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The practice of consenting to electroconvulsive therapy in the European Union.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126888
Source
J ECT. 2012 Mar;28(1):4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Gábor Gazdag
Rozália Takács
Gabor S Ungvari
Pascal Sienaert
Author Affiliation
Consultation-Liaison Psychiatric Service, Szent István and Szent László Hospitals, Budapest, Hungary. gazdag@lamb.hu
Source
J ECT. 2012 Mar;28(1):4-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consent Forms
Electroconvulsive Therapy - ethics - standards
Electronic Mail
European Union
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Informed consent
Norway
Switzerland
Third-Party Consent
Abstract
To survey major aspects of obtaining informed consent to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the countries of the European Union.
Leading professionals in the field of biological psychiatry in all European Union countries and Norway and Switzerland were approached by e-mail asking about the national practice of obtaining consent to ECT including the form of consent, the legality of consent by proxy, and consent to anesthesia and maintenance treatment.
A considerable diversity was found across Europe regarding consent to ECT. In Slovenia and Luxembourg, ECT is not available at all. Informed consent is needed in written form in most European countries except for Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Slovakia, where verbal consent is sufficient. Italy, Ireland, and Latvia are stricter in their approach because separate written consent is required before each ECT session.
The practice of obtaining informed consent varies from country to country reflecting the individual European Union countries' jurisdiction and their sociocultural traditions as well as their different development of psychiatric services. In line with the increasing cooperation in health care, developing a unified way of obtaining consent for ECT is recommended.
PubMed ID
22343577 View in PubMed
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Public attitudes towards electroconvulsive therapy in the Chuvash Republic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136840
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2012 May;58(3):289-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Andrei Golenkov
Gabor S Ungvari
Gábor Gazdag
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Chuvash State University, Cheboksary, Russia.
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2012 May;58(3):289-94
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Electroconvulsive Therapy
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Public Opinion
Russia
Young Adult
Abstract
Public attitudes towards a given medical procedure can have a significant influence on the employment of that method. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a medical procedure that has received an exceptionally ambiguous public reception since its inception.
To survey the level of information about and attitudes towards ECT in a general population sample of the Chuvash Republic of the Russian Federation.
A randomly selected cohort of 5,373 people was contacted by telephone. The respondents were asked three closed and three open questions.
The response rate was 74.7%. Only 35.2% of those interviewed said they knew anything about ECT. Health professionals and younger respondents were better informed. The two main sources of information about ECT were foreign films and the mass media. The main indication of ECT was thought to be schizophrenia. The majority (63.3%) of the respondents had negative opinions and emotions about ECT.
Limited information about and generally negative attitudes towards ECT were found in the general population of the Chuvash Republic. Gender, age, education level, employment in the health industry, and information source were found to be the determining factors in the knowledge of and attitudes towards ECT.
PubMed ID
21339235 View in PubMed
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