Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Development of a French-Canadian version of the Life-Space Assessment (LSA-F): content validity, reliability and applicability for power mobility device users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152950
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2009 Jan;4(1):31-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Claudine Auger
Louise Demers
Isabelle Gélinas
François Routhier
Jeffrey Jutai
Chantal Guérette
Frank Deruyter
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada. claudine.auger@umontreal.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2009 Jan;4(1):31-41
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self-Help Devices
Translating
Abstract
To examine the measurement properties of the French-Canadian version of the Life-Space Assessment questionnaire (LSA-F) for power mobility device (PMD) users.
Content validity, test-retest reliability of telephone interviews (2-week interval) and applicability were examined with PMD users presenting neurological, orthopedic or medically complex conditions. Translation/back-translation from English to French and cultural adaptation was performed and pretested with five bilingual users. Test-retest reliability was examined with 40 French-speaking users, age 50 and over, who had been using a subsidized PMD for 2-15 months. Audio-taped interviews were coded to judge content validity and applicability.
Content validity results confirmed equivalent meaning for most questions. The test-retest reliability was excellent for the composite score (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.87) and revealed moderate to substantial concordance for 18/20 items (k = 0.47-0.73; P(a) > 57.5%). The applicability of the LSA-F is satisfactory considering an acceptable burden of assessment, low refusal of the telephone interview format (8%; n = 4), reasonable administration time (9.2 +/- 3.9 min) and a normally distributed composite score.
The LSA-F is a valid measure with regards to its content, stable over a period of 2 weeks and applicable for a population of middle-aged and older French-Canadian speaking adults who use PMDs.
PubMed ID
19172479 View in PubMed
Less detail

Efficacy and retention of the French-Canadian version of the wheelchair skills training program for manual wheelchair users: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125297
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 Jun;93(6):940-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
François Routhier
R Lee Kirby
Louise Demers
Malgorzata Depa
Kara Thompson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation and Social Integration, Institut de réadaptation en déficience physique de Québec, Québec City, Québec, Canada. Francois.Routhier@rea.ulaval.ca
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 Jun;93(6):940-8
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Skills - physiology
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Patient Safety
Physical Therapy Modalities
Program Evaluation
Quality Control
Quebec
Reference Values
Retention (Psychology) - physiology
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Single-Blind Method
Statistics, nonparametric
Task Performance and Analysis
Wheelchairs - psychology - utilization
Abstract
To test the hypotheses that, in comparison with a control group that received standard care, users of manual wheelchairs who also received the French-Canadian version of the Wheelchair Skills Training Program (WSTP) would significantly improve their wheelchair-skills capacity and that these improvements would be retained at 3 months.
Multicenter, single-blind, randomized controlled trial.
Three rehabilitation centers in Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Manual wheelchair users (N=39), a sample of convenience.
Participants were randomly allocated to the WSTP or control groups. Participants in both groups received standard care. Participants in the WSTP group also received a mean of 5.9 training sessions (a mean total duration of 5h and 36min).
The French-Canadian version of the Wheelchair Skills Test (WST) (Version 3.2) was administered at evaluation at first time period (baseline) (t1), evaluation at second time period (posttraining) (t2) (a mean of 47d after t1), and at evaluation at third time period (follow-up) (t3) (a mean of 101d after t2).
At t2, the mean ± SD total percentage WST capacity scores were 77.4%±13.8% for the WSTP group and 69.8%±18.4% for the control group (P=.030). Most of this difference was due to the community-level skills (P=.002). The total and subtotal Wheelchair Skills Test scores at t3 decreased by =0.5% from the t2 values, but differences between groups at t3, adjusting for t1, did not reach statistical significance (P=.017 at a Bonferroni-adjusted a level of .005).
WSTP training improves wheelchair skills immediately after training, particularly at the community-skills level, but this study did not show statistically significant differences between the groups at 3 months.
Notes
Cites: J Rehabil Res Dev. 2009;46(5):567-7619882491
Cites: Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2009 Jan;88(1):47-5618971766
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2010 Jan;92(1):23-3020048092
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Jun 1;152(11):726-3220335313
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2010 Aug;91(8):1166-7320684896
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2010 Oct;24(10):867-8620554638
Cites: PM R. 2010 Oct;2(10):920-520970761
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2011 May;25(5):416-2421059666
Cites: Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2012;7(1):37-4421446791
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2010 Nov;91(11):1752-721044722
Cites: Percept Mot Skills. 2001 Aug;93(1):131-811693676
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 Jan;92(1):4811772759
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2002 Jan;83(1):10-811782826
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2002 Sep;83(9):1295-912235611
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2003 Jul;17(4):418-3012785251
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2004 Jan;85(1):41-5014970966
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2004 Mar;85(3):416-2315031827
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2004 May;85(5):794-80415129405
Cites: Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 1990 Aug;69(4):184-902383378
Cites: Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 1994 Sep-Oct;73(5):319-307917161
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Oct;53(10):1712-2016181170
Cites: J Rehabil Res Dev. 2005 May-Jun;42(3 Suppl 1):65-7316195964
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2005 Dec;86(12):2316-2316344029
Cites: Inj Prev. 2006 Feb;12(1):8-1116461412
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2007 Jun 15-30;29(11-12):935-4817577728
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2009 Dec;90(12):2034-819969165
PubMed ID
22494946 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Evaluation of a wheelchair recycling program].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186398
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2003 Feb;70(1):21-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Claude Vincent
François Routhier
Chantal Guérette
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Faculté de médecine Département de réadaptation Pavillon Ferdinand-Vandry Québec, Qc. G1K 7P4. claude.vincent@rea.ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2003 Feb;70(1):21-32
Date
Feb-2003
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Equipment Reuse
Humans
Program Evaluation
Wheelchairs - supply & distribution
Abstract
In 1998, 11.8% of the Quebec population over 15 years showed mobility problems and 2.3% of that group revealed that their needs were not met. The same year, the Régie de l'assurance-maladie du Québec distributed more than 4,500 wheelchairs and repaired some 30,000 others, at a cost of over $20 million. The recycling of wheelchairs is seen as a solution for improving this situation. This paper presents an evaluation of a wheelchair recycling program.
Three groups of participants involved in the recycling of wheelchairs contributed to the gathering of information. These were: personnel (n = 9), occupational therapists in the community (n = 5) and users of refurbished wheelchairs (n = 20).
A participative and qualitative research approach was conducted with the 1st group. The results outline the inefficacy of the process on the structural level (e.g. not enough resources to collect unused wheelchairs), operational level (e.g. absence of norms to recycle), strategic level (e.g. absence of policy to encourage people to give back their unused wheelchair) and systemic level (e.g. the state is not imputable). A quantitative approach with the 2nd and 3rd groups revealed high satisfaction with regard to the efficacy, appearance, safety, durability and comfort as well as the delivery and follow-up services rendered.
The evaluation procedure herein proposed can be customized to fit other contexts and provides policy-makers with quick access to field data to help them choose the appropriate course of action.
PubMed ID
12619396 View in PubMed
Less detail

Examination of new environmental control applications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182579
Source
Assist Technol. 2002;14(2):98-111
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Claude Vincent
Gilbert Drouin
François Routhier
Author Affiliation
Dept of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Sainte-Foy, Québec, Canada.
Source
Assist Technol. 2002;14(2):98-111
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Environment, Controlled
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Quebec
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the application of new Environmental Control Systems (ECSs) in the homes of users and caregivers. The research questions were: (1) Can new ECS applications improve the activities of daily living (ADL) of people with significant functional limitations who require personal assistance? (2) Can new ECS applications replace home services and lessen caregiver burden? To answer these questions, user satisfaction regarding ECS applications, impact on ADL, technical performance, and caregiver burden were examined. This collaborative investigation involving a local community health care center, a telephone monitoring service, an industrial partner, and a university research team used a case study approach. Five users with moderate cognitive problems or significant functional limitations who required personal assistance were chosen, along with their caregivers, for a 3-month in-home trial to test new ECS alternatives. The ECS in the study featured remote control functions (e.g., door lock release, outside intercom), specific verbal reminders (e.g., reminders to turn off stove elements), and automatic functions (e.g., night-lights in the bathroom and hallway). Information was collected in the users' homes with three standardized questionnaires and a company-designed questionnaire. The overall technical performance of the ECS was found to be in most cases moderately efficient. Participant satisfaction revealed that ECS alternatives needed improvement with respect to the service aspects such as follow-up services and repair/servicing. Caregiver burden was lessened for psychological aspects but not for physical tasks. Users seemed to have a positive perception of the impact of the ECS on many of their ADL. We learned six lessons from this 15-month case study, namely: (1) the use of remote control by people with moderate cognitive impairments was difficult; (2) verbal reminders were greatly appreciated; (3) the automatic ECS applications needed more adjustment; (4) reactions varied depending on the participant's perspective; (5) other assessment tools might have been better suited to mild cognitive problems; and (6) removal of a beneficial product at the conclusion of the evaluation phase raised ethical considerations.
PubMed ID
14651248 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reliability and validity of the French-Canadian Late Life Function and Disability Instrument in community-living wheelchair-users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112880
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2013 Sep;20(5):365-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Brodie M Sakakibara
François Routhier
Marie-Pier Lavoie
William C Miller
Author Affiliation
Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2013 Sep;20(5):365-73
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Independent living
Language
Lower Extremity - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Social Participation
Upper Extremity - physiology
Wheelchairs
Abstract
To examine the test-retest reliability, standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change, construct validity, and ceiling and floor effects in the French-Canadian Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI-F).
The LLFDI-F is a measure of activity (i.e. physical functioning of upper and lower extremities), and participation (i.e. frequency of and limitations with). The measure was administered over the telephone to a sample of community-living wheelchair-users, who were 50 years of age and older, in this 10-day retest methodological study. The sample (n = 40) was mostly male (70%), had a mean age of 62.2 years, and mean experience with using a wheelchair of 20.2 years. Sixty-five percent used a manual wheelchair.
The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,1) for the participation component ranged from 0.68 to 0.90 and from 0.74 to 0.97 for the activity component. Minimal detectable changes ranged from 7.18 to 22.56 in the participation component and from 4.71 to 16.19 in the activity component. Mann-Whitney U-tests revealed significant differences between manual and power wheelchair-users in the personal and instrumental role domains, and all areas in the activity component.
There is support for the test-retest reliability and construct validity of the LLFDI-F in community-living wheelchair-users, 50 years of age and older. However, because the majority of items in the lower-extremity domains of the activity component do not account for assistive device use, they are not recommended for use with individuals who have little or no use of their lower-extremities.
Notes
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2002 Apr;57(4):M209-1611909885
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2002 Apr;57(4):M217-2211909886
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2003 Sep;51(9):1244-5112919236
Cites: Stroke. 2004 Jun;35(6):1404-915105515
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2004 Mar 18;26(6):362-7015204488
Cites: Health Rep. 2004 May;15(3):37-4115208888
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004 Sep;52(9):1554-915341561
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2000 Mar;176:249-5210755072
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2008 Jun;89(6):1177-8618503817
Cites: Taehan Kanho Hakhoe Chi. 2008 Jun;38(3):437-4418604153
Cites: BMJ. 2008;337:a144518845605
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Feb;57(2):309-1419170787
Cites: Assist Technol. 2010 Spring;22(1):3-17; quiz 1920402043
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2010 Oct;58 Suppl 2:S308-1221029059
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 May;59(5):893-921568958
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(23-24):2208-1621446857
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2011 Nov;92(11):1785-821762872
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2011 Nov;63 Suppl 11:S308-2422588753
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1310-522702515
Cites: Can J Aging. 2005 Summer;24(2):191-816082621
Cites: Can J Occup Ther. 2006 Feb;73(1):18-2516570838
Cites: J Rehabil Res Dev. 2007;44(5):685-9117943680
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2000 Dec 15;25(24):3186-9111124735
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2000 Dec;81(12 Suppl 2):S15-2011128900
PubMed ID
23786550 View in PubMed
Less detail