10) years later. Anti-HBs were measured before and one month post-primary vaccination, then 5 and 10 years later, before the booster dose, as well as one month and 1 year post-booster. The anamnestic response was defined as a >or=fourfold increase of anti-HBs post-booster (>or=10 IU/L) when compared to pre-booster. Ten years post-primary vaccination, 559 of the 652 initially randomized subjects (86%) were eligible for analysis. Group Y5, 5 years post-booster results: 99% of subjects had detectable levels of antibodies and 96% a titer >or=10 IU/L. The anti-HBs GMTs decreased from 114,489 IU/L one month post-booster to 3354 IU/L 5 years later. Group Y10 results: 10 years post-primary vaccination 96% of subjects had a detectable level of anti-HBs and 85% were above the threshold of 10 IU/L. The GMTs one month post-booster were 31,030 IU/L. The challenge with a booster demonstrated an anamnestic response in 99% of subjects in group Y5 and 100% of subjects in group Y10. All subjects were anti-HBc negative. The booster doses were well tolerated. The excellent anamnestic response observed after the booster dose demonstrates the persistence of immunity in virtually all young adults vaccinated at the age of 8-10 with three paediatric doses of Engerix-B.
PubMed ID
19683086 View in PubMed
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Assessment of naturally acquired neutralizing antibodies against rabies Lyssavirus in a subset of Nunavik's Inuit population considered most at risk of being exposed to rabid animals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297801
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2019 Jan 27; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-27-2019
Author
Julie Ducrocq
Jean-François Proulx
Benoît Lévesque
Gaston De Serres
Heidi Wood
Mélanie Lemire
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada.
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2019 Jan 27; :
Date
Jan-27-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Contact with infected saliva through the bite of a rabid animal is the main route of infection with the rabies Lyssavirus in humans. Although a few individuals have survived the infection, rabies remains the most lethal zoonotic infection worldwide. Over the last century, the dogma that rabies is invariably fatal has been challenged by the survival and recovery of infected animals. In humans, 11 studies have found rabies virus-specific antibodies in unvaccinated individuals exposed to rabies virus reservoir species, suggesting the possibility of asymptomatic rabies virus infection, contact with non-infectious virus or exposure to the virus without viral replication. Two of these studies were conducted in Arctic hunters. Considering the extensive exposure of Nunavik's Inuit to potentially infected animals through hunting, trapping, skinning and the preparation of Arctic carnivores, we analysed archived serum samples from the 2004 Nunavik Inuit Health Survey for the presence of rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies (rVNA) in this sub-population. A total of 196 participants who were considered at highest risk for exposure to rabies virus were targeted. Serum samples were tested for the presence of rVNA using a variation of the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization test, an assay recommended for the quantification of neutralizing antibody titres following vaccination. Our study identified two seropositive individuals among the 196 participants but a review of their medical record and a phone interview revealed previous vaccination. Our results do not provide evidence for naturally acquired rVNA in Nunavik's Inuit population.
PubMed ID
30688040 View in PubMed
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Association between the 2008-09 seasonal influenza vaccine and pandemic H1N1 illness during Spring-Summer 2009: four observational studies from Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144255
Source
PLoS Med. 2010 Apr;7(4):e1000258
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Danuta M Skowronski
Gaston De Serres
Natasha S Crowcroft
Naveed Z Janjua
Nicole Boulianne
Travis S Hottes
Laura C Rosella
James A Dickinson
Rodica Gilca
Pam Sethi
Najwa Ouhoummane
Donald J Willison
Isabelle Rouleau
Martin Petric
Kevin Fonseca
Steven J Drews
Anuradha Rebbapragada
Hugues Charest
Marie-Eve Hamelin
Guy Boivin
Jennifer L Gardy
Yan Li
Trijntje L Kwindt
David M Patrick
Robert C Brunham
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. danuta.skowronski@bccdc.ca
Source
PLoS Med. 2010 Apr;7(4):e1000258
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - pathogenicity
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Observation
Abstract
In late spring 2009, concern was raised in Canada that prior vaccination with the 2008-09 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) was associated with increased risk of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) (pH1N1) illness. Several epidemiologic investigations were conducted through the summer to assess this putative association.
STUDIES INCLUDED: (1) test-negative case-control design based on Canada's sentinel vaccine effectiveness monitoring system in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec; (2) conventional case-control design using population controls in Quebec; (3) test-negative case-control design in Ontario; and (4) prospective household transmission (cohort) study in Quebec. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios for TIV effect on community- or hospital-based laboratory-confirmed seasonal or pH1N1 influenza cases compared to controls with restriction, stratification, and adjustment for covariates including combinations of age, sex, comorbidity, timeliness of medical visit, prior physician visits, and/or health care worker (HCW) status. For the prospective study risk ratios were computed. Based on the sentinel study of 672 cases and 857 controls, 2008-09 TIV was associated with statistically significant protection against seasonal influenza (odds ratio 0.44, 95% CI 0.33-0.59). In contrast, estimates from the sentinel and three other observational studies, involving a total of 1,226 laboratory-confirmed pH1N1 cases and 1,505 controls, indicated that prior receipt of 2008-09 TIV was associated with increased risk of medically attended pH1N1 illness during the spring-summer 2009, with estimated risk or odds ratios ranging from 1.4 to 2.5. Risk of pH1N1 hospitalization was not further increased among vaccinated people when comparing hospitalized to community cases.
Prior receipt of 2008-09 TIV was associated with increased risk of medically attended pH1N1 illness during the spring-summer 2009 in Canada. The occurrence of bias (selection, information) or confounding cannot be ruled out. Further experimental and epidemiological assessment is warranted. Possible biological mechanisms and immunoepidemiologic implications are considered.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20386731 View in PubMed
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Bat rabies in the United States and Canada from 1950 through 2007: human cases with and without bat contact.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157679
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2008 May 1;46(9):1329-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2008
Author
Gaston De Serres
Frédéric Dallaire
Mathieu Côte
Danuta M Skowronski
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Canada. gaston.deserres@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2008 May 1;46(9):1329-37
Date
May-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Chiroptera - virology
Female
Geography
Humans
Male
Rabies - epidemiology - transmission
Rabies virus - isolation & purification
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Since the 1980s, rare cases of rabies in humans in Canada and the United States have been almost exclusively caused by the bat-variant virus.
We reviewed indigenously acquired cases of bat-variant rabies in humans in Canada and the United States from 1950 through 2007.
Of 61 cases identified, 5 occurred after organ transplantation and were excluded from further analysis. A bite was reported by 22 (39%) of the case patients, 9 (16%) had a direct contact (i.e., were touched by a bat) but no history of a bite, 6 (11%) found bats in their home (2 [4%] in the room where they slept) but reported no direct contact, and 19 (34%) reported no history of bat exposure whatsoever. With the exception of California (8 cases) and Texas (7 cases), no state or province had >3 cases. Of the case patients, 76% were men, and 40% were 10-29 years of age. The median incubation period was 7 weeks (
PubMed ID
18419432 View in PubMed
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Bats in the bedroom, bats in the belfry: reanalysis of the rationale for rabies postexposure prophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151279
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Jun 1;48(11):1493-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2009
Author
Gaston De Serres
Danuta M Skowronski
Pierre Mimault
Manale Ouakki
Renée Maranda-Aubut
Bernard Duval
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Laval University, Québec, Canada. gaston.deserres@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Jun 1;48(11):1493-9
Date
Jun-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Chiroptera
Humans
Incidence
Rabies - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
United States - epidemiology
Zoonoses - transmission
Abstract
We assessed the scientific basis and practical implications of recommendations made since the late 1990s to offer rabies postexposure prophylaxis (RPEP) for occult bat encounters, including recommendations to offer RPEP to persons with bedroom exposure to a bat while sleeping without evidence of direct physical contact.
The number needed to treat after bedroom exposure to a bat was calculated as the percentage of population exposed multiplied by the inverse of crude rabies incidence. Bedroom exposure was estimated in a population survey of 14,453 households. Incidence was based on reported human cases in Canada and the United States, 1990-2007.
In the population surveyed, bedroom bat exposure while sleeping and without known physical contact occurred at an annual rate of 0.099%. We estimate that
PubMed ID
19400689 View in PubMed
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The changing age and seasonal profile of pertussis in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190340
Source
J Infect Dis. 2002 May 15;185(10):1448-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2002
Author
Danuta M Skowronski
Gaston De Serres
Diane MacDonald
Wrency Wu
Carol Shaw
Jane Macnabb
Sylvie Champagne
David M Patrick
Scott A Halperin
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Epidemiology Services, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V5Z 4R4. danuta.skowronski@bccdc.ca
Source
J Infect Dis. 2002 May 15;185(10):1448-53
Date
May-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Seasons
Whooping Cough - epidemiology
Abstract
During the postvaccine era in Canada, most cases of pertussis have been reported in children
Notes
Comment In: J Infect Dis. 2002 Nov 15;186(10):1537-8; author reply 153812404179
Erratum In: J Infect Dis 2002 Jun 1;185(11):1696
PubMed ID
11992280 View in PubMed
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The clinical spectrum of the oculo-respiratory syndrome after influenza vaccination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185412
Source
Vaccine. 2003 Jun 2;21(19-20):2354-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-2003
Author
Gaston De Serres
Jean Luc Grenier
Eveline Toth
Suzanne Ménard
Renée Roussel
Michèle Tremblay
Monique Douville Fradet
Monique Landry
Yves Robert
Danuta M Skowronski
Author Affiliation
Quebec National Institute of Public Health, Québec, Que, Canada. gaston.deserres@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2003 Jun 2;21(19-20):2354-61
Date
Jun-2-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Eye Diseases - classification - etiology
Female
Humans
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Respiratory Tract Diseases - classification - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Oculo-respiratory syndrome (ORS), a new influenza vaccine associated adverse event, was identified in 2000. The 2000 case definition (ORS-2000) required the presence of bilateral red eyes or respiratory symptoms or facial edema occurring between 2 and 24h following immunization and lasting 24 h), ORS-persistors (duration >48 h).Overall, the distribution of symptoms was similar between ORS-2000 and other case categories. ORS-early and ORS-late had less ocular involvement, ORS-late and ORS-persistors had more cough and sore throat, ORS-early had more facial edema and ORS-late had less. In comparison to ORS-2000, ORS-early were younger whereas ORS-persistors and ORS-late were significantly older suggesting that clinical manifestations of ORS vary with age with a more rapid induction of symptoms in younger individuals and longer duration for older ones.
PubMed ID
12744866 View in PubMed
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Comparative long term immunogenicity of two recombinant hepatitis B vaccines and the effect of a booster dose given after five years in a low endemicity country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175878
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Mar;24(3):213-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Bernard Duval
Vladimir Gîlca
Nicole Boulianne
Philippe De Wals
Richard Massé
Gisele Trudeau
Gaston De Serres
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Québec, Canada. bernard.duval@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Mar;24(3):213-8
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Child
Cohort Studies
Endemic Diseases
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - analysis - immunology
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Humans
Immunity - physiology
Immunization Schedule
Immunization, Secondary
Immunologic Memory
Incidence
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Vaccination - standards - trends
Vaccines, Synthetic - administration & dosage
Abstract
Few data are available concerning the long term immunogenicity of the pediatric doses of hepatitis B vaccines given to preteenagers. The long term effect of the booster dose in teenagers is unknown. We evaluated the immunogenicity of 2 pediatric hepatitis vaccines after primary vaccination and after a booster dose.
A prospective 15-year follow-up study of the immunogenicity of 2 hepatitis B vaccines was initiated in 1995 in Quebec City, Canada. One year apart, 1129 children 8-10 years old received Engerix-B 10 microg (EB), and 1126 received Recombivax-HB 2.5 microg (RB) vaccine after a 0-, 1-, 6-month schedule. After 5 years, one-third of the 2 cohorts were randomly selected. A booster dose of EB 10 microg or RB 5 microg was administered according to the vaccine used in the primary immunization. Antibodies were measured before, 1 month after and 1 year after the booster injection.
Before the booster dose, anti-HB surface antibody (HBs) was detected in 94.7% of the EB subjects and in 95.2% of the RB subjects (P = 0.85). The geometric mean titer (GMT) was higher in the EB than in the RB group (252 mIU/mL versus 66 mIU/mL, P or =10 mIU/mL. The anti-HBs GMT was 113,201 mIU/mL in the EB and 16,623 mIU/mL in the RB groups (P or =10 mIU/mL. The anti-HBs GMT was 14,028 mIU/mL in the EB and 3437 mIU/mL in the RB group (P
PubMed ID
15750456 View in PubMed
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Comparison of pandemic and seasonal influenza in the pediatric emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137375
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2011 Aug;30(8):633-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Emilio Aguirre
Jesse Papenburg
Manale Ouakki
Patricia S Fontela
Chantal Guimont
Gaston De Serres
Guy Boivin
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche en Pédiatrie du CHUL (CHUQ), Quebec, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2011 Aug;30(8):633-9
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A virus - classification - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - pathology - virology
Male
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Emergency department (ED) presentation of pediatric pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) infection is not well characterized. Our objective was to describe the clinical manifestations of pH1N1 in the pediatric ED. We also compared these characteristics to seasonal influenza A, and explored risk factors for pH1N1 hospitalization.
We conducted a retrospective cohort study at a pediatric hospital in Quebec City, Canada. Subjects were ED patients aged 0 to 17 years with laboratory-confirmed pH1N1 (April-July 2009) or seasonal influenza A (June 2006-March 2009). Clinical and laboratory data were analyzed by univariate and multivariate log-binomial regression.
A total of 127 pH1N1 cases and 110 seasonal influenza cases were identified. pH1N1 patients were older (9.5 vs. 5.6 years; P
PubMed ID
21289529 View in PubMed
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75 records – page 1 of 8.