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Foreigners and the right to justice in the aftermath of 9/11.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177244
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2004 Nov-Dec;27(6):609-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
François Crépeau
Estibalitz Jimenez
Author Affiliation
Centre for International Studies and Research (CERIUM), University of Montreal, Canada. francois.crepeau@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2004 Nov-Dec;27(6):609-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Civil Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Emigration and Immigration - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Security Measures - legislation & jurisprudence
September 11 Terrorist Attacks - psychology
Social Control, Formal
Social Justice
Time Factors
PubMed ID
15560885 View in PubMed
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Health care access for refugees and immigrants with precarious status: public health and human right challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155345
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;99(4):290-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cécile Rousseau
Sonia ter Kuile
Marie Munoz
Lucie Nadeau
Marie-Jo Ouimet
Laurence Kirmayer
François Crépeau
Author Affiliation
Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC. cecile.rousseau@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Jul-Aug;99(4):290-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Ethics, Medical
Health Services Accessibility - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Human Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Quebec
Refugees - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Migration flux is being transformed by globalization, and the number of people with either undocumented or with a precarious status is growing in Canada. There are no epidemiological data on the health and social consequences of this situation, but clinicians working in primary care with migrants and refugees are increasingly worried about the associated morbidity. This commentary summarizes findings from a pilot study with health professionals in the Montreal area and suggests that the uninsured population predicament is a national problem. Although ethical and legal issues associated with data collection by clinicians, institutions and governments need to be examined, estimating the public health consequences and long-term cost associated with problems in access to health care due to migratory status should be a priority. Current regulations and administrative policies appear to be at odds with the principles of equal rights set out by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Beyond the commitment of individual clinicians, Canadian medical associations should take an advocacy role and scrutinize the ethical and medical implications of the present system.
PubMed ID
18767273 View in PubMed
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Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women: the paradox between values and attitudes of health care professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126329
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Mónica Ruiz-Casares
Cécile Rousseau
Audrey Laurin-Lamothe
Joanna Anneke Rummens
Phyllis Zelkowitz
François Crépeau
Nicolas Steinmetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. monica.ruizcasares@mcgill.ca
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Child
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women confronts human rights and professional values with political and institutional regulations that limit services. In order to understand how health care professionals deal with these diverging mandates, we assessed their attitudes toward providing care to this population. Clinicians, administrators, and support staff (n = 1,048) in hospitals and primary care centers of a large multiethnic city responded to an online survey about attitudes toward access to health care services. Analysis examined the role of personal and institutional correlates of these attitudes. Foreign-born respondents and those in primary care centers were more likely to assess the present access to care as a serious problem, and to endorse broad or full access to services, primarily based on human rights reasons. Clinicians were more likely than support staff to endorse full or broad access to health care services. Respondents who approved of restricted or no access also endorsed health as a basic human right (61.1%) and child development as a priority (68.6%). A wide gap separates attitudes toward entitlement to health care and the endorsement of principles stemming from human rights and the best interest of the child. Case-based discussions with professionals facing value dilemmas and training on children's rights are needed to promote equitable practices and advocacy against regulations limiting services.
PubMed ID
22399247 View in PubMed
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