Skip header and navigation

15 records – page 1 of 2.

Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jul 15;155(2):177-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1996
Author
E. Etchells
G. Sharpe
P. Walsh
J R Williams
P A Singer
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics, Department of Medicine.
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jul 15;155(2):177-80
Date
Jul-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Emergencies
Ethics, Medical
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Male
Mental Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient compliance
Patient satisfaction
Personal Autonomy
Physician's Role
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Patients are entitled to make decisions about their medical care and to be given relevant information on which to base such decisions. The physicians obligation to obtain the patient's consent to treatment is grounded in the ethical principles of patient autonomy and respect for persons and is affirmed by Canadian law and professional policy. A large body of research supports the view that the process of obtaining consent can improve patient satisfaction and compliance and, ultimately, health outcomes. An exception to the requirement to obtain consent is the emergency treatment of incapable persons, provided there is no reason to believe that the treatment would be contrary to the person's wishes if he or she were capable.
Notes
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1990 Nov-Dec;5(6):506-92266433
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 May 1;152(9):1423-337728691
Cites: CMAJ. 1994 Aug 15;151(4):423-78055402
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Dec 7;252(21):2990-46502860
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1980 Jun;92(6):832-67387025
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1990 Aug;15(8):971-62229694
Cites: JAMA. 1992 Apr 22-29;267(16):2221-61556799
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1988 Jun;148(6):1385-93377623
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1990 Apr;150(4):777-802327839
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1990 Jan-Feb;5(1):29-332299426
Cites: Med Care. 1990 Jan;28(1):19-282296214
Cites: J R Soc Med. 1989 May;82(5):260-32754680
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1989 Jun;57(3):372-92738210
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1989;28(8):829-352705015
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1989 Jan-Feb;4(1):23-302644407
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1988;27(11):1139-453206248
Cites: Med Care. 1988 Jul;26(7):657-753292851
Comment In: CMAJ. 1996 Jul 15;155(2):189-908800077
Comment In: CMAJ. 1997 Jan 1;156(1):17-89053277
PubMed ID
8800075 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bioethics for clinicians: 4. Voluntariness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210831
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Oct 15;155(8):1083-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1996
Author
E. Etchells
G. Sharpe
M J Dykeman
E M Meslin
P A Singer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto Hospital, Ont. eetchells@torhosp.toronto.on.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Oct 15;155(8):1083-6
Date
Oct-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Bioethics
Disclosure
Female
Humans
Informed consent
Institutionalization - legislation & jurisprudence
Male
Malpractice - legislation & jurisprudence
Mentally Ill Persons
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Advocacy
Personal Autonomy
Professional-Patient Relations
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
In the context of consent, "voluntariness" refers to a patient's right to make health care choices free of any undue influence. However, a patient's freedom to make choices can be compromised by internal factors such as pain and by external factors such as force, coercion and manipulation. In exceptional circumstances--for example, involuntary admission to hospital--patients may be denied their freedom of choice; in such circumstances the least restrictive means possible of managing the patient should always be preferred. Clinicians can minimize the impact of controlling factors on patients' decisions by promoting awareness of available choices, inviting questions and ensuring that decisions are based on an adequate, unbiased disclosure of the relevant information.
Notes
Cites: Clin Geriatr Med. 1994 Aug;10(3):513-257982166
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 1976 Aug;34(2):191-81011073
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1983;17(3):139-466836348
Cites: Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1985 Aug;36(8):843-74029908
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1991;32(6):725-312035049
Cites: Bull Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 1993;21(3):321-97908543
PubMed ID
8873637 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Nov 19;117(10):1215-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-19-1977
Author
G. Sharpe
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Nov 19;117(10):1215-6
Date
Nov-19-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospitalization - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Mentally Ill Persons
Nova Scotia
PubMed ID
603852 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Jan 21;118(2):194, 199-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-21-1978
Author
G. Sharpe
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Jan 21;118(2):194, 199-200
Date
Jan-21-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disclosure
Double-Blind Method
Human Experimentation
Humans
Informed consent
Patients
Risk assessment
PubMed ID
757391 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Mar 4;118(5):591-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-1978
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Sep 17;117(6):692-4, 697
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-17-1977
Author
G. Sharpe
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Sep 17;117(6):692-4, 697
Date
Sep-17-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Emergencies
Humans
Informed consent
Jurisprudence
Liability, Legal
Religion and Medicine
PubMed ID
902219 View in PubMed
Less detail

15 records – page 1 of 2.