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Changes in food choice during a successful weight loss trial in overweight and obese postpartum women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264667
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 Dec;22(12):2517-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Ena Huseinovic
Anna Winkvist
Fredrik Bertz
Hilde Kristin Brekke
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 Dec;22(12):2517-23
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet Records
Diet Therapy
Exercise - physiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Food Preferences - physiology - psychology
Humans
Lactation - physiology - psychology
Linear Models
Obesity - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Overweight - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Postpartum Period - physiology - psychology
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss - physiology
Weight Reduction Programs
Abstract
To examine changes in intake across food groups during a weight loss trial that produced significant and sustainable weight loss in lactating women receiving dietary treatment.
At 10-14 wk postpartum, 61 overweight and obese lactating Swedish women were randomized to a 12-wk dietary (D), exercise (E), combined (DE), or control (C) treatment. Food intake was assessed by 4-d weighed diet records which were used to examine changes in intake across seven food groups from baseline to 12 wk and 1 y after randomization. Differences in changes in food choice between women receiving dietary treatment (D+DE) and no dietary treatment (E+C) were examined using multivariate linear regression.
At baseline, sweets and salty snacks contributed to 21±10 percent of total energy intake (E%). During the intervention period, women receiving dietary treatment reduced their E% from sweets and salty snacks and caloric drinks and increased their E% from vegetables more than did women not receiving dietary treatment (all P?
PubMed ID
25234605 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness and quality of life of a diet intervention postpartum: 2-year results from a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298420
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Jan 08; 19(1):38
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Jan-08-2019
Author
Lars Hagberg
Anna Winkvist
Hilde K Brekke
Fredrik Bertz
Else Hellebö Johansson
Ena Huseinovic
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Care Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Jan 08; 19(1):38
Date
Jan-08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Obesity - diet therapy
Postpartum Period
Primary Health Care
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Weight Reduction Programs - economics
Abstract
Pregnancy has been identified as a contributor to obesity. We have shown that a diet intervention postpartum produced a 2-y weight loss of 8%. Here, we present the impact of the diet intervention on cost-effectiveness and explore changes in quality of life (QOL).
A total of 110 postpartum women with overweight/obesity were randomly assigned to diet (D-group) or control (C-group). D-group received a 12-wk diet intervention within primary health care followed by monthly emails up to the 1-y follow-up. C-group received a brochure. Changes in QOL were measured using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey and EQ-5D. The analysis of cost-effectiveness was a cost-utility analysis with a health care perspective and included costs of intervention for stakeholder, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained and savings in health care. The likelihood of cost-effectiveness was examined using the net monetary benefit method.
The D-group increased their QOL more than the C-group at 12 wk. and 1 y, with pronounced differences for the dimensions general health and mental health, and the mental component summary score (all p?
PubMed ID
30621673 View in PubMed
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Cost-utility analysis of a randomized controlled weight loss trial among lactating overweight/obese women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265831
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lars A Hagberg
Hilde K Brekke
Fredrik Bertz
Anna Winkvist
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:38
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Lactation - physiology
Obesity - diet therapy
Postpartum Period
Quality of Life
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Sweden
Weight Reduction Programs - economics - methods
Abstract
Overweight and obesity among young, adult women are increasing problems in Sweden as in many other countries. The postpartum period may be a good opportunity to improve eating habits and lose weight in a sustainable manner. The aim was to make a cost-utility analysis of a dietary behavior modification treatment alongside usual care, compared to usual care alone, among lactating overweight and obese women.
This study was a cost-utility analysis based on a randomized controlled and longitudinal clinical diet intervention. Between 2007-2010, 68 women living in Sweden were, after baseline measurement at 8-12 weeks postpartum, randomly assigned to a 12-week dietary behavior modification treatment or control group. Inclusion criteria were: self-reported pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) 25-35 kg/m2, non-smoker, singleton term delivery, birth weight?>?2500 g, intention to breastfeed for 6 mo and no diseases (mother and child). The women in the intervention group received 1.5 hour of individual counseling at study start and 1 hour at follow-up home visits after 6 weeks of intervention, with support through cell phone text messages every two wk. Dietary intervention aimed to reduce dietary intake by 500 kcal/day. The control group received usual care. Weight results have previously been reported. Here we report on analyses carried out during 2012-2013 of cost per quality adjusted life years (QALY), based on the changes in quality of life measured by EQ-5D-3 L and SF-6D. Likelihood of cost-effectiveness was calculated using Net Monetary Benefit method.
Based on conservative assumptions of no remaining effect after 1 year follow-up, the diet intervention was cost-effective. Costs per gained QALY were 8 643 - 9 758 USD. The likelihood for cost-effectiveness, considering a willingness to pay 50 000 USD for a QALY, was 87-93%.
The diet intervention is cost-effective.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01343238 Registered April 27, 2011.The regional ethics committee in Gothenburg, Sweden, approved the study on November 15, 2006.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24428802 View in PubMed
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Diet and exercise weight-loss trial in lactating overweight and obese women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120952
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Oct;96(4):698-705
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Fredrik Bertz
Hilde K Brekke
Lars Ellegård
Kathleen M Rasmussen
Margareta Wennergren
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. fredrik.bertz@nutrition.gu.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Oct;96(4):698-705
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior Therapy
Body Composition
Body mass index
Diet Records
Diet, Reducing
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lactation
Obesity - diet therapy - prevention & control - therapy
Overweight - diet therapy - prevention & control - therapy
Patient Dropouts
Patient Education as Topic
Recurrence - prevention & control
Sweden
Walking
Weight Loss
Abstract
Current evidence suggests a combined treatment of postpartum weight loss of diet and exercise. However, to our knowledge, neither their separate and interactive effects nor long-term outcomes have been evaluated.
We evaluated whether a 12-wk dietary behavior modification (D) treatment to decrease energy intake, physical exercise behavior modification (E) treatment to implement moderate aerobic exercise, or combined dietary and physical exercise behavior modification (DE) treatment compared with control (usual care) (C) reduces body weight in lactating women measured at the end of treatment and at a 1-y follow-up 9 mo after treatment termination.
At 10-14 wk postpartum, 68 lactating Swedish women with a prepregnancy BMI (in kg/m²) of 25-35 were randomly assigned to D, E, DE, or C groups. Measurements were made at baseline, after the intervention, and again at a 1-y follow-up 9 mo later. A 2 × 2 factorial approach was used to analyze main and interaction effects of treatments.
Weight changes after the intervention and 1-y follow-up were -8.3 ± 4.2 and -10.2 ± 5.7 kg, respectively, in the D group; -2.4 ± 3.2 and -2.7 ± 5.9 kg, respectively, in the E group; -6.9 ± 3.0 and -7.3 ± 6.3 kg, respectively, in the DE group; and -0.8 ± 3.0 and -0.9 ± 6.6 kg, respectively, in the C group. The main effects of D treatment, but not of E treatment, on weight were significant at both times (P
PubMed ID
22952179 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of a weight loss intervention in postpartum women: results from a randomized controlled trial in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283034
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Aug;104(2):362-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Ena Huseinovic
Fredrik Bertz
Monica Leu Agelii
Else Hellebö Johansson
Anna Winkvist
Hilde Kristin Brekke
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Aug;104(2):362-70
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior Therapy
Body Composition
Body mass index
Body Weight Maintenance
Breast Feeding
Diet, Reducing
Female
Humans
Obesity - diet therapy
Overweight
Patient Dropouts
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Sweden
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Abstract
Reproduction has been identified as an important factor for long-term weight gain among women. A previous efficacy trial has successfully produced postpartum weight loss; however, the effectiveness of this intervention needs to be established.
This study was designed to evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of a diet behavior modification treatment to produce weight loss in postpartum women within the primary health care setting in Sweden.
During 2011-2014, 110 women with a self-reported body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) of =27 at 6-15 wk postpartum were randomly assigned to the diet behavior modification group (D group) or the control group (C group). Women randomly assigned to the D group (n = 54) received a structured 12-wk diet behavior modification treatment by a dietitian and were instructed to gradually implement a diet plan based on the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations and to self-weigh =3 times/wk. Women randomly assigned to the C group (n = 56) were given a brochure on healthy eating. The primary outcome was change in body weight after 12 wk and 1 y. The retention rate was 91% and 85% at 12 wk and 1 y, respectively.
At baseline, women had a median (1st, 3rd quartile) BMI of 31.0 (28.8, 33.6), and 84% were breastfeeding. After 12 wk, median weight change in the D group was -6.1 kg (-8.4, -3.2 kg) compared with -1.6 kg (-3.5, -0.4 kg) in the C group (P
PubMed ID
27413127 View in PubMed
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Transformative Lifestyle Change: key to sustainable weight loss among women in a post-partum diet and exercise intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275110
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2015 Oct;11(4):631-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Fredrik Bertz
Carina Sparud-Lundin
Anna Winkvist
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2015 Oct;11(4):631-45
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Diet, Reducing - methods
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Life Style
Overweight - therapy
Postpartum Period
Program Evaluation
Sweden
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Weight Loss
Abstract
The increase in overweight and obesity among women is a growing concern, and reproduction is associated with persistent weight gain. We have shown that dietary behavioural modification treatment, with or without exercise, results in weight loss and maintenance of weight loss. The aim of this study was to provide an explanatory model of how overweight and obese women achieve weight loss during, and after, participating in a post-partum diet and/or exercise intervention. Using Grounded Theory, we performed and analysed 29 interviews with 21 women in a 12-week Swedish post-partum lifestyle intervention with a 9-month follow-up. Interviews were made after the intervention and at the 9-month follow-up. To overcome initial barriers to weight loss, the women needed a 'Catalytic Interaction' (CI) from the care provider. It depended on individualised, concrete, specific and useful information, and an emotional bond through joint commitment, trust and accountability. Weight loss was underpinned by gradual introduction of conventional health behaviours. However, the implementation depended on the experience of the core category process 'Transformative Lifestyle Change' (TLC). This developed through a transformative process of reciprocal changes in cognitions, emotions, body, environment, behaviours and perceived self. Women accomplishing the stages of the TLC process were successful in weight loss, in contrast to those who did not. The TLC process, dependent on initiation through CI, led to implementation and integration of recognised health behaviours, resulting in sustainable weight loss. The TLC model, including the CI construct and definition of barriers, facilitators and strategies provides an explanatory model of this process.
PubMed ID
24750689 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.