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New strategies for developing leadership.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179281
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 May;17(2):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Source
Can Nurse. 2005 Mar;101(3):42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Gail J Donner
Mary M Wheeler
Source
Can Nurse. 2005 Mar;101(3):42
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Career Mobility
Humans
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff - organization & administration
Personal Satisfaction
Retirement
Social Perception
Notes
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2005 Apr;101(4):615974283
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2005 Apr;101(4):615974282
PubMed ID
15913274 View in PubMed
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Nurse staffing and work status in medical, surgical and obstetrical units in Ontario teaching hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188341
Source
Hosp Q. 2002;5(4):64-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Linda McGillis Hall
Diane Irvine Doran
G Ross Baker
George H Pink
Souraya Sidani
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Gail J Donner
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto. l.mcgillishall@utoronto.ca
Source
Hosp Q. 2002;5(4):64-9
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Demography
Female
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - standards - supply & distribution
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - manpower
Ontario
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Surgery Department, Hospital - manpower
Abstract
This article reports on the staff mix and work status of nurses in the adult medical, surgical and obstetrical units in Ontario's teaching hospitals. While staff nurses have extensive career experience, most have been on their unit a much shorter period of time. More than one-third of the nursing staff in the study were employed on a part-time or casual basis, with few indicating an interest in moving into full-time positions. The need for enhanced retention strategies on these units is identified, as well as the development of a better understanding of motivating factors for nurses' regarding full-time, part-time or casual work options.
PubMed ID
12357576 View in PubMed
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Nurse staffing models as predictors of patient outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183659
Source
Med Care. 2003 Sep;41(9):1096-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Linda McGillis Hall
Diane Doran
G Ross Baker
George H Pink
Souraya Sidani
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Gail J Donner
Author Affiliation
Nursing Effectiveness, Utilization, and Outcomes Research Unit, Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. l.mcgillishall@utoronto.ca
Source
Med Care. 2003 Sep;41(9):1096-109
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health Status Indicators
Hospitals, Teaching - manpower - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Nursing Staff, Hospital - supply & distribution
Obstetric Nursing - manpower - organization & administration
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Discharge
Patient satisfaction
Perioperative Nursing - manpower - organization & administration
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Pregnancy
Time Factors
Abstract
Little research has been conducted that examined the intended effects of nursing care on clinical outcomes.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of different nurse staffing models on the patient outcomes of functional status, pain control, and patient satisfaction with nursing care.
A repeated-measures study was conducted in all 19 teaching hospitals in Ontario, Canada.
The sample comprised hospitals and adult medical-surgical and obstetric inpatients within those hospitals.
The patient's functional health outcomes were assessed with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and the Medical Outcome Study SF-36. Pain was assessed with the Brief Pain Inventory and patient perceptions of nursing care were measured with the nursing care quality subscale of the Patient Judgment of Hospital Quality Questionnaire.
The proportion of regulated nursing staff on the unit was associated with better FIM scores and better social function scores at hospital discharge. In addition, a mix of staff that included RNs and unregulated workers was associated with better pain outcomes at discharge than a mix that involved RNs/RPNs and unregulated workers. Finally, patients were more satisfied with their obstetric nursing care on units where there was a higher proportion of regulated staff.
The results of this study suggest that a higher proportion of RNs/RPNs on inpatient units in Ontario teaching hospitals is associated with better clinical outcomes at the time of hospital discharge.
PubMed ID
12972849 View in PubMed
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