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Accreditation: a cultural control strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156493
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2008;21(2):146-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
André Paccioni
Claude Sicotte
François Champagne
Author Affiliation
Centre of Interdisciplinary Research on Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal, Quebec, Canada. andre.paccioni@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2008;21(2):146-58
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Humans
Leadership
Longitudinal Studies
Organizational Culture
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Quebec
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to describe and understand the effects of the accreditation process on organizational control and quality management practices in two Quebec primary-care health organizations.
A multiple-case longitudinal study was conducted taking a mixed qualitative/quantitative approach. An analytical model was developed of the effects of the accreditation process on the type of organizational control exercised and the quality management practices implemented. The data were collected through group interviews, semi-directed interviews of key informers, non-participant observations, a review of the literature, and structured questionnaires distributed to all the employees working in both institutions.
The accreditation process has fostered the implementation of consultation mechanisms in self-assessment teams. Improving assessments of client satisfaction was identified as a prime objective but, in terms of the values promoted in organizations, accreditation has little effect on the perceptions of employees not directly involved in the process. As long as not all staff members have integrated the basis for accreditation and its outcomes, the accreditation process appears to remain an external, bureaucratic control instrument.
This study provides a theoretical model for understanding organizational changes brought about by accreditation of primary services. Through self-assessment of professional values and standards, accreditation may foster better quality management practices.
PubMed ID
18578200 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the nursing role in the care of patients with neuromuscular disorders].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137581
Source
Can J Neurosci Nurs. 2010;32(4):22-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Cynthia Gagnon
Maud-Christine Chouinard
Melissa Lavoie
François Champagne
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé de l'Université de Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada. Cynthia.Gagnon4@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Can J Neurosci Nurs. 2010;32(4):22-9
Date
2010
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Humans
Models, Nursing
Myotonic Dystrophy - nursing
Neuromuscular Diseases - nursing - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Theory
Patient Education as Topic
Quebec
Social Support
Abstract
The nursing role in neuromuscular disorders has been shown as a promising solution in service organization. However, the role of neuromuscular nurses has scarcely been addressed in the literature. The present evaluation process was geared toward defining nursing role in relation to systematic follow-up of neuromuscular disorders and to assess its theoretical background.
PubMed ID
21268911 View in PubMed
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[A tool to evaluate hospital nursing practices toward smoking cessation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113919
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2013 Mar;(112):36-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Mario Lepage
François Champagne
Lise Renaud
Author Affiliation
Université du Québec en Outaouais, Département des sciences infirmières, Gatineau, Canada. mario.lepage@uqo.ca
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2013 Mar;(112):36-45
Date
Mar-2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Humans
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Quebec
Questionnaires
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
Nurses in hospitals are not active in smoking cessation because of certain beliefs and attitudes. Beliefs and attitudes must be measured for changing practice in quitting smoking. The objective is to develop and validate a questionnaire on smoking cessation practices of nurses in hospitals.
A methodological study was conducted to construct a questionnaire (n = 118) according to the theory of planned behaviour, to validate by four experts, for reliability and validation of instruments constructs (n = 38; n = 29; n = 157).
An initial questionnaire on practices in smoking cessation was built according to the beliefs of a convenience sample of 118 nurses. Validation of experts was conducted, and the questionnaire obtained an index of content validation (ICV) of 0.94. Subsequently, after two convenience samples (n = 38; n = 29) and a random sample (n = 157), the questionnaire obtained reliability, measured by Cronbach's alpha ranging in 0.697 and 0.93 1. Finally, moderately high correlations (0.406 to 0.569) were obtained between concepts.
A reliable and valid questionnaire in French is available to measure smoking cessation practices.
PubMed ID
23671985 View in PubMed
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Creating a new articulation between research and practice through policy? The views and experiences of researchers and practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183012
Source
J Health Serv Res Policy. 2003 Oct;8 Suppl 2:44-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Jean-Louis Denis
Pascale Lehoux
Myriam Hivon
François Champagne
Author Affiliation
Interdisciplinary Health Research Group, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Health Serv Res Policy. 2003 Oct;8 Suppl 2:44-50
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Data Collection
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Services Research - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Interprofessional Relations
Policy Making
Quebec
Research Personnel
Abstract
In 1990, the Quebec Social Research Council - a body financing social research in Quebec, Canada - launched a new policy encouraging the development of social research units within health care organizations. Through financial incentives, it encouraged the implementation of long-term collaborations between researchers and practitioners with the purpose of transforming both scientific knowledge production and professional practices. This paper examines the perceptions of researchers and practitioners regarding the attributes and the usefulness of this collaborative research policy.
A self-administered survey was sent to all the researchers (n = 146; response rate 78.1%) and practitioners (n = 204; response rate 44.1%) involved in the 21 collaborative research teams funded in 1998. T-tests were performed in order to assess the difference between the perceptions of researchers and practitioners in five key dimensions of collaborative research.
The results showed that, contrary to expectations, researchers and practitioners shared fairly similar views regarding the various dimensions of collaborative research. They both agreed that their involvement within collaborative research teams had contributed to the development of new skills and practices but had not facilitated their participation in external activities nor their involvement in networks and organizations that influence environments in which public policies and practices are deployed. They also both encountered some difficulties in putting the dimensions that they highly valued into practice.
Collaborative research within health care organizations succeeded in fostering the implementation of new modes of knowledge production and intervention. Nevertheless, special attention needs to be given to the development of strategies to reduce the discrepancies between values and practices.
PubMed ID
14596747 View in PubMed
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Ethics and the compensation of immigrant workers for work-related injuries and illnesses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151902
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2010 Oct;12(5):707-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Sylvie Gravel
Bilkis Vissandjée
Katherine Lippel
Jean-Marc Brodeur
Louis Patry
François Champagne
Author Affiliation
Department of Management, Business School, Quebec University at Montreal, Interuniversity Research Center on integration and immigration Metropolis, succursale Downtown, Montreal, QC, Canada. gravel.s@uqam.qc.ca
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2010 Oct;12(5):707-14
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Workers' Compensation - economics - ethics
Wounds and Injuries - diagnosis - economics - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper examines the compensation process for work-related injuries and illnesses by assessing the trajectories of a sample of immigrant and non-immigrant workers (n = 104) in Montreal. Workers were interviewed to analyze the complexity associated with the compensation process. Experts specialized in compensation issues assessed the difficulty of the interviewees' compensation process. Immigrant workers faced greater difficulties with medical, legal, and administrative issues than non-immigrants did. While immigrant workers' claim forms tended to be written more often by employers or friends (58% vs. 8%), the claims were still more often contested by employers (64% vs. 24%). Immigrant workers were less likely to obtain a precise diagnosis (64% vs. 42%) and upon returning to work were more likely to face sub-optimal conditions. Such results throw into relief issues of ethics and equity in host societies that are building their economy with migrant workers.
PubMed ID
19308731 View in PubMed
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Perceptions of traumatic brain injury network participants about network performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143870
Source
Brain Inj. 2010;24(6):812-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Marie-Eve Lamontagne
Bonnie R Swaine
André Lavoie
François Champagne
Anne-Claire Marcotte
Author Affiliation
Unité de traumatologie - urgence - soins intensifs, Centre de recherche FRSQ du CHA universitaire de Québec, Québec, Canada. marieeve.lamontagne@umontreal.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2010;24(6):812-22
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Community Networks - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Efficiency, Organizational
Female
Humans
Male
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Trauma Centers - organization & administration
Abstract
Networks have been implemented within trauma systems to overcome problems of fragmentation and lack of coordination. Such networks regroup many types of organizations that could have different perceptions of network performance. No study has explored the perceptions of traumatic brain injury (TBI) network participants regarding network performance.
To document the perceptions of TBI network participants concerning the importance of different dimensions of performance and to explore whether these perceptions vary according to organization types.
Participants of network organizations were surveyed using a questionnaire based on a conceptual framework of performance (the EGIPSS framework).
Network organizations reported dimensions related to goal attainment to be more important than dimensions related to process. Differences existed between the perceptions of various types of network organizations for some but not all domains and dimensions of performance.
Network performance appears different from the performance of an individual organization and the consideration of the various organizations' perceptions in clarifying this concept should improve its comprehensiveness and its acceptability by all stakeholders.
PubMed ID
20433284 View in PubMed
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Quality of working life indicators in Canadian health care organizations: a tool for healthy, health care workplaces?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176279
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2005 Jan;55(1):54-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Donald C Cole
Lynda S Robson
Louise Lemieux-Charles
Wendy McGuire
Claude Sicotte
Francois Champagne
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work & Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. dcole@iwh.on.ca
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2005 Jan;55(1):54-9
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Personnel
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Occupational Health
Occupational Health Services - organization & administration
Quality of Life
Abstract
Quality-of-work-life (QWL) includes broad aspects of the work environment that affect employee learning and health. Canadian health care organizations (HCOs) are being encouraged to monitor QWL, expanding existing occupational health surveillance capacities.
To investigate the understanding, collection, diffusion and use of QWL indicators in Canadian HCOs.
We obtained cooperation from six diverse public HCOs managing 41 sites. We reviewed documentation relevant to QWL and conducted 58 focus groups/team interviews with strategic, support and programme teams. Group interviews were taped, reviewed and analysed for themes using qualitative data techniques. Indicators were classified by purpose and HCO level.
QWL indicators, as such, were relatively new to most HCOs yet the data managed by human resource and occupational health and safety support teams were highly relevant to monitoring of employee well-being (119 of 209 mentioned indicators), e.g. sickness absence. Monitoring of working conditions (62/209) was also important, e.g. indicators of employee workload. Uncommon were indicators of biomechanical and psychosocial hazards at work, despite their being important causes of morbidity among HCO employees. Although imprecision in the definition of QWL indicators, limited links with other HCO performance measures and inadequate HCO resources for implementation were common, most HCOs cited ways in which QWL indicators had influenced planning and evaluation of prevention efforts.
Increase in targeted HCO resources, inclusion of other QWL indicators and greater integration with HCO management systems could all improve HCO decision-makers' access to information relevant to employee health.
PubMed ID
15699091 View in PubMed
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[Strategies to increase the brief interventions in smoking cessation among nurses in hospital settings: experimental study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104307
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2014 Mar;(116):57-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Mario Lepage
Lise Renaud
François Champagne
Michèle Rivard
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2014 Mar;(116):57-69
Date
Mar-2014
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Nurse's Practice Patterns
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Quebec
Smoking Cessation - methods
Abstract
Research results demonstrate a decrease in cigarette smoking when preventive professional interventions are routinely carried out. Literature reports that 30% of hospital nurses assess their patient smoking habits. The objective of the present study is to compare, on medical and surgical units, the effectiveness of three strategies (interactive educational session, recall, and both together) to a control group, on the number of nursing interventions pertaining to cessation of cigarette smoking. Research design is experimental with group randomisation. Pre and post strategy multi-measurements (at 1 and 3 months) are sought from nursing staff (69), patients and patient charts (351). Results show that nursing staff assesses cigarette smoking habits for only 35.7% of the patients, and their intent to stop smoking only of the time. Results show that the educational strategy increases the number of nursing interventions during a short period (1 month), and decreases perception of barriers to tobacco counselling. Impact of recall could not be assessed as it was not introduced as planned.
Considering modest results from the strategies, the interactive educational sessions shows a short- term effect on the nursing staff's interventions.
PubMed ID
24830223 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.