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33 records – page 1 of 4.

Cervical cancer screening: are the 1989 recommendations still valid? National Workshop on Screening for Cancer of the Cervix.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211685
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jun 15;154(12):1847-53
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jun-15-1996
Author
E J Parboosingh
G. Anderson
E A Clarke
S. Inhaber
E. Kaegi
C. Mills
Y. Mao
L. Root
G. Stuart
S. Stachenko
Author Affiliation
Disease Prevention Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON. jparboos@hpb.hwc.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jun 15;154(12):1847-53
Date
Jun-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Information Systems
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Morbidity
National health programs - organization & administration
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Preventive Health Services - standards
Program Evaluation
Quality Control
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Although screening for cervical cancer has been shown to be effective in reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease, and despite many attempts to encourage the development of provincial programs, as of 1995 no province had a comprehensive screening program for cervical cancer. Participants at the Interchange '95 workshop, held in Ottawa in November 1995, reviewed the recommendations of the 1989 National Workshop on Screening for Cancer of the Cervix and identified factors that have impeded their implementation. Participants discussed the need for comprehensive information systems, quality control and strategies to increase recruitment of unscreened and underscreened women. They concluded that the formation of a Cervical Cancer Prevention Network involving key stakeholders will facilitate the development and implementation of provincial programs to ensure optimal screening. They agreed that, in the interim, recommendations for practising physicians should remain as they were following the 1989 workshop.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1980 Feb 23;122(4):417-237370844
Cites: CMAJ. 1991 Nov 15;145(10):11951933696
Cites: CMAJ. 1991 Nov 15;145(10):1301-251933712
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1992 Jul;80(1):1-41603476
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 1993;29A Suppl 4:S1-388274301
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1994 Mar-Apr;85(2):125-78012915
Cites: J Med Screen. 1994 Jul;1(3):150-88790508
Comment In: CMAJ. 1996 Jun 15;154(12):1867-98653646
PubMed ID
8653644 View in PubMed
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Colonizing the High Arctic: Mitochondrial DNA Reveals Common Origin of Eurasian Archipelagic Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277845
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0165237
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Kjersti S Kvie
Jan Heggenes
David G Anderson
Marina V Kholodova
Taras Sipko
Ivan Mizin
Knut H Røed
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0165237
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In light of current debates on global climate change it has become important to know more on how large, roaming species have responded to environmental change in the past. Using the highly variable mitochondrial control region, we revisit theories of Rangifer colonization and propose that the High Arctic archipelagos of Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, and Novaia Zemlia were colonized by reindeer from the Eurasian mainland after the last glacial maximum. Comparing mtDNA control region sequences from the three Arctic archipelagos showed a strong genetic connection between the populations, supporting a common origin in the past. A genetic connection between the three archipelagos and two Russian mainland populations was also found, suggesting colonization of the Eurasian high Arctic archipelagos from the Eurasian mainland. The age of the Franz Josef Land material (>2000 years before present) implies that Arctic indigenous reindeer colonized the Eurasian Arctic archipelagos through natural dispersal, before humans approached this region.
PubMed ID
27880778 View in PubMed
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Coupling free radical catalysis, climate change, and human health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291959
Source
Phys Chem Chem Phys. 2018 Apr 25; 20(16):10569-10587
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-25-2018
Author
J G Anderson
C E Clapp
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. anderson@huarp.harvard.edu.
Source
Phys Chem Chem Phys. 2018 Apr 25; 20(16):10569-10587
Date
Apr-25-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Catalysis
Climate change
Feedback
Free Radicals
Humans
Methane - chemistry
Seasons
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Stratospheric Ozone - chemistry
Temperature
Water - chemistry
Abstract
We present the chain of mechanisms linking free radical catalytic loss of stratospheric ozone, specifically over the central United States in summer, to increased climate forcing by CO2 and CH4 from fossil fuel use. This case directly engages detailed knowledge, emerging from in situ aircraft observations over the polar regions in winter, defining the temperature and water vapor dependence of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic conversion of inorganic chlorine (HCl and ClONO2) to free radical form (ClO). Analysis is placed in the context of irreversible changes to specific subsystems of the climate, most notably coupled feedbacks that link rapid changes in the Arctic with the discovery that convective storms over the central US in summer both suppress temperatures and inject water vapor deep into the stratosphere. This places the lower stratosphere over the US in summer within the same photochemical catalytic domain as the lower stratosphere of the Arctic in winter engaging the risk of amplifying the rate limiting step in the ClO dimer catalytic mechanism by some six orders of magnitude. This transitions the catalytic loss rate of ozone in lower stratosphere over the United States in summer from HOx radical control to ClOx radical control, increasing the overall ozone loss rate by some two orders of magnitude over that of the unperturbed state. Thus we address, through a combination of observations and modeling, the mechanistic foundation defining why stratospheric ozone, vulnerable to increased climate forcing, is one of the most delicate aspects of habitability on the planet.
PubMed ID
29638230 View in PubMed
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The development and deployment of a ground-based, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of iodine monoxide radicals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262185
Source
Rev Sci Instrum. 2014 Apr;85(4):044101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
M E Thurlow
D T Co
A S O'Brien
R A Hannun
L B Lapson
T F Hanisco
J G Anderson
Source
Rev Sci Instrum. 2014 Apr;85(4):044101
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Fluorescence
Free Radicals - analysis
Iodine Compounds - analysis
Lasers
Oxides - analysis
Abstract
High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 10(12). The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A(2)?3/2 (v(') = 2) ? X(2)?3/2 (v(?) = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (
PubMed ID
24784629 View in PubMed
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Dissociation and abuse among multiple-personality patients, prostitutes, and exotic dancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229537
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1990 Mar;41(3):328-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990

Dissociative experiences and disorders among women who identify themselves as sexual abuse survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220452
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 1993 Sep-Oct;17(5):677-86
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Anderson
L. Yasenik
C A Ross
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, St. Boniface General Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 1993 Sep-Oct;17(5):677-86
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - epidemiology - psychology
Dissociative Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Multiple Personality Disorder - epidemiology
Ontario
Psychological Tests
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to identify dissociative experiences and disorders among women who are survivors of sexual abuse. Fifty-one women from two different centers who identified themselves as abuse survivors participated in the research interviews. The Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS) were used to collect data. The results indicated that 88.2% of the 51 women had a dissociative disorder of some type. Twenty-eight (54.9%) of the women had a DDIS diagnosis of multiple personality disorder (MPD). The women had high DES scores, a high number of secondary features of MPD, high rates of depression, borderline personality, substance abuse, somatic symptoms, Schneiderian symptoms, ESP/supernatural experiences, suicide attempts, and conversion symptoms. The vast majority of sexual abuse survivors in this sample have extensive dissociative symptomatology and related features. Therapists working with adult sexual abuse survivors should be knowledgeable about dissociation, should thoroughly assess a client's dissociative abilities, and should incorporate these findings into the therapy process.
PubMed ID
8221221 View in PubMed
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Distribution of prescription drug exposures in the elderly: description and implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211430
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1996 Aug;49(8):929-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
G. Anderson
K. Kerluke
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1996 Aug;49(8):929-35
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia
Drug Prescriptions - economics - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medicine
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prescription Fees
Specialization
Abstract
Using data from a comprehensive prescription drug benefit program in British Columbia, we studied the distribution of prescription drug expenditures and exposures in the community-dwelling elderly over a 1-year period. Overall, 84% of the population was exposed to at least one prescription drug. The 11% of individuals with the highest level of use accounted for 50% of total drug expenditures. Individuals 65 to 74 years of age were exposed to a median of 2.2 different drugs during the year compared to a median of 3.8 for those 75 years of age and over. Twenty-four percent of the 65- to 74-year-old population were exposed to six or more different drugs during a 1-year period compared to 37% of the 75 years and over population. Central nervous system and cardiovascular drugs were most commonly responsible for multiple drug exposures. Forty-eight percent of the individuals exposed to six or more different drugs received prescriptions from three or more different physicians. In British Columbia, 98% of the elderly receiving six or more different drugs received at least one prescription from a general practitioner or a family practitioner.
PubMed ID
8699215 View in PubMed
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Editorial comments-Canadian operational and emotional prehospital readiness for a tactical violence event.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143555
Source
Prehosp Disaster Med. 2010 Mar-Apr;25(2):170
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ashley G Anderson
Source
Prehosp Disaster Med. 2010 Mar-Apr;25(2):170
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster planning
Emergency medical services
Emergency Medical Technicians - education - psychology
Humans
Violence - psychology
Notes
Comment On: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2010 Mar-Apr;25(2):164-920467997
PubMed ID
20467998 View in PubMed
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Emotional distress before coronary bypass grafting limits the benefits of surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46315
Source
Am Heart J. 1998 Sep;136(3):510-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
A. Perski
E. Feleke
G. Anderson
B A Samad
H. Westerlund
C G Ericsson
N. Rehnqvist
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Söder Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Am Heart J. 1998 Sep;136(3):510-7
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Coronary Artery Bypass - psychology
Coronary Disease - psychology - surgery
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The inclusion of large, heterogeneous groups of patients for coronary bypass grafting (CABG) surgery has resulted in a more mixed treatment outcome. Thus it becomes important to identify patients who are less likely to benefit from surgery or who may require additional support to improve treatment outcome. The aim of the present study was to examine whether psychological status measured before CABG can contribute to prediction of short- and long-term outcomes of the surgery. METHODS AND RESULTS: One hundred seventy-one consecutive patients from two large university hospitals in Stockholm completed a psychosocial questionnaire before being scheduled for surgery. One year after CABG, patients again completed the questionnaire. Follow-up of medical charts was conducted during the first 3 years after surgery. All major cardiac events (cardiac death, definite myocardial infarction, revascularization, and unstable angina verified by angiography or myocardial scintigraphy) were recorded. Although the overall effect of surgery was excellent in the majority of cases, the patients exhibiting a high degree of distress (anxiety, depression, and tiredness) before surgery assessed their status as being much worse both before the operation and at the 1-year follow-up. Equally important was the fact that patients considered distressed before surgery had significantly higher rates of cardiac events (16%) in the 3-year follow-up period compared with nondistressed patients (5%) (chi-square=5.11, degrees of freedom=1, p
PubMed ID
9736146 View in PubMed
Less detail

Enhanced transfer of organic matter to higher trophic levels caused by ocean acidification and its implications for export production: A mass balance approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296593
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0197502
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Tim Boxhammer
Jan Taucher
Lennart T Bach
Eric P Achterberg
María Algueró-Muñiz
Jessica Bellworthy
Jan Czerny
Mario Esposito
Mathias Haunost
Dana Hellemann
Andrea Ludwig
Jaw C Yong
Maren Zark
Ulf Riebesell
Leif G Anderson
Author Affiliation
GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0197502
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Biomass
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Carbon Sequestration
Computer simulation
Ecosystem
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Models, Theoretical
Oceans and Seas
Seasons
Seawater - chemistry
Sweden
Zooplankton - growth & development - metabolism
Abstract
Ongoing acidification of the ocean through uptake of anthropogenic CO2 is known to affect marine biota and ecosystems with largely unknown consequences for marine food webs. Changes in food web structure have the potential to alter trophic transfer, partitioning, and biogeochemical cycling of elements in the ocean. Here we investigated the impact of realistic end-of-the-century CO2 concentrations on the development and partitioning of the carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and silica pools in a coastal pelagic ecosystem (Gullmar Fjord, Sweden). We covered the entire winter-to-summer plankton succession (100 days) in two sets of five pelagic mesocosms, with one set being CO2 enriched (~760 µatm pCO2) and the other one left at ambient CO2 concentrations. Elemental mass balances were calculated and we highlight important challenges and uncertainties we have faced in the closed mesocosm system. Our key observations under high CO2 were: (1) A significantly amplified transfer of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus from primary producers to higher trophic levels, during times of regenerated primary production. (2) A prolonged retention of all three elements in the pelagic food web that significantly reduced nitrogen and phosphorus sedimentation by about 11 and 9%, respectively. (3) A positive trend in carbon fixation (relative to nitrogen) that appeared in the particulate matter pool as well as the downward particle flux. This excess carbon counteracted a potential reduction in carbon sedimentation that could have been expected from patterns of nitrogen and phosphorus fluxes. Our findings highlight the potential for ocean acidification to alter partitioning and cycling of carbon and nutrients in the surface ocean but also show that impacts are temporarily variable and likely depending upon the structure of the plankton food web.
PubMed ID
29799856 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.