Skip header and navigation

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Anxiety and family needs of the relatives of cardiac medical-surgical ICU patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224171
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1992 Mar;2(4):15-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
E E Rukholm
P H Bailey
G. Coutu-Wakulczyk
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1992 Mar;2(4):15-22
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - surgery
Family - psychology
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - nursing - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to seek information on the perceived needs of family members visiting a patient in a critical care unit (ICU) of two hospitals located in Sudbury, Ontario. The sample included fifty-one family members visiting cardiovascular surgical patients (CVS) and forty-four family members visiting cardiovascular medicine patients (CVM). The study was part of a larger project conducted on a convenience sample of 166 subjects visiting an ICU patient. Data was gathered using a self-report questionnaire, the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI) (Molter and Leske, 1983), and Spielberger's (1983) State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Information was also collected about worries, knowledge, spiritual needs and the distance of subjects' residence from the site of hospitalization. The sample for both groups was predominantly female. The State Anxiety Scale of the STAI yielded mean scores for both groups which were significantly higher than those obtained by Spielberger (1983) (CVS: z = -3.28, p less than .0001; CVM: z = -3.41, p less than .0001).
PubMed ID
1637490 View in PubMed
Less detail

Families in ICU: their needs and anxiety levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230318
Source
Nurs Times. 1989 Aug 23-29;85(34):68-9
Publication Type
Article

French-language validation of the DACL and MAACL-R.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220413
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1993 Sep;49(5):685-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
A C Beckingham
G. Coutu-Wakulczyk
B. Lubin
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1993 Sep;49(5):685-95
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Psychometrics
Quebec
Reproducibility of Results
Translations
Abstract
The objective of this methodological pilot study was to make a contribution to the French-language validation of the Depressive Adjective Check List (DACL) Set 2 of Forms, E, F, G trait version (Lubin, 1981) and to that of the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List (MAACL-R; Zuckerman & Lubin, 1985). The importance of the study was to validate the French-language translation of these instruments to assess nonclinical depression or dysphoria and affect in two French- and English-speaking convenience sample groups. The Check Lists were administered to 183 Canadian subjects 60 years of age and over of both sexes from rural areas in the provinces of Quebec and Ontario, Canada. In order to ensure that the words chosen carried the same connotation as in the English language, a translation-retranslation technique was used. The data collected from this study suggest that the DACL Form G would be most valid to use with either language and/or site in the protocol for future studies.
PubMed ID
8254076 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nursing curricula and violence issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206384
Source
J Nurs Educ. 1998 Feb;37(2):53-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
M M Ross
L A Hoff
G. Coutu-Wakulczyk
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Nurs Educ. 1998 Feb;37(2):53-60
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Curriculum - trends
Domestic Violence
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing
Sex Offenses
Suicide
Violence
Abstract
This article presents the findings of a survey of Canadian schools of nursing (N = 155) that determined the extent to which violence-related content is addressed in nursing curricula. The study yielded a response rate of 88%. Theoretical content regarding violence against children and women of all ages, and suicide as a response to abuse formed part of the curriculum of all schools of nursing, if only in readings. Child abuse and suicide received the greatest number of hours of instruction, followed by woman abuse, sexual assault, and elder abuse. University schools of nursing provided the greatest number of hours of instruction when compared with other types of schools. Schools in Western and Atlantic Canada provided the greatest number of hours of instruction on woman abuse when compared with other regions of the country. The majority of university schools provided experiential instruction in the area of violence, with the other types of schools providing very little such instruction. Findings revealed a sensitivity to the importance of including content on violence in nursing curricula; however, the approach to this content is largely incidental and heavily dependent on individual faculty interests. Implications of this study point to the need for the systematic inclusion of violence-related content and the sharing of resources among schools of nursing.
PubMed ID
9489679 View in PubMed
Less detail

Tuberculosis surveillance in northeastern Ontario health care institutions: what are we doing?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225453
Source
Can J Public Health. 1991 Nov-Dec;82(6):421-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Bailey
G. Coutu-Wakulczyk
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1991 Nov-Dec;82(6):421-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health facilities
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Questionnaires
Radiography, Thoracic
Schools, Nursing
Tuberculin Test
Tuberculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe the current tuberculosis (TB) surveillance practices in health care facilities in accordance with the Ontario Hospital Act. Data for this survey were collected by means of a mailed questionnaire received from 51 health care facilities and schools of nursing in Northeastern Ontario. With some minor changes, most institutions followed standard TB surveillance practices based on the Ministry of Health legislation. Alterations in surveillance practices generally reflected the literature update in terms of cost-effectiveness. It was also discovered that some institutions (33.3%) failed to account for the relative risk for pregnant employees/students with skin testing and X-Ray screening.
PubMed ID
1790508 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.