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Differences in oral health status between institutionalized and non-institutionalized older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228285
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Oct;18(5):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
G D Slade
D. Locker
J L Leake
S A Price
I. Chao
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Oct;18(5):272-6
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
DMF Index
Female
Health status
Humans
Institutionalization
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Oral Health
Random Allocation
Sex Factors
Abstract
Differences in oral health status between independent and institutionalized adults have been difficult to interpret because the latter population is typically older and has a higher proportion of women, confounding any association between institutionalization and disease levels. We undertook an analysis of oral disease amongst institutionalized (n = 149) and non-institutionalized (n = 246) samples of older adults randomly selected from the population in East York, Ontario. When the confounding effects of age and gender were controlled by constructing 67 matched pairs, institutionalized people were more than twice as likely to be edentulous (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.09-4.29). This association was confirmed using data from all subjects in a logistic regression model. Analysis of covariance of data from dentate subjects revealed that the institutionalized seniors had fewer filled teeth (P less than 0.05, controlling for age and sex), but there were no statistically significant differences in the number of teeth which were missing, decayed, or requiring extraction. These findings suggest that antecedent, sociodemographic factors prior to institutionalization are responsible for the higher probability of oral disease in this group of older adults.
PubMed ID
2249414 View in PubMed
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GWAS Identifies New Loci for Painful Temporomandibular Disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282951
Source
J Dent Res. 2017 Mar;96(3):277-284
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
A E Sanders
D. Jain
T. Sofer
K F Kerr
C C Laurie
J R Shaffer
M L Marazita
L M Kaste
G D Slade
R B Fillingim
R. Ohrbach
W. Maixner
T. Kocher
O. Bernhardt
A. Teumer
C. Schwahn
K. Sipilä
R. Lähdesmäki
M. Männikkö
P. Pesonen
M. Järvelin
C M Rizzatti-Barbosa
C B Meloto
M. Ribeiro-Dasilva
L. Diatchenko
P. Serrano
S B Smith
Source
J Dent Res. 2017 Mar;96(3):277-284
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brazil - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Dystrophin
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Loci
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Germany - epidemiology
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Male
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prevalence
Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled
Sarcoglycans
Sp4 Transcription Factor
Surveys and Questionnaires
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a musculoskeletal condition characterized by pain and reduced function in the temporomandibular joint and/or associated masticatory musculature. Prevalence in the United States is 5% and twice as high among women as men. We conducted a discovery genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TMD in 10,153 participants (769 cases, 9,384 controls) of the US Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). The most promising single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested in meta-analysis of 4 independent cohorts. One replication cohort was from the United States, and the others were from Germany, Finland, and Brazil, totaling 1,911 TMD cases and 6,903 controls. A locus near the sarcoglycan alpha ( SGCA), rs4794106, was suggestive in the discovery analysis ( P = 2.6 × 10(6)) and replicated (i.e., 1-tailed P = 0.016) in the Brazilian cohort. In the discovery cohort, sex-stratified analysis identified 2 additional genome-wide significant loci in females. One lying upstream of the relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2 ( RXP2) (chromosome 13, rs60249166, odds ratio [OR] = 0.65, P = 3.6 × 10(-8)) was replicated among females in the meta-analysis (1-tailed P = 0.052). The other (chromosome 17, rs1531554, OR = 0.68, P = 2.9 × 10(-8)) was replicated among females (1-tailed P = 0.002), as well as replicated in meta-analysis of both sexes (1-tailed P = 0.021). A novel locus at genome-wide level of significance (rs73460075, OR = 0.56, P = 3.8 × 10(-8)) in the intron of the dystrophin gene DMD (X chromosome), and a suggestive locus on chromosome 7 (rs73271865, P = 2.9 × 10(-7)) upstream of the Sp4 Transcription Factor ( SP4) gene were identified in the discovery cohort, but neither of these was replicated. The SGCA gene encodes SGCA, which is involved in the cellular structure of muscle fibers and, along with DMD, forms part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Functional annotation suggested that several of these variants reside in loci that regulate processes relevant to TMD pathobiologic processes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28081371 View in PubMed
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The oral health status and treatment needs of adults aged 65+ living independently in Ottawa-Carleton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229519
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 Mar-Apr;81(2):114-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
G D Slade
D. Locker
J L Leake
A S Wu
G. Dunkley
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 Mar-Apr;81(2):114-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Oral Health
Sampling Studies
Stomatognathic Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
We report the findings from a dental survey of a random sample of 299 senior citizens living in Ottawa-Carleton. Those examined were younger, less likely to have a regular dentist, and more likely to have oro-facial pain, difficulty chewing, and to perceive a need to visit a dentist compared with those responding to the enrollment phone interview. Among the 65% of seniors who were dentate, 37% had dental decay; men and seniors with low incomes had more decay (p less than 0.05). Periodontal disease was worse among older seniors, men and poor seniors (p less than 0.05). One third of all seniors reported recent oro-facial pain, 50% had difficulty chewing foods and 30% reported some social impact resulting from their oral health. The resources required to treat the prevalent disorders were considerable and differences between dentate and edentulous people were negligible. Senior citizens expressed attitudes which indicate that they value dental health and would like help to achieve it.
PubMed ID
2331648 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of and factors associated with root decay in older adults in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230882
Source
J Dent Res. 1989 May;68(5):768-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989
Author
D. Locker
G D Slade
J L Leake
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 1989 May;68(5):768-72
Date
May-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dental Caries - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Oral Health
Random Allocation
Risk factors
Tooth Root
Abstract
We collected data on the oral health status and treatment needs of a random sample of persons aged 50 years and over. Data on root decay were obtained from the 183 subjects who were dentate. All remaining teeth were examined for root decay and restorations, whether root surfaces were affected by recession or not. Analysis was undertaken by case and root surface, with separate analyses of decayed (DS), and decayed and filled (DFS) root surfaces. One or more root surfaces with untreated decay were found in 37.2% of subjects, while one or more decayed or filled root surfaces were found in 56.8%. The mean number of decayed surfaces was 1.3 per person, and the mean number of decayed and filled root surfaces was 2.6. Multiple and logistic regression analyses showed that oral health variables were more important predictors of the presence and severity of root decay than demographic, general health, or dental care factors.
PubMed ID
2715468 View in PubMed
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The response rate problem in oral health surveys of older adults in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229131
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 May-Jun;81(3):210-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Locker
G D Slade
J L Leake
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 May-Jun;81(3):210-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bias (epidemiology)
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Participation
Prevalence
Random Allocation
Abstract
We undertook two surveys of older adults in Ontario to estimate the proportion in need of dental treatment. Because we expected low response rates, these studies were designed to assess 1) the effect of response enhancement strategies on participation, and 2) the extent of bias in estimates of treatment needs resulting from less than acceptable response rates. Our response enhancement strategies did not improve response rates substantially. In both surveys, there were significant differences in the characteristics of responders and nonresponders. Nevertheless, there was little difference in crude estimates of the prevalence of treatment needs and adjusted estimates taking account of non-response bias. We conclude that, while high response rates should always be the aim, low response rates do not necessarily compromise the results of descriptive epidemiological studies.
PubMed ID
2361208 View in PubMed
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Variations in the social impact of oral conditions among older adults in South Australia, Ontario, and North Carolina.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211541
Source
J Dent Res. 1996 Jul;75(7):1439-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
G D Slade
A J Spencer
D. Locker
R J Hunt
R P Strauss
J D Beck
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599-7450, USA.
Source
J Dent Res. 1996 Jul;75(7):1439-50
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care for Aged - psychology - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
Mouth Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
North Carolina - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Sampling Studies
Sickness Impact Profile
Social Adjustment
Socioeconomic Factors
South Australia - epidemiology
Statistics, nonparametric
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies among older adults have demonstrated that oral disease frequently leads to dysfunction, discomfort, and disability. This study aimed to assess variations in the social impact of oral conditions among six strata of people aged 65 years and older: residents of metropolitan Adelaide and rural Mt Gambier, South Australia; residents of metropolitan Toronto-North York and non-metropolitan Simcoe-Sudbury counties, Ontario, Canada; and blacks and whites in the Piedmont region of North Carolina (NC), United States. Subjects were participants in three oral epidemiological studies of random samples of the elderly populations in the six strata. Some 1,642 participants completed a 49-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) questionnaire which asked about impacts caused by problems with the teeth, mouth, or dentures during the previous 12 months. The percentage of dentate people reporting impacts fairly often or very often was greatest among NC blacks for 41 of the OHIP items. Two summary variables of social impact were used as dependent variables in bivariate and multivariate least-squares regression analyses. Among dentate people, mean levels of social impact were greatest for NC blacks and lowest for NC whites, while people from South Australia and Ontario had intermediate levels of social impact (P
PubMed ID
8876595 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.