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An incident case-referent study on plasma enterolactone and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18873
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2002 Aug;41(4):168-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Kerstin Hultén
Anna Winkvist
Per Lenner
Robert Johansson
Herman Adlercreutz
Göran Hallmans
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. kerstin.hulten@epiph.umu.se
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2002 Aug;41(4):168-76
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Butyrolactone - analogs & derivatives - blood
Aging
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Lignans - blood
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Using a nested case-referent design, we evaluated the relationship between plasma levels of the lignan enterolactone and the risk of developing breast cancer. METHODS: 248 cases and 492 referents were selected from three population-based cohorts in northern Sweden. Blood samples were donated at enrollment. All blood samples were stored at -80 degrees C. Cases and referents were matched for age, date of blood sample and sampling centre. Breast cancer cases were identified through the regional and national cancer registries. RESULTS: Plasma enterolactone was lower among smokers in all cohorts and in subjects with BMI 28 in one of the cohorts. Low plasma concentrations of enterolactone, below the 12.5(th) percentile (mean plasma enterolactone 2.9 nmol/l), were associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Also, high values of plasma enterolactone, above the 87.5(th) percentile (mean plasma enterolactone 58.2 nmol/l) were significantly associated with an increased breast cancer risk among women from two cohorts with only incident cases and a higher number of pre-menopausal women. High plasma enterolactone concentrations among older women from a mammary screening project with mostly prevalent cases were associated with a non-significant slightly reduced breast cancer risk. CONCLUSION: Very low plasma concentrations of enterolactone were associated with an increased breast cancer risk in all three cohorts. In two of the cohorts, with only incident cases, very high plasma concentrations were also associated with an increased breast cancer risk. In the third cohort with mainly screen-detected cases from a mammary screening program, high plasma enterolactone concentrations were associated with a weak decreased breast cancer risk.
PubMed ID
12242585 View in PubMed
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Antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide and IgA rheumatoid factor predict the development of rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13865
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Oct;48(10):2741-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Solbritt Rantapää-Dahlqvist
Ben A W de Jong
Ewa Berglin
Göran Hallmans
Göran Wadell
Hans Stenlund
Ulf Sundin
Walther J van Venrooij
Author Affiliation
Umeå Universitet, Umea, Sweden. solbritt.rantapaa.dahlqvist@medicin.umu.se
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Oct;48(10):2741-9
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Autoantibodies - blood
Case-Control Studies
Citrulline - immunology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rheumatoid Factor - metabolism
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence and predictive value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies in individuals who subsequently developed rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to determine the relationship to rheumatoid factor (RF) of any isotype. METHODS: A case-control study was nested within the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study and the Maternity cohorts of Northern Sweden. Patients with RA were identified among blood donors whose samples had been taken years before the onset of symptoms. Control subjects matched for age, sex, date of sampling, and residential area were selected randomly from the same cohorts. Anti-CCP antibody and RFs were determined using enzyme immunoassays. RESULTS: Eighty-three individuals with RA were identified as having donated blood before presenting with any symptoms of joint disease (median 2.5 years [interquartile range 1.1-4.7] before RA). In samples obtained before the onset of RA, the prevalence of autoantibodies was 33.7% for anti-CCP, 16.9% for IgG-RF, 19.3% for IgM-RF, and 33.7% for IgA-RF (all highly significant compared with controls). The sensitivities for detecting these autoantibodies >1.5 years and
Notes
Comment In: Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Oct;48(10):2701-514558071
PubMed ID
14558078 View in PubMed
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Association of HLA-DRB1, interleukin-6 and cyclin D1 polymorphisms with cervical cancer in the Swedish population--a candidate gene approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149818
Source
Int J Cancer. 2009 Oct 15;125(8):1851-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2009
Author
Felipe A Castro
Katri Haimila
Inna Sareneva
Markus Schmitt
Justo Lorenzo
Nelli Kunkel
Rajiv Kumar
Asta Försti
Lennart Kjellberg
Göran Hallmans
Matti Lehtinen
Kari Hemminki
Michael Pawlita
Author Affiliation
Division Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2009 Oct 15;125(8):1851-8
Date
Oct-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cervix Uteri - metabolism - pathology
Cyclin D1 - genetics
Female
Genotype
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
HLA-DRB1 Chains
Humans
Interleukin-6 - genetics
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - genetics
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - genetics - virology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection is the major risk factor for cervical cancer (CxCa). The role of genetic susceptibility in the disease has been suggested, but the existing data lack consistency. We conducted a nested case-control study on 973 CxCa cases and 1,763 matched controls, from two Swedish population-based cohorts to examine the association of common genetic variants with CxCa risk. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and 24 other polymorphisms in 14 genes were selected on the basis of reported association or mechanistic plausibility with an HPV infection or cervical cancer development. Genotyping was conducted using multiplex PCR and Luminex technology. A significant association of CxCa with various polymorphisms was observed: rs1800797 in the IL-6 gene (odds ratio [OR] = 0.88, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.79-0.99); rs1041981 in the LTA gene (OR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.78-0.98), and rs9344 in the CCND1 gene (OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.02-1.27), for those individuals carrying the rare allele. Additionally, the alleles 0401 and 1501 of the HLA class II DRB1 locus were associated with an increased risk (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.04-1.45 and OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.11-1.50, respectively), and allele 1301 was associated with decreased risk (OR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.47-0.73). The effects of CCND1 and the HLA*DRB1 alleles were independent of the effect of smoking. We did not find any association of risk with polymorphisms in genes related to the innate immune system. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for genetic susceptibility to CxCa due to variations in genes involved in the immune system and in cell cycle.
PubMed ID
19585495 View in PubMed
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Autoantibodies predate the onset of systemic lupus erythematosus in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136802
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2011;13(1):R30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Catharina Eriksson
Heidi Kokkonen
Martin Johansson
Göran Hallmans
Göran Wadell
Solbritt Rantapää-Dahlqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Immunology, Umeå University, SE-90185 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2011;13(1):R30
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Antinuclear - blood - immunology
Autoantigens - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Early Diagnosis
Female
Humans
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - blood - diagnosis - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Autoantibodies have a central role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The presence of autoantibodies preceding disease onset by years has been reported both in patients with SLE and in those with rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting a gradual development of these diseases. Therefore, we sought to identify autoantibodies in a northern European population predating the onset of symptoms of SLE and their relationship to presenting symptoms.
The register of patients fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria for SLE and with a given date of the onset of symptoms was coanalysed with the register of the Medical Biobank, Ume?, Sweden. Thirty-eight patients were identified as having donated blood samples prior to symptom onset. A nested case-control study (1:4) was performed with 152 age- and sex-matched controls identified from within the Medical Biobank register (Ume?, Sweden). Antibodies against anti-Sj?gren's syndrome antigen A (Ro/SSA; 52 and 60 kDa), anti-Sj?gren's syndrome antigen B, anti-Smith antibody, ribonucleoprotein, scleroderma, anti-histidyl-tRNA synthetase antibody, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), centromere protein B and histones were analysed using the AtheNA Multi-Lyte ANA II Plus Test System on a Bio-Plex Array Reader (Luminex200). Antinuclear antibodies test II (ANA II) results were analysed using indirect immunofluorescence on human epidermal 2 cells at a sample dilution of 1:100.
Autoantibodies against nuclear antigens were detected a mean (?SD) of 5.6 ? 4.7 years before the onset of symptoms and 8.7 ? 5.6 years before diagnosis in 63% of the individuals who subsequently developed SLE. The sensitivity (45.7%) was highest for ANA II, with a specificity of 95%, followed by anti-dsDNA and anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, both with sensitivities of 20.0% at specificities of 98.7% and 97.4%, respectively. The odds ratios (ORs) for predicting disease were 18.13 for anti-dsDNA (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 3.58 to 91.84) and 11.5 (95% CI, 4.54 to 28.87) for ANA. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies appeared first at a mean of 6.6 ? 2.5 years prior to symptom onset. The mean number of autoantibodies in prediseased individuals was 1.4, and after disease onset it was 3.1 (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
21342502 View in PubMed
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Bicycling to Work and Primordial Prevention of Cardiovascular Risk: A Cohort Study Among Swedish Men and Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287961
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Oct 31;5(11)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-31-2016
Author
Anders Grøntved
Robert W Koivula
Ingegerd Johansson
Patrik Wennberg
Lars Østergaard
Göran Hallmans
Frida Renström
Paul W Franks
Source
J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Oct 31;5(11)
Date
Oct-31-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bicycling
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Glucose Intolerance - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Hypertriglyceridemia - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Bicycling to work may be a viable approach for achieving physical activity that provides cardiovascular health benefits. In this study we investigated the relationship of bicycling to work with incidence of obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and impaired glucose tolerance across a decade of follow-up in middle-aged men and women.
We followed 23 732 Swedish men and women with a mean age of 43.5 years at baseline who attended a health examination twice during a 10-year period (1990-2011). In multivariable adjusted models we calculated the odds of incident obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, comparing individuals who commuted to work by bicycle with those who used passive modes of transportation. We also examined the relationship of change in commuting mode with incidence of these clinical risk factors. Cycling to work at baseline was associated with lower odds of incident obesity (odds ratio [OR]=0.85, 95% CI 0.73-0.99), hypertension (OR=0.87, 95% CI 0.79-0.95), hypertriglyceridemia (OR=0.85, 95% CI 0.76-0.94), and impaired glucose tolerance (OR=0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.96) compared with passive travel after adjusting for putative confounding factors. Participants who maintained or began bicycling to work during follow-up had lower odds of obesity (OR=0.61, 95% CI 0.50-0.73), hypertension (OR=0.89, 95% CI 0.80-0.98), hypertriglyceridemia (OR=0.80, 95% CI 0.70-0.90), and impaired glucose tolerance (OR=0.82, 95% CI 0.74-0.91) compared with participants not cycling to work at both times points or who switched from cycling to other modes of transport during follow-up.
These data suggest that commuting by bicycle to work is an important strategy for primordial prevention of clinical cardiovascular risk factors among middle-aged men and women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27799235 View in PubMed
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Bilirubin and UGT1A1*28 are not associated with lower risk for ischemic stroke in a prospective nested case-referent setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140054
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2010;30(6):590-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kim Ekblom
Stefan L Marklund
Lars Johansson
Pia Osterman
Göran Hallmans
Lars Weinehall
Per-Gunnar Wiklund
Johan Hultdin
Author Affiliation
Clinical Chemistry, Department of Medical Biosciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. kim.ekblom@medbio.umu.se
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2010;30(6):590-6
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bilirubin - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Brain Ischemia - blood - enzymology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Glucuronosyltransferase - genetics
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - blood - enzymology - genetics
Sweden
Abstract
Bilirubin, an antioxidant, has been associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk. A major cause of elevated plasma bilirubin is the common UGT1A1*28 promoter polymorphism in the gene of the bilirubin-conjugating enzyme UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1, which reduces transcription by 70%. Earlier studies reporting a protective effect of bilirubin on stroke have not included analysis of UGT1A1*28. The purpose of this study is to investigate if bilirubin and UGT1A1*28 are protective against ischemic stroke in a prospective case-referent setting.
Cases with first-ever ischemic stroke (n = 231; median lag time 4.9 years) and 462 matched referents from the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study Cohort were included. Plasma bilirubin was measured and UGT1A1*28 was analyzed by fragment analysis.
Plasma bilirubin was lower in cases than in referents, but the difference reached significance only for women. The UGT1A1*28 polymorphism (allele frequency 30%) showed a strong gene-dose relationship with bilirubin levels both among cases and referents, but was not associated with risk for stroke. Among multiple other variables analyzed, the strongest correlation with bilirubin was found for plasma iron.
There was no evidence for a protective effect of the UGT1A1*28 polymorphism against stroke and consequently neither for bilirubin. The findings suggest that other factors influencing the risk for stroke might also affect bilirubin levels.
PubMed ID
20948202 View in PubMed
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Biomarkers of milk fat and the risk of myocardial infarction in men and women: a prospective, matched case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96924
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jul;92(1):194-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Eva Warensjö
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Tommy Cederholm
Kurt Boman
Mats Eliasson
Göran Hallmans
Ingegerd Johansson
Per Sjögren
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. eva.warensjo@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jul;92(1):194-202
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood pressure
Cohort Studies
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - adverse effects
Models, Statistical
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Patient Selection
Phospholipids - blood - pharmacology
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: High intakes of saturated fat have been associated with cardiovascular disease, and milk fat is rich in saturated fat. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the serum milk fat biomarkers pentadecanoic acid (15:0), heptadecanoic acid (17:0), and their sum (15:0+17:0) and a first myocardial infarction (MI). DESIGN: The study design was a prospective case-control study nested within a large population-based cohort in Sweden. Included in the study were 444 cases (307 men) and 556 controls (308 men) matched on sex, age, date of examination, and geographic region. Clinical, anthropometric, biomarker fatty acid, physical activity, and dietary data were collected. The odds of a first MI were investigated by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: In women, proportions of milk fat biomarkers in plasma phospholipids were significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
20484449 View in PubMed
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Blood glucose and risk of incident and fatal cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project (me-can): analysis of six prospective cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98549
Source
PLoS Med. 2009 Dec;6(12):e1000201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Tanja Stocks
Kilian Rapp
Tone Bjørge
Jonas Manjer
Hanno Ulmer
Randi Selmer
Annekatrin Lukanova
Dorthe Johansen
Hans Concin
Steinar Tretli
Göran Hallmans
Håkan Jonsson
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. tanja.stocks@urologi.umu.se
Source
PLoS Med. 2009 Dec;6(12):e1000201
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Prospective studies have indicated that elevated blood glucose levels may be linked with increased cancer risk, but the strength of the association is unclear. We examined the association between blood glucose and cancer risk in a prospective study of six European cohorts. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can) includes cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden; the current study included 274,126 men and 275,818 women. Mean age at baseline was 44.8 years and mean follow-up time was 10.4 years. Excluding the first year of follow-up, 18,621 men and 11,664 women were diagnosed with cancer, and 6,973 men and 3,088 women died of cancer. We used Cox regression models to calculate relative risk (RR) for glucose levels, and included adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and smoking status in the analyses. RRs were corrected for regression dilution ratio of glucose. RR (95% confidence interval) per 1 mmol/l increment of glucose for overall incident cancer was 1.05 (1.01-1.10) in men and 1.11 (1.05-1.16) in women, and corresponding RRs for fatal cancer were 1.15 (1.07-1.22) and 1.21 (1.11-1.33), respectively. Significant increases in risk among men were found for incident and fatal cancer of the liver, gallbladder, and respiratory tract, for incident thyroid cancer and multiple myeloma, and for fatal rectal cancer. In women, significant associations were found for incident and fatal cancer of the pancreas, for incident urinary bladder cancer, and for fatal cancer of the uterine corpus, cervix uteri, and stomach. CONCLUSIONS: Data from our study indicate that abnormal glucose metabolism, independent of BMI, is associated with an increased risk of cancer overall and at several cancer sites. Our data showed stronger associations among women than among men, and for fatal cancer compared to incident cancer. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.
PubMed ID
20027213 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure and other metabolic syndrome factors and risk of brain tumour in the large population-based Me-Can cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128682
Source
J Hypertens. 2012 Feb;30(2):290-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Michael Edlinger
Susanne Strohmaier
Håkan Jonsson
Tone Bjørge
Jonas Manjer
Wegene T Borena
Christel Häggström
Anders Engeland
Steinar Tretli
Hans Concin
Gabriele Nagel
Randi Selmer
Dorthe Johansen
Tanja Stocks
Göran Hallmans
Pär Stattin
Hanno Ulmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
Source
J Hypertens. 2012 Feb;30(2):290-6
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Austria - epidemiology
Blood pressure
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Brain tumour has few established determinants. We assessed to which extent risk of brain tumour was related to metabolic syndrome factors in adults.
In the Me-Can project, 580?000 individuals from Sweden, Austria, and Norway were followed for a median of 10 years after baseline measurement. Data on brain tumours were obtained from national cancer registries. The factors of metabolic syndrome (BMI, SBP and DBP, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides), separately and combined, were analysed in quintiles and for transformed z-scores (mean transformed to 0 and standard deviation to 1). Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression models were used, with corrections for measurement error.
During follow-up, 1312 primary brain tumours were diagnosed, predominantly meningioma (n?=?348) and high-grade glioma (n?=?436). For meningioma, the hazard ratio was increased for z-scores of SBP [hazard ratio?=?1.27 per unit standard deviation, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.57], of DBP (hazard ratio?=?1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.58), and of the combined metabolic syndrome score (hazard ratio?=?1.31, 95% CI 1.11-1.54). An increased risk of high-grade glioma was found for DBP (hazard ratio?=?1.23, 95% CI 1.01-1.50) and triglycerides (hazard ratio?=?1.35, 95% CI 1.05-1.72). For both meningioma and high-grade glioma, the risk was more than double in the fifth quintiles of DBP compared to the lowest quintile. For meningioma this risk was even larger for SBP.
Increased blood pressure was associated with risk of brain tumours, especially of meningiomas.
PubMed ID
22179083 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure and risk of cancer incidence and mortality in the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126806
Source
Hypertension. 2012 Apr;59(4):802-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Tanja Stocks
Mieke Van Hemelrijck
Jonas Manjer
Tone Bjørge
Hanno Ulmer
Göran Hallmans
Björn Lindkvist
Randi Selmer
Gabriele Nagel
Steinar Tretli
Hans Concin
Anders Engeland
Håkan Jonsson
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. tanja.stocks@urologi.umu.se
Source
Hypertension. 2012 Apr;59(4):802-10
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Austria - epidemiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Characteristics
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Observational studies have shown inconsistent results for the association between blood pressure and cancer risk. We investigated the association in 7 cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden. In total, 577799 adults with a mean age of 44 years were followed for, on average, 12 years. Incident cancers were 22184 in men and 14744 in women, and cancer deaths were 8724 and 4525, respectively. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios of cancer per 10-mmHg increments of midblood pressure, which corresponded with 0.7 SDs and, for example, an increment of systolic/diastolic blood pressure of 130/80 to 142/88 mmHg. All of the models used age as the time scale and were adjusted for possible confounders, including body mass index and smoking status. In men, midblood pressure was positively related to total incident cancer (hazard ratio per 10 mmHg increment: 1.07 [95% CI: 1.04-1.09]) and to cancer of the oropharynx, colon, rectum, lung, bladder, kidney, malignant melanoma, and nonmelanoma skin cancer. In women, midblood pressure was not related to total incident cancer but was positively related to cancer of the liver, pancreas, cervix, uterine corpus, and malignant melanoma. A positive association was also found for cancer mortality, with HRs per 10-mmHg increment of 1.12 (95% CI: 1.08-1.15) for men and 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02-1.11) for women. These results suggest a small increased cancer risk overall in men with elevated blood pressure level and a higher risk for cancer death in men and women.
PubMed ID
22353615 View in PubMed
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