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Aspects of the treatment of mycosis fungoides. A report from the Scandinavian Mycosis Fungoides Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27329
Source
Cutis. 1980 Feb;25(2):155-7, 160-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1980
Author
L. Molin
K. Thomsen
G. Volden
O. Groth
T. Fischer
A. Nordentoft
H. Zachariae
Source
Cutis. 1980 Feb;25(2):155-7, 160-1
Date
Feb-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bleomycin - therapeutic use
Electrons - therapeutic use
Ficusin - therapeutic use
Humans
Mechlorethamine - therapeutic use
Methotrexate - therapeutic use
Mycosis Fungoides - drug therapy - pathology
Neoplasm Staging
Photochemotherapy
Skin Neoplasms - pathology - therapy
Transfer Factor - therapeutic use
Ultraviolet Therapy
Abstract
The Scandinavian Mycosis Fungoides Study Group includes dermatologic clinics in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The results of the first three years of activity are presented herein. In plaque stage, topical nitrogen mustard was highly effective. Preceding intravenous tolerance induction seems to be of no value. PUVA induced equally high remission rates. Both modalities were also highly effective in cutaneous tumor stage. In advanced tumor stage and in case of extracutaneous involvement systemic chemotherapy was given. Topical treatment alone was more effective on the cutaneous lesions including tumors than systemic chemotherapy alone. Therefore a combination of topical and systemic treatment is recommended in advanced stages of mycosis fungoides.
PubMed ID
6153595 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Oct 10;111(24):2960-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-1991
Author
N J Mørk
J. Austad
S. Helland
P. Thune
G. Volden
E. Falk
Author Affiliation
Hudavdelingen, Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Oct 10;111(24):2960-2
Date
Oct-10-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Female
Hemangioma - radiotherapy - surgery
Humans
Laser Surgery - methods
Lasers - therapeutic use
Nevus - radiotherapy - surgery
Skin Diseases - radiotherapy - surgery
Skin Neoplasms - radiotherapy - surgery
Abstract
This article reviews the different lasers used in dermatology. Special emphasis is placed on the treatment of naevus flammeus ("portwine stain") where lasers are the treatment of choice. Argon laser and pulsed dye laser are the main lasers used in vascular skin diseases, and the article focuses on these two types. Copper vapour laser, neodymium-YAG-laser and CO2-laser are also presented. Information is provided about the availability of laser technology in the different health regions in Norway.
PubMed ID
1948901 View in PubMed
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Higher incidence of asymptomatic gonorrhoea in men with initial infection than with reinfection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240245
Source
Br J Vener Dis. 1984 Aug;60(4):274
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1984
Author
G. Kavli
K M Saetrom
T. Gundersen
G. Volden
Source
Br J Vener Dis. 1984 Aug;60(4):274
Date
Aug-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Norway
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Notes
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1978 Oct;54(5):322-3709346
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1980 Dec 1;138(7 Pt 2):880-927008604
Cites: Br J Vener Dis. 1978 Oct;54(5):324-5709347
PubMed ID
6744013 View in PubMed
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[Malignant melanoma--a warning. How to reduce mortality?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25222
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Apr 10;110(10):1202-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-1990
Author
G. Volden
G. Rajka
P. Thune
E S Falk
H K Krogh
Author Affiliation
Hudavdelingen, Regionsykehuset i Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Apr 10;110(10):1202-5
Date
Apr-10-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dysplastic Nevus Syndrome - complications
English Abstract
Humans
Melanoma - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Nevus - complications - congenital
Norway
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Sunburn - complications
Sunlight - adverse effects
Abstract
Incidence of malignant melanoma of the skin has risen rapidly during the last decades. Mortality rates are also rising, although not so much as incidence rates. There is strong evidence that exposure to sunlight is a major factor in the etiology of melanomas. There appears to be no direct cumulative dose-response relationship, except in the case of lentigo maligna melanoma. Episodes of sunburn among children and young individuals seem to be more important as an etiologic factor for melanoma than chronic exposure to the sun. Very high risk of melanoma exists in persons with dysplastic nevus syndrome. Persons with giant congenital nevi are also at increased risk. However, many melanomas arise de novo. It is our intention to reduce mortality by screening families at risk, by early detection and treatment of melanomas, and by education.
PubMed ID
2333644 View in PubMed
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Night and day solar UVB and UVA radiation in areas with midnight sun at 70 degrees and 78 degrees north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237194
Source
Photodermatol. 1986 Apr;3(2):106-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1986
Author
G. Volden
K. Henriksen
Source
Photodermatol. 1986 Apr;3(2):106-8
Date
Apr-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Circadian Rhythm
Humans
Norway
Seasons
Sunlight
Ultraviolet Rays
PubMed ID
3703712 View in PubMed
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Photochemical reactions of Heracleum laciniatum. Influence of dimethyl sulphoxide and corticosteroids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241752
Source
Br J Dermatol. 1983 Jul;109 Suppl 25:137-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
G. Kavli
K. Midelfart
G. Volden
H. Krokan
Source
Br J Dermatol. 1983 Jul;109 Suppl 25:137-40
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Desoximetasone - therapeutic use
Dexamethasone - analogs & derivatives
Dimethyl Sulfoxide - therapeutic use
Humans
Methoxsalen
Photosensitivity Disorders - etiology - prevention & control
Plant Extracts - toxicity
Plants, Toxic
Psoralens - toxicity
Skin - drug effects - radiation effects
Ultraviolet Rays
Abstract
Phytophotodermatitis of Heracleum laciniatum is quite common in Tromsø during the summer months. The clinical picture varies from mild to severe erythematous reactions with or without vesicles or bullae on the exposed parts of the body. Phototoxic reactions of Heracleum laciniatum are reported. The influences on phototoxic reactions by bergapten (5-methoxypsoralen) and UV-A by treating the skin with a membrane labilizing agent, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), and a membrane stabilizing agent, the steroid desoximethasone, are evaluated.
PubMed ID
6860581 View in PubMed
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Ultraviolet radiation at high latitudes and the risk of skin cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4163
Source
Photodermatol. 1989 Jun;6(3):110-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
K. Henriksen
K. Stamnes
G. Volden
E S Falk
Author Affiliation
Auroral Observatory, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Photodermatol. 1989 Jun;6(3):110-7
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Atmosphere
Darkness
Humans
Norway
Ozone
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology
Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet
Spectrum Analysis
Sunlight - adverse effects
Time Factors
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Abstract
Solar irradiance in the spectral region 280 to 800 nm was measured with a double monochromator at 2 locations in Norway, Tromsø (69.7 degrees N) and Longyearbyen (78.2 degrees N). During the observational (midnight sun) period in Longyearbyen, the maximum UVB irradiance recorded was less than 0.3 W/m2, and no radiation was detected for wavelengths below 300 nm. Such low levels are believed to be a consequence of the low solar elevation angle and the high ozone content of the Arctic ozone layer, which absorbs the incident UV light. With levels between 280 and 350 DU over the period of study, Tromsø and Longyearbyen recorded only one-ninth of the calculated UVB radiation at the equator. There is therefore a considerably higher risk of radiation damage to the skin in equatorial regions (controlling for skin type), a finding that agrees with the statistical evidence for a 7-8 times higher rate of skin cancer in the white population of equatorial countries.
PubMed ID
2762201 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.