Skip header and navigation

Refine By

37 records – page 1 of 4.

Anxiety in early pregnancy: prevalence and contributing factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105226
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2014 Jun;17(3):221-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
C. Rubertsson
J. Hellström
M. Cross
G. Sydsjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Uppsala University, 751 85, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2014 Jun;17(3):221-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Fear
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Maternal Age
Parturition - psychology
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First - psychology
Pregnant Women - psychology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Antenatal anxiety symptoms are not only a health problem for the expectant mother. Research has found that maternal anxiety may also have an impact on the developing baby. Therefore, it is important to estimate the prevalence of maternal anxiety and associated factors. The current study aims to estimate the prevalence of anxiety symptoms during the first trimester of pregnancy and to identify associated risk factors. Secondly, to investigate other factors associated with anxiety during early pregnancy including fear of childbirth and a preference for cesarean section. In a population-based community sample of 1,175 pregnant women, 916 women (78%) were investigated in the first trimester (gestation week 8-12). The Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS-A) was used to measure anxiety symptoms. The prevalence of anxiety symptoms (HADS-A scores=8 during pregnancy) was 15.6% in early pregnancy. Women under 25 years of age were at an increased risk of anxiety symptoms during early pregnancy (OR 2.6, CI 1.7-4.0). Women who reported a language other than Swedish as their native language (OR 4.2, CI 2.7-7.0), reported high school as their highest level of education (OR 1.6, CI 1.1-2.3), were unemployed (OR 3.5, CI 2.1-5.8), used nicotine before pregnancy (OR 1.7, CI 1.1-2.5), and had a self-reported psychiatric history of either depression (OR 3.8, CI 2.6-5.6) or anxiety (OR 5.2, CI 3.5-7.9) before their current pregnancy were all at an increased risk of anxiety symptoms during early pregnancy. Anxiety symptoms during pregnancy increased the rate of fear of birth (OR 3.0, CI 1.9-4.7) and a preference for cesarean section (OR 1.7, CI 1.0-2.8). Caregivers should pay careful attention to history of mental illness to be able to identify women with symptoms of anxiety during early pregnancy. When presenting with symptoms of anxiety, the women might need counseling and or treatment in order to decrease her anxiety.
PubMed ID
24442712 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes about donor information differ greatly between IVF couples using their own gametes and those receiving or donating oocytes or sperm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280849
Source
J Assist Reprod Genet. 2016 Jun;33(6):703-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Agneta Skoog Svanberg
G. Sydsjö
M. Bladh
C. Lampic
Source
J Assist Reprod Genet. 2016 Jun;33(6):703-10
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Family Characteristics
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oocyte Donation - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Spermatozoa
Sweden
Tissue Donors - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
The objective of the study is to examine attitudes towards aspects of donation treatment based on a national Swedish sample of gamete donors and couples undergoing assisted reproductive techniques (ART).
The present study was part of the Swedish study on gamete donation, a prospective longitudinal cohort study including all fertility clinics performing gamete donation in Sweden. The sample comprised 164 oocyte donors, 89 sperm donors, 251 people treated with their own gametes (in vitro fertilisation (IVF)), 213 oocyte recipients and 487 sperm recipients. A study-specific questionnaire was used.
Attitudes vary widely between couples using their own gametes for IVF and those receiving or donating oocyte or sperm. The groups differed in their responses to most questions. Oocyte and sperm donors were more likely to agree with the statements "The donor should be informed if the donation results in a child" and "Offspring should receive some information about the donor during mature adolescence" than recipients of donated gametes and couples treated with their own gametes.
Donor recipients, IVF couples and donors expressed different attitudes towards openness and information when it came to gamete donation, and those differences seemed to depend on their current reproductive situation.
Notes
Cites: Med J Aust. 2003 Feb 3;178(3):127-912558484
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2013 Sep;28(9):2432-923756704
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2004 Oct;19(10):2415-915310730
Cites: Public Underst Sci. 2009 Jan;18(1):61-7719579535
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2009 Aug;24(8):1930-819414865
Cites: Ups J Med Sci. 2013 Aug;118(3):187-9523786323
Cites: J Assist Reprod Genet. 2009 May;26(5):231-819472047
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2008 Apr;23(4):904-1118258766
Cites: Psychol Health. 2011 Sep;26(9):1113-2721929476
PubMed ID
27059774 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes towards disclosure and relationship to donor offspring among a national cohort of identity-release oocyte and sperm donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262164
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Sep;29(9):1978-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
C. Lampic
A. Skoog Svanberg
G. Sydsjö
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Sep;29(9):1978-86
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Disclosure
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Insemination, Artificial, Heterologous
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oocytes
Prospective Studies
Psychology
Spermatozoa
Sweden
Tissue Donors - psychology
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Abstract
What are oocyte donors and sperm donors' attitudes towards disclosure and relationship to donor offspring?
Oocyte and sperm donors in an identity-release donor programme support disclosure to donor offspring and have overall positive or neutral attitudes towards future contact with offspring.
There is a global trend towards open-identity gamete donation with an increasing number of countries introducing legislation allowing only identifiable donors. While women and men who enrol in identity-release donor programmes accept that they may be contacted by donor offspring, there is limited knowledge of their attitudes towards disclosure to donor offspring and how they perceive their relationship to potential donor offspring.
The present study is part of the 'Swedish study on gamete donation', a prospective cohort study including donors at all fertility clinics performing donation treatment in Sweden. During a 3-year period (2005-2008), donors were recruited consecutively and a total of 157 oocyte donors and 113 sperm donors (who did not donate to a specific 'known' couple) were included prior to donation. Participants in the present study include 125 female (80%) and 80 male donors (71%) that completed two follow-up assessments.
Participants completed two postal questionnaires 2 months after donation and 14 months after donation. Attitudes towards disclosure to donor offspring were assessed with an established instrument. Perceptions of involvement with donor offspring and need for counselling was assessed with study-specific instruments. Statistical analyses were performed with non-parametric tests.
A majority of oocyte and sperm donors supported disclosure to donor offspring (71-91%) and had positive or neutral attitudes towards future contact with offspring (80-87%). Sperm donors reported a higher level of involvement with potential donor offspring compared with oocyte donors (P = 0.005). Few donors reported a need for more counselling regarding the consequences of their donation.
While the multicentre study design strengthens external validity, attrition induced a risk of selection bias. In addition, the use of study-specific instruments that have not been psychometrically tested is a limitation.
The positive attitudes towards disclosure to offspring of female and male identity-release donors are in line with previous reports of anonymous and known donors. While our results on donors' general positive or neutral attitudes towards future contact with potential donor offspring are reassuring, a subset of donors with negative attitudes towards such contact warrants concern and suggests a need for counselling on long-term consequences of donating gametes.
The 'Swedish study on gamete donation' was funded by the Swedish Research Council, the Swedish Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, and the Regional Research Council in Uppsala-Örebro. There are no conflicts of interest to declare.
Notes
Cites: Hum Reprod. 1995 Nov;10(11):3073-68747077
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2003 May;18(5):1107-1412721192
Cites: Hum Reprod Update. 2006 Mar-Apr;12(2):91-10116172110
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(1):78-8116521685
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2007 Jun;22(6):1759-6817522083
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2007 Jul;88(1):231-217531992
Cites: Hum Fertil (Camb). 2007 Sep;10(3):151-817786647
Cites: Hum Fertil (Camb). 2007 Dec;10(4):223-3118049958
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2008 Apr;23(4):904-1118258766
Cites: Ups J Med Sci. 2008;113(3):305-1318991243
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2009 Jan;91(1):22-719084224
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2000 Sep;15(9):2052-610967013
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Sep;92(9):1049-5623611727
Cites: J Community Appl Soc Psychol. 1998 Jul-Aug;8(4):273-8715452938
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2009 May;24(5):1099-10519164306
Cites: J Assist Reprod Genet. 2009 May;26(5):231-819472047
Cites: Hum Reprod Update. 2009 Sep-Oct;15(5):499-51519443709
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2011 Jan;26(1):266-7221088014
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2011 Mar;26(3):638-4521177310
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2011 Apr;26(4):853-6021212053
Cites: BJOG. 2011 Aug;118(9):1067-7221481152
Cites: BJOG. 2012 Jan;119(1):33-922004406
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Aug;91(8):944-5122536824
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2012 Oct;27(10):2998-300722859508
Cites: Hum Reprod Update. 2013 Jan-Feb;19(1):37-5123146866
Cites: Reprod Biomed Online. 2012 Dec;25(7):670-723063814
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2013 Mar;28(3):560-523315060
Cites: J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2005 Mar;26(1):15-2215962718
PubMed ID
25030191 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in sick leave rates and the use of pregnancy-associated social benefits among pregnant Swedish women: an outcomes study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64228
Source
J Womens Health. 1998 Mar;7(2):249-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
A. Sydsjö
G. Sydsjö
B. Wijma
B. Kjessler
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Sweden.
Source
J Womens Health. 1998 Mar;7(2):249-60
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Attitude
Eligibility Determination
Female
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - economics
Pregnancy outcome
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sick Leave
Social Conditions
Social Security - economics - standards
Sweden
Abstract
We attempted to determine if an amended social security system has lessened the rate of sickness absence during pregnancy in Sweden over the period 1978-1989. We studied the records of 3998 women who gave birth in 1978, 1986, 1988, and 1989 at the University Hospital in Linköping and the Värnamo County Hospital. Retrospective collection of all data concerning the rates and durations of sickness absence during pregnancy, drawing of parental benefit, and use of granted pregnancy benefit was performed from Sweden's standardized social security files. Obstetric variables concerning the course and outcome of pregnancy and delivery, as well as the health status of the newborns, were obtained from standardized and antenatal care and delivery files. Between 1978 and 1989, the rate of sickness absenteeism during pregnancy increased by almost 100% for periods of absence not supported by a doctor's certificate and by about 50% for those with a doctor's certificate. During the same time, the average number of days of sick leave per pregnant woman more than doubled. The changes were most apparent among younger pregnant women. During the decade studied, no significant differences were found with regard to antenatal care, modes of delivery, or the health status of the newborns. In spite of the introduction within the Swedish social security system of more generous rules for pregnant women, the changes in the rates of registered sick leave during pregnancy observed over time were most unfavorable. The present study indicates that the rate of sick leave during pregnancy reflects a complex social phenomenon and cannot be explained solely by an increase in the rate of actual illness or sickness. Such a rate is also likely to depend on general attitudes and expectations among pregnant women, which may vary over time. When amendments in social benefits for pregnant women are considered to improve the health status of the pregnant population, society ought to clearly define the precise aim pursued and the consequences expected to escape unintended socioeconomic results.
PubMed ID
9555690 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children of mothers who are at psycho-social risk. Mental health, behaviour problems and incidence of child abuse at age 8 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34664
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1996 Sep;5(3):162-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
C G Svedin
M. Wadsby
G. Sydsjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1996 Sep;5(3):162-71
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Child Development
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Mental health
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Social Environment
Substance-Related Disorders - complications
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Of the 1575 pregnant women registered at the public Antenatal Health Care Service in the city of Linköping, Sweden, during 1983, an index-group of 78 women were identified who met specific well-defined psychosocial risk-criteria related to drug addiction, mental insufficiency, and particular social circumstances of possible relevance to problems of pregnancy and early child development. Seventy-eight pregnant women who did not meet the inclusion criteria were used as a reference group. The present study was an 8-year follow up in which 47 of the original index children and 57 of the original reference children were examined on indices of mental health, and the presence of child abuse. Their mental health was assessed on the basis of a Symptom and Behaviour Interview (SBI) with the mother and a Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) completed by the mothers and the teachers. The incidence of child abuse was obtained from Social Welfare records. The index children displayed significantly poorer mental health as assessed by the SBI and the CBCL, had a more negative self-image, and child abuse had been investigated in 30% of the index families compared to 1% in the reference families. The study suggests, based on the suboptimal development of the risk children, that screening for early psychosocial risk factors should be done routinely and be combined with early interventions.
PubMed ID
8908423 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children of psychosocial risk-mothers: life events, social interaction, and behaviour problems at the age of 8 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34547
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1996 Dec;24(4):227-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
M. Wadsby
G. Sydsjö
C G Svedin
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1996 Dec;24(4):227-36
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Incidence
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - psychology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Adjustment
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The number of stressful life events experienced as measured on the modified Swedish version of Coddington's questionnaire, and the presence of behaviour problems assessed by Achenbach's Child Behavior Check List (CBCL) were studied in 45 eight-year-old children of identified psychosocial risk-mothers. The mothers' social network was estimated using the Swedish version of Undén and Orth-Gomér's Interview Schedule for Social Interaction (ISSI). These mothers had been identified during early pregnancy. A control group of 57 children of the same age and their mothers without the presence of psychosocial risk-criteria was used as reference. The results indicated that the index children had experienced significantly more life events, and displayed significantly more behaviour problems than the reference children. The mothers in the index group had a significantly poorer social network than the mothers in the reference group. The study suggests that children of mothers, identified early on psychosocial risk criteria develop suboptimally. Therefore, early interventions are of great importance.
PubMed ID
8983093 View in PubMed
Less detail

Disclosure behaviour and intentions among 111 couples following treatment with oocytes or sperm from identity-release donors: follow-up at offspring age 1-4 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121973
Source
Hum Reprod. 2012 Oct;27(10):2998-3007
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
S. Isaksson
G. Sydsjö
A. Skoog Svanberg
C. Lampic
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, S-751 22 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Hum Reprod. 2012 Oct;27(10):2998-3007
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child, Preschool
Disclosure
Family Characteristics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heterosexuality
Humans
Infant
Insemination, Artificial, Heterologous - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Intention
Male
Oocyte Donation - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Sweden
Tissue Donors - legislation & jurisprudence
Tissue and Organ Procurement - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Do heterosexual parents of young children following oocyte donation (OD) and sperm donation (SD) tell or intend to tell their offspring about the way he/she was conceived?
Following successful treatment with oocytes or sperm from identity-release donors in Sweden, almost all heterosexual couples intend to tell their offspring about the way he/she was conceived and some start the information-sharing process very early.
Although the Swedish legislation on identity-release gamete donors has been in effect since 1985, there is a discrepancy between the behaviour of donor-insemination parents and the legal intention that offspring be informed about their genetic origin. The present study contributes data on a relatively large sample of oocyte and sperm recipient couples' intended compliance with the Swedish legislation. DESIGN AND DATA COLLECTION METHOD: The present study constitutes a follow-up assessment of heterosexual couples who had given birth to a child following treatment with donated oocytes. Data collection was performed during 2007-2011; participants individually completed a questionnaire when the child was between 1 and 4 years of age.
The present study is part of the Swedish Study on Gamete Donation, a prospective longitudinal cohort study including all fertility clinics performing gamete donation in Sweden. For children conceived via OD, 107 individuals (including 52 couples and 3 individuals) agreed to participate (73% response). For children conceived via SD, the response rate was 70% (n = 122 individuals, including 59 couples and 4 individuals). Mean age of participants was 34 years (SD 4.4) and they reported a high level of education.
The majority of participants (78%) planned to tell the child about the donation, 16% had already started the information-sharing process and 6% planned not to tell their child about the donation or were undecided. Many were unsure about a suitable time to start the disclosure process and desired more information about strategies and tools for information sharing. Agreement on disclosure to offspring within the couple was related to the quality of the partner relationship. BIAS AND GENERALIZABILITY: There is a risk of selection bias, with gamete recipients preferring secrecy and non-disclosure declining study participation. The results may be regarded as partly generalizable to heterosexual couples with young children following treatment with gametes from legislatively mandated identity-release donors in an established donor programme.
Study funding by Merck Serono, The Swedish Research Council and The Family Planning Fund in Uppsala. No conflicts of interest to declare.
Notes
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2004 Mar;81(3):527-3115037397
Cites: J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2002 May-Jun;31(3):283-9312033541
Cites: J Fam Psychol. 2004 Sep;18(3):443-5215382969
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1995 May;40(9):1213-207610427
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2005 Jan;20(1):239-5215539443
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2005 Mar;20(3):820-415677679
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2005 Mar;20(3):810-915677680
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2005 Nov;20(11):3248-5616006458
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2005 Dec;59(3):252-6215990268
Cites: J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2005 Dec;26(4):265-7016457422
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(1):78-8116521685
Cites: Sociol Health Illn. 2006 Apr;28(3):261-8316573716
Cites: Hum Fertil (Camb). 2006 Jun;9(2):93-916825110
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2007 Mar;87(3):524-3317141770
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2007 Jun;22(6):1759-6817522083
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2007 Sep;22(9):2566-7117588957
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2008 Jan;89(1):179-8717678901
Cites: J Fam Nurs. 2008 Feb;14(1):33-5518281642
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2009 May;24(5):1099-10519164306
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2009 Aug;24(8):1909-1919398766
Cites: J Assist Reprod Genet. 2009 May;26(5):231-819472047
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2010 May 1;93(7):2236-4619285663
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2010 Oct;25(10):2535-4220679252
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2010 Oct;25(10):2527-3420719810
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2011 Apr;26(4):853-6021212053
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2011 Sep;26(9):2415-2421708794
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2011 Oct;26(10):2783-9021803758
Cites: J Fam Psychol. 2012 Feb;26(1):1-1022040353
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2012 Mar;27(3):779-8622252089
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2000 Sep;15(9):2041-5110967012
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2000 Sep;15(9):2052-610967013
Cites: J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2000 Dec;21(4):193-20311191166
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2001 Sep;16(9):1792-611527877
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2002 May;17(5):1407-811980773
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2004 Jun;81(6):1565-7115193478
PubMed ID
22859508 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of an intervention programme to support mothers and babies at psychosocial risk: assessment of mother/child interaction and mother's perceptions of benefit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58601
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2001 May;9(3):125-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
M. Wadsby
G. Sydsjö
C G Svedin
Author Affiliation
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Health and Environment, Faculty of Health Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. Marie.Wadsby@ihm.liu.se
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2001 May;9(3):125-33
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Intervention Studies
Maternal Behavior
Maternal Health Services - organization & administration
Mental Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - education - psychology
Parenting - psychology
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Social Problems - prevention & control - psychology
Social Support
Sweden
Videotape Recording
Abstract
The outcome of a short-term intervention programme for mothers at psychosocial risk was evaluated. The study included 63 mothers and their 0-6-month-old babies who participated in a 6-week intensive treatment programme. Mother-child interaction was assessed in the beginning and at the end of treatment by two independent staff members based on direct observation, and by two control raters who observed video recordings which were arranged in blind order. The mothers were interviewed about the treatment retrospectively. A positive change in several aspects of mother-child interaction, according to the assessments made by the raters and according to the mothers themselves. The number of mothers who were positive toward the treatment rose from 34 in the beginning of the treatment to 56 at the end. In conclusion, a short but intensive intervention seems to have a positive outcome on mother-child interaction, and was in most cases linked to a positive attitude.
PubMed ID
11560728 View in PubMed
Less detail

A follow-up study of postpartum depressed women: recurrent maternal depressive symptoms and child behavior after four years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163306
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2007;10(4):141-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
A. Josefsson
G. Sydsjö
Author Affiliation
Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. ann.josefsson@lio.se
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2007;10(4):141-5
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Depression, Postpartum - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Mothers - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and self reported health of women who have shown previous postpartum depressive symptoms. To examine the behavior of four-year-old children born to mothers affected by postpartum depression.
Longitudinal study. The index group (n = 251) constituted of all women with postpartum depressive symptoms on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), in a population-based study made in the late 1990s. The control group (n = 502) consisted of women without postpartum depressive symptoms on the EPDS at the same occasion. Approximately four years after delivery these women were asked to answer a short questionnaire on general health, the EPDS, and also to assess their child's behavior with the Richman Pre-School Behaviour Checklist.
Women with a history of postpartum depressive symptoms were approximately 6 times more likely to have recurrent depressive symptoms (OR = 5.82, 95% CI: 3.79-8.93), compared to those without postpartum depressive symptoms, and they were also more likely to experience physical and mental illness. Although postpartum depressive symptoms in the mothers were involved in explaining the likelihood of behavioral problems in their four-year-old children, mothers with current depressive symptoms were the most likely to have a child with behavioral problems (OR = 4.71, 95% CI: 1.88-11.78).
Postpartum depressive illness constitutes a risk for future illness as well as maternal perceived behavioral problems in offspring. In order to diminish long-term adverse consequences for the mother and the child there is a great need to recognize and treat women with postpartum depressive symptoms as early as possible.
PubMed ID
17533557 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Frequent sick-listing during pregnancy in spite of a well-functioning parenthood insurance system]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65273
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Nov 22;86(47):4141, 4143-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-22-1989

37 records – page 1 of 4.