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38 records – page 1 of 4.

Acute low back pain: is the number of patients taking sick leave exponentially related to time?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214519
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1995 Sep;13(3):238-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995

[A hamburger may be included in the diabetic diet. A questionnaire study of glycemic response and dietary treatment in connection with a hamburger meal in teenage diabetics]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48752
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jul 10;151(28):1818-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-10-1989
Author
N K Clemmensen
G L Nielsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jul 10;151(28):1818-20
Date
Jul-10-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood Glucose - analysis
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diet therapy
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Abstract
By means of a glycaemic response study the effect on postprandial blood glucose of a standard hamburger was compared with an ordinary, isocaloric cheese sandwich. Twenty five teenage insulin dependent diabetic patients participated; patients with preprandial blood glucose above 12 mmol/l were excluded. On different days at 3.30 p.m. they consumed a standard hamburger (McDonald's) and an isocaloric cheese sandwich. Blood glucose was measured every half hour during the 3 1/2 hour observation period. The glycaemic response and peak postprandial blood glucose were calculated, and no significant differences in either indices were observed (p greater than 0.05). It is concluded that hamburgers of this specific composition can substitute snack meals in the diabetic diet without risk to the metabolic control.
PubMed ID
2773089 View in PubMed
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Analyses of data quality in registries concerning diabetes mellitus--a comparison between a population based hospital discharge and an insulin prescription registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48317
Source
J Med Syst. 1996 Feb;20(1):1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
G L Nielsen
H T Sørensen
A B Pedersen
S. Sabroe
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine M, Aalborg Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Med Syst. 1996 Feb;20(1):1-10
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Insulin - therapeutic use
Medical Record Linkage
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Registries - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
To evaluate the data quality in the Danish National Registry of Patients (DNRP) and the Prescription Registry in the country of Northern Jutland (487,000 inhabitants) concerning insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and insulin treated diabetes mellitus, a comparison between data in the two registries was made. From the Regional Hospital Registry in the County of Northern Jutland, containing discharge diagnoses from all admissions to hospitals in the county, we identified all patients with the IDDM diagnosis between 1987 and 1993. From the Regional Prescription Registry all insulin prescriptions taken up at pharmacies in the county in 1993 were identified. All persons were identified by their individual identification number (CPR-number), and a record linkage between the two data sources was made. The predictive value of an IDDM-registration in the DNRP was 96% and the corresponding completeness 91%. In the Prescription Registry the completeness was 96%. Both registries seem to be valuable study bases for epidemiological research in diabetes mellitus.
PubMed ID
8708487 View in PubMed
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Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and the risk of cancer: a population-based cohort study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19411
Source
Cancer. 2001 Nov 1;92(9):2462-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2001
Author
S. Friis
H T Sørensen
L. Mellemkjaer
J K McLaughlin
G L Nielsen
W J Blot
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. friis@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer. 2001 Nov 1;92(9):2462-70
Date
Nov-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Incidence
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A recent observational study suggested that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors protects against cancer in general and against breast and female reproductive tract cancers in particular. To explore these hypotheses, the authors examined cancer risk among users of ACE inhibitors in North Jutland County, Denmark. METHODS: Using data from the population-based Prescription Database of North Jutland County and the Danish Cancer Registry, cancer incidence among 17,897 individuals prescribed ACE inhibitors was compared with expected incidence based on county specific cancer rates during an 8-year study period with a mean follow-up of 3.7 years. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for cancers overall and at selected sites. In addition, the authors performed a direct comparison of users of ACE inhibitors with users of beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers (n = 47,579 individuals) by means of a Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Overall, 909 cancer cases were observed among users of ACE inhibitors, with 846 expected based on general population rates, yielding an SIR of 1.07 (95% CI, 1.01-1.15). No risk reductions were observed for cancers of the breast and female reproductive tract, whereas nonsignificantly decreased SIRs were observed for cancers of the esophagus, stomach, and liver. Cancer of the kidney was found in significant excess (SIR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.2). Stratification by duration of follow-up or number of prescriptions revealed no apparent trends, except for a tendency toward decreasing risk with increasing length of follow-up for smoking-related cancers. The direct comparison of users of ACE inhibitors with users of beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers yielded results comparable to those derived from the comparison with the general population, with a hazard ratio for cancer overall of 1.01 (95% CI, 0.93-1.09). CONCLUSIONS: This large, population-based cohort study did not confirm a protective effect of ACE inhibitors on the development of cancer. The excess of kidney cancer observed likely reflects a correlation between hypertension and kidney cancer. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of ACE inhibitors beyond the observation period of this and previous studies. Also, the suggestive evidence of decreased risks for upper digestive system cancers and for smoking-related cancers over time may warrant additional investigation.
PubMed ID
11745304 View in PubMed
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[Antibiotic pre-hospital treatment and the course of meningococcal disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32725
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 May 15;162(20):2882-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2000
Author
H T Sørensen
G L Nielsen
H C Schønheyder
F H Steffensen
I. Hansen
S. Sabroe
J F Dahlerup
H. Hamburger
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Institut for Epidemiologi og Socialmedicin.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 May 15;162(20):2882-5
Date
May-15-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Critical Illness
Denmark
English Abstract
Family Practice
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Meningitis, Meningococcal - drug therapy - mortality
Meningococcal Infections - drug therapy - mortality
Middle Aged
Patient Admission
Prognosis
Referral and Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the effect of pre-hospital antibiotic treatment given by general practitioners to patients with meningococcal disease. It was carried out as a 16-year population-based historical follow-up study based on referral letters and hospital records in the County of North Jutland, Denmark, and included 320 patients with meningococcal disease, of whom 302 were examined by a general practitioner before admission to hospital. The main outcome measure was death. We found that 44 patients (14.6%) were given antibiotic treatment by the referring general practitioner. Nine of these (20.5%) died, compared with 16 (6.2%) patients who did not receive pre-hospital antibiotic treatment. The presence of skin bleeding, petechiae and impaired consciousness were strongly associated with case fatality. Even after adjustment for these variables the odds ratio for death in patients treated with antibiotics was high (3.2; 95% CI 0.9-10.6). In the 15 patients with skin bleeding (ecchymoses, suggillations) the case fatality rate was 100% in patients treated with antibiotics, and 50% in patients who did not receive antibiotics before hospitalization. It is concluded that pre-hospital treatment is mainly given to the most severe cases with expected high case fatality, and this confounding by indication was probably not fully adjusted for with the available data. The results contradict previous findings and provide reason to doubt the benefit of pre-hospital antibiotic treatment in patients with meningococcal disease.
PubMed ID
10860427 View in PubMed
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Birth outcome and risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia following in utero exposure to pivmecillinam: a population-based cohort study with 414 exposed pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58620
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2001;33(6):439-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
H. Larsen
G L Nielsen
M. Møller
F. Ebbesen
H C Schønheyder
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital and Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2001;33(6):439-44
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Amdinocillin Pivoxil - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Carnitine - deficiency
Denmark - epidemiology
Embryonic and Fetal Development - drug effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypoglycemia - chemically induced
Infant, Newborn
Penicillins - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy
Abstract
Concerns have been raised as to the safety of using pivaloyl-conjugated beta-lactam antibiotics during pregnancy as they cause carnitine depletion. Restrictions have been recommended in some Scandinavian countries as drug-induced carnitine depletion could constitute a risk to the developing foetus. One of these drugs, pivmecillinam, is widely used against urinary tract infections but few data exist concerning its safety in pregnancy. In a cohort study, we compared the prevalences of congenital abnormalities, pre-term delivery, low birth weight, low Apgar score and neonatal hypoglycaemia in the offspring of 414 women who had at least 1 prescription for pivmecillinam redeemed during pregnancy with those of the offspring of 7472 pregnant women for whom no drugs were prescribed during pregnancy. The prevalence of congenital abnormalities was 1.7% among 119 infants exposed in the first trimester and 3.7% among the reference group [odds ratio (OR) 0.46; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11-1.86]. We found no significantly increased risks in either pre-term delivery (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.11-1.86), low birth weight (OR 0.57, 95%, CI 0.23-1.41), low Apgar score (OR 2.32, 95% CI 0.30-18.16) or hypoglycaemia (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.18-3.00) that were induced by carnitine depletion. No significantly increased risk in adverse birth outcome was therefore found in women treated with pivmecillinam.
PubMed ID
11450863 View in PubMed
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Birth outcome following maternal use of fluoroquinolones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58584
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2001 Sep;18(3):259-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
H. Larsen
G L Nielsen
H C Schønheyder
C. Olesen
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aalborg Hospital, Section North, 10 Stengade, app. 13-15, Box 561, DK-9100 Aalborg, Denmark. uxhela@aas.nja.dk
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2001 Sep;18(3):259-62
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fluoroquinolones - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Obstetric Labor, Premature - chemically induced
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prevalence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine fetal risk associated with intrauterine exposure to fluoroquinolones. By using on record linkage between a Prescription Database and the Birth Registry in Denmark, the offspring of 57 users of fluoroquinolones and of 17259 patients who had no prescriptive medication during pregnancy, were compared in a cohort study. Among the users, the prevalence rate ratios of congenital abnormalities, preterm birth and low birth weight were 1.30 (95% CI: 0.30-5.30),1.53 (95% CI: 0.62-3.80) and 1.17 (95% CI: 0.15-8.90), respectively. The risk of congenital abnormalities among users of fluoroquinolones during pregnancy was close to unity. Despite these limitations of statistical analysis the study suggested that the use of fluoroquinolones during pregnancy may not be a major risk factor to the foetus.
PubMed ID
11673039 View in PubMed
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Birth outcome of 1886 pregnancies after exposure to phenoxymethylpenicillin in utero.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58508
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2002 Apr;8(4):196-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
B B Dencker
H. Larsen
E S Jensen
H C Schønheyder
G L Nielsen
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University and Aalborg Hospitals, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark. uxliwi@aas.nja.dk
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2002 Apr;8(4):196-201
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Death - chemically induced
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Obstetric Labor, Premature - chemically induced
Odds Ratio
Penicillin V - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the risk of congenital abnormalities, preterm birth and low birth weight after exposure to phenoxymethylpenicillin in utero. METHODS: A population-based follow-up study in the County of North Jutland, Denmark. Birth outcome for 1886 women, who redeemed prescriptions for phenoxymethylpenicillin during pregnancy was compared with the outcome for 9263 women who did not redeem any prescription during pregnancy. RESULTS: The prevalence of congenital abnormalities in 654 users of phenoxymethylpenicillin with or without other drugs during the first trimester was 4.6% compared with 3.6% in the reference group, giving a prevalence odds ratio of 1.25 (95% CI: 0.84-1.86). The prevalence odds ratio was 1.35 (95% CI: 0.59-3.08) in 131 women who were exposed to phenoxymethylpenicillin only. Nine cardiovascular abnormalities were found, giving an adjusted prevalence odds ratio of 1.74 (95% CI: 0.83-3.65). The prevalence odds ratios of preterm birth and low birth weight were 0.83 (95% CI: 0.66-1.04) and 1.02 (95% CI: 0.71-1.47), respectively. CONCLUSION: We found no significantly increased risk of congenital abnormalities, including cardiovascular abnormalities, preterm birth, or low birth weight in women who purchased phenoxymethylpenicillin during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
12047410 View in PubMed
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Birth outcomes in pregnant women treated with low-molecular-weight heparin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63913
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Aug;79(8):655-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
H T Sørensen
S P Johnsen
H. Larsen
L. Pedersen
G L Nielsen
M. Møller
Author Affiliation
The Danish Epidemiology Science Center at the Department of Medicine V, Aarhus University Hospital.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Aug;79(8):655-9
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced
Adolescent
Adult
Anticoagulants - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Female
Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Middle Aged
Obstetric labor, premature
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Pregnancy outcome
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Venous Thrombosis - prevention & control
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Pregnancy and puerperium are associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. Low-molecular-weight heparin is the anticoagulant of choice in pregnant women because, unlike warfarin, it does not cross the placenta. However, there are limited data on the risk of adverse birth outcomes following use of low-molecular-weight heparin in pregnancy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a population-based cohort study to examine the safety of low-molecular-weight heparin use in pregnancy using data from the Pharmacoepidemiological Prescription Database, The Danish Medical Birth Registry and the Regional Hospital Discharge Registry in North Jutland County, Denmark. The birth outcomes in a cohort of 66 pregnant women treated with low-molecular-weight heparin between 1991-98 were compared with the birth outcomes of 17,259 pregnant women who did not receive any prescriptive drugs during pregnancy. RESULTS: No increased risk of malformations, low birth weight or stillbirth was found. However, an increased risk of pre-term delivery was found (odds ratio: 2.11, 95%, confidence interval: 0.96-4.65), which could reflect inherited thrombophilia as an indication of low-molecular-weight heparin. CONCLUSION: We have provided additional evidence of the safety of low-molecular-weight heparin use in pregnancy.
PubMed ID
10949230 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk in users of calcium channel blockers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22102
Source
Hypertension. 1997 May;29(5):1091-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
J H Olsen
H T Sørensen
S. Friis
J K McLaughlin
F H Steffensen
G L Nielsen
M. Andersen
J F Fraumeni
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Division for Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. jorgen@cancer.dk
Source
Hypertension. 1997 May;29(5):1091-4
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Calcium Channel Blockers - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
Ca2+ channel blockers may cause cancer by inhibiting apoptosis or reducing intracellular Ca2+ in certain tissues. Recent findings suggest that drug users are at increased risk for cancer in general and for colon cancer in particular. We conducted a study in one Danish county of 17911 patients who received at least one prescription of Ca2+ channel blockers between 1 January 1991 and 31 December 1993. The patients were identified from records in the National Health Insurance Program, which refunds part of the price of such drugs. Cancer occurrence and rate were determined by use of the files of the Danish Cancer Registry and compared with county-specific incidence rates for various categories of cancer. During the follow-up period of up to 3 years, 412 cancers were observed among users of Ca2+ channel blockers, compared with 414 expected, to yield an age- and sex-standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of 1.00 (95% confidence interval, 0.90 to 1.10). There was no indication of an excess risk in the subgroup of likely long-term users or users of specific drugs. The SIR of colon cancer, a site of a priori interest, was 0.8 (95% confidence interval, 0.5 to 1.1) on the basis of 34 cases. Although the results are reassuring, the lack of association could reflect the relatively short follow-up after registration in the prescription database. Continued monitoring of cancer risk is planned.
Notes
Comment In: Hypertension. 1997 Dec;30(6):1641-29403598
Comment In: Hypertension. 1997 Dec;30(6):1641; author reply 16429403597
PubMed ID
9149671 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.