Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Cognitive factors and willingness to participate in an HIV vaccine trial among HIV-negative injection drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146340
Source
Vaccine. 2010 Feb 17;28(7):1663-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-17-2010
Author
Shayesta Dhalla
Gary Poole
Joel Singer
David M Patrick
Evan Wood
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Vaccine. 2010 Feb 17;28(7):1663-7
Date
Feb-17-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Vaccines - administration & dosage
Adult
British Columbia
Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Users - psychology
Educational Status
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Participation - psychology
Abstract
This cross-sectional study involving a cohort of injection drug users (IDU) examined the relationship between cognitive factors (HIV treatment optimism, self-efficacy and knowledge of vaccine trial concepts) as well as risk factors for seroconversion, and willingness to participate (WTP) in a preventive phase 3 HIV vaccine trial. Willingness to participate overall was 56%. In a multivariate analysis, for a 20-unit increase in a 100-point composite scale, self-efficacy was positively related to WTP (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.95, 95% CI=1.40-2.70). HIV treatment optimism and knowledge of vaccine trial concepts were unrelated to WTP. Aboriginal ethnicity (AOR=3.47, 95% CI=1.68-7.18) and a higher educational level (>or=high school) (AOR=1.96, 95% CI=1.07-3.59) were positively related to WTP. This study provides information on WTP for an HIV vaccine trial. Limitations and future directions are also discussed.
PubMed ID
20044049 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cognitive factors and willingness to participate in an HIV vaccine trial among HIV-positive injection drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127911
Source
Psychol Health Med. 2012;17(2):223-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Shayesta Dhalla
Gary Poole
Joel Singer
David M Patrick
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Psychol Health Med. 2012;17(2):223-34
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Vaccines - therapeutic use
Adult
Canada
Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Users - psychology
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Patient Participation - psychology
Research Subjects - psychology
Risk assessment
Self Efficacy
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - psychology
Vaccination - psychology
Abstract
There are gaps in our knowledge of the role cognitive factors play in determining people's willingness to participate (WTP) in therapeutic HIV vaccine trials. Using a cross-sectional study of HIV-positive injection drug users (IDU), we determined the role of three cognitive factors: HIV treatment optimism, self-efficacy beliefs, and knowledge of vaccine trial concepts in relation to WTP in a hypothetical phase 3 therapeutic HIV vaccine trial. WTP was 54%. Participants tended to be low in HIV treatment optimism (mean = 3.9/10), high in self-efficacy (mean = 79.8/100), and low in knowledge (mean = 4.1/10). Items pertaining to HIV treatment optimism and knowledge of HIV vaccine trial concepts were generally unrelated to WTP. An increase in self-efficacy had a statistically significant positive association with WTP (OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.04-2.46, p 
Notes
Cites: AIDS Care. 2000 Apr;12(2):171-610827857
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2000 Aug 15;24(5):451-711035616
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Nov 1;284(17):2193-20211056590
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2001 Jul 1;27(3):281-811464149
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2001 Sep;11(3):251-611582601
Cites: Vaccine. 2002 May 6;20(15):2004-611983263
Cites: Int J STD AIDS. 2004 Jan;15(1):38-4414769170
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr Hum Retrovirol. 1995 Nov 1;10(3):386-907552502
Cites: AIDS. 1998 May 7;12(7):785-939619811
Cites: AIDS Care. 2005 Jul;17(5):539-4916036240
Cites: AIDS Care. 2006 Jan;18(1):66-7216282079
Cites: Clin Sci (Lond). 2006 Jan;110(1):59-7116336205
Cites: Int J STD AIDS. 2006 Mar;17(3):176-916510005
Cites: Health Psychol. 2007 Jan;26(1):40-917209696
Cites: Expert Rev Vaccines. 2009 Feb;8(2):179-9019196198
Cites: Vaccine. 2010 Feb 17;28(7):1663-720044049
Cites: IAVI Rep. 2009 Mar-Apr;13(2):4-7, 14-620214309
Cites: Addiction. 2010 May;105(5):907-1320331553
Cites: AIDS. 2010 Jul 17;24(11):1749-5620597165
Cites: JAMA. 2010 Jul 21;304(3):321-3320639566
Cites: AIDS Care. 2010 Nov;22(11):1403-920936540
Cites: Curr Opin HIV AIDS. 2010 Sep;5(5):357-6120978374
PubMed ID
22250925 View in PubMed
Less detail

Determinants of condom use: results of the Canadian Community Health Survey 3.1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148778
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;100(4):299-303
Publication Type
Article
Author
Shayesta Dhalla
Gary Poole
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, 5804 Fairview Avenue, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3. shayestadhalla@yahoo.com
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jul-Aug;100(4):299-303
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Child
Condoms - utilization
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - prevention & control
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the independent effects of mood disorder, age, race/ethnicity, personal income, being a current student, having a regular medical doctor and substance use in relationship to condom use at last intercourse in a Canadian population stratified by sex.
We used Cycle 3.1 of the 2006 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS 3.1), a population-based, voluntary, cross-sectional survey of subjects ages 12-85 years. Data collection took place between January and December 2005. From the survey, a study sample of 20,975 people was drawn, consisting of individuals providing valid responses (yes/no) to mood disorder and last-time condom use. The question of sexual behaviours was asked only of those ages 15-49 years. Logistic regression was used to examine individual variables as potential determinants of last-time condom use stratified by sex.
The relationship between mood disorder and condom use was non-significant in both males (AOR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.70-1.04) and females (AOR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.78-1.03). Increasing age was found to be inversely associated with last-time condom use in both males and females. Male factors significantly associated with last-time condom use were being of white ethnicity (AOR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.64-0.79) and being a current student (AOR = 1.28, 95% CI =1.16-1.42). Female factors associated with last-time condom use were being of white ethnicity (AOR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.63-0.79) and being a former drinker (AOR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.63-3.11).
Our results identify important determinants of last-time condom use in both males and females in the CCHS 3.1. These findings may have important implications for the devising and implementation of safe sex programs in a Canadian population ages 15-49 years.
PubMed ID
19722345 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exploring the role of social capital in supporting a regional medical education campus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129607
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2011;11(4):1774
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Patricia Toomey
Neil Hanlon
Joanna Bates
Gary Poole
Chris Y Lovato
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ptoom050@uottawa.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2011;11(4):1774
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Consumer Participation
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Public-Private Sector Partnerships
Social Support
Abstract
To help address physician shortages in the underserved community of Prince George, Canada, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and various partners created the Northern Medical Program (NMP), a regional distributed site of UBC's medical doctor undergraduate program. Early research on the impacts of the NMP revealed a high degree of social connectedness. The objective of the present study was to explore the role of social capital in supporting the regional training site and the benefits accrued to a broad range of stakeholders and network partners.
In this qualitative study, 23 semi-structured interviews were conducted with community leaders in 2007. A descriptive content analysis based on analytic induction technique was employed. Carpiano's Bourdieu-based framework of 'neighbourhood' social capital was adapted to empirically describe how social capital was produced and mobilized within and among networks during the planning and implementation of the NMP.
Results from this study reveal that the operation of social capital and the related concept of social cohesion are multifaceted, and that benefits extend in many directions, resulting in somewhat unanticipated benefits for other key stakeholders and network partners of this medical education program. Participants described four aspects of social capital: (i) social cohesion; (ii) social capital resources; (iii) access to social capital; and (iv) outcomes of social capital.
The findings of this study suggest that the partnerships and networks formed in the NMP planning and implementation phases were the foundation for social capital mobilization. The use of Carpiano's spatially-bounded model of social capital was useful in this context because it permitted the characterization of relations and networks of a tight-knit community body. The students, faculty and administrators of the NMP have benefitted greatly from access to the social capital mobilized to make the NMP operational. Taking account of the dynamic and multifaceted operation of social capital helps one move beyond a view of geographic communities as simply containers or sinks of capital investment, and to appreciate the degree to which they may act as a platform for productive network formation and expansion.
PubMed ID
22087512 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of a regional distributed medical education program on an underserved community: perceptions of community leaders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114368
Source
Acad Med. 2013 Jun;88(6):811-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Patricia Toomey
Chris Y Lovato
Neil Hanlon
Gary Poole
Joanna Bates
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Acad Med. 2013 Jun;88(6):811-8
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Humans
Leadership
Medically underserved area
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
To describe community leaders' perceptions regarding the impact of a fully distributed undergraduate medical education program on a small, medically underserved host community.
The authors conducted semistructured interviews in 2007 with 23 community leaders representing, collectively, the education, health, economic, media, and political sectors. They reinterviewed six participants from a pilot study (2005) and recruited new participants using purposeful and snowball sampling. The authors employed analytic induction to organize content thematically, using the sectors as a framework, and they used open coding to identify new themes. The authors reanalyzed transcripts to identify program outcomes (e.g., increased research capacity) and construct a list of quantifiable indicators (e.g., number of grants and publications).
Participants reported their perspectives on the current and anticipated impact of the program on education, health services, the economy, media, and politics. Perceptions of impact were overwhelmingly positive (e.g., increased physician recruitment), though some were negative (e.g., strains on health resources). The authors identified new outcomes and confirmed outcomes described in 2005. They identified 16 quantifiable indicators of impact, which they judged to be plausible and measureable.
Participants perceive that the regional undergraduate medical education program in their community has broad, local impacts. Findings suggest that early observed outcomes have been maintained and may be expanding. Results may be applicable to medical education programs with distributed or regional sites in similar rural, remote, and/or underserved regions. The areas of impact, outcomes, and quantifiable indicators identified will be of interest to future researchers and evaluators.
PubMed ID
23619079 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nurturing social responsibility through community service-learning: Lessons learned from a pilot project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139660
Source
Med Teach. 2010;32(11):905-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Shafik Dharamsi
Nancy Espinoza
Carl Cramer
Maryam Amin
Lesley Bainbridge
Gary Poole
Author Affiliation
The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada. shafik.dharamsi@familymed.ubc.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2010;32(11):905-11
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Education, Dental
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Pilot Projects
Preceptorship
Questionnaires
Social Responsibility
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Community service-learning (CSL) has been proposed as one way to enrich medical and dental students' sense of social responsibility toward people who are marginalized in society.
We developed and implemented a new CSL option in the integrated medical/dental curriculum and assessed its educational impact.
Focus groups, individual open-ended interviews, and a survey were used to assess dental students', faculty tutors' and community partners' experiences with CSL.
CSL enabled a deeper appreciation for the vulnerabilities that people who are marginalized experience; students gained a greater insight into the social determinants of health and the related importance of community engagement; and they developed useful skills in health promotion project planning, implementation and evaluation. Community partners and faculty tutors indicated that equal partnership, greater collaboration, and a participatory approach to course development are essential to sustainability in CSL.
CSL can play an important role in nurturing a purposeful sense of social responsibility among future practitioners. Our study enabled the implementation of an innovative longitudinal course (professionalism and community service) in all 4 years of the dental curriculum.
PubMed ID
21039101 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.