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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Aug 12;124(15):1938-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-12-2004
Author
Finn Skårderud
Jan H Rosenvinge
K Gunnar Götestam
Author Affiliation
Regionsenteret for barne- og ungdomspsykiatri, Helseregion Øst og Sør, Postboks 23 Tåsen, 0801 Oslo. finn.skarderud@psykiatri.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Aug 12;124(15):1938-42
Date
Aug-12-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Eating Disorders - epidemiology - history - psychology - therapy
English Abstract
Family - psychology
Female
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Abstract
This article gives an updated review of the history, epidemiology, etiology, and evidence-based treatment of eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder), with specific reference to the Norwegian situation. In order to improve clinical skills there is an emphasis on the need for more treatment resources, particularly for the most serious cases, better implementation of evidence-based treatment and on continuous medical education. Given the somatic manifestations of eating disorders, medical doctors are essential in assessment and treatment. Many patients can be successfully treated by general practitioners provided that the general practitioner takes an interest in and is knowledgeable about eating disorders. The need to increase the number of general practitioners participating in ongoing Norwegian educational programmes on eating disorders is stressed.
PubMed ID
15306864 View in PubMed
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Fluctuations of body images in anorexia nervosa: patients' perception of contextual triggers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134286
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2012 Nov-Dec;19(6):518-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ester M S Espeset
Kjersti S Gulliksen
Ragnfrid H S Nordbø
Finn Skårderud
Arne Holte
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ester.espeset@fhi.no
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2012 Nov-Dec;19(6):518-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - psychology
Body Dysmorphic Disorders - psychology
Body Image
Cues
Eating - psychology
Emotions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Narration
Norway
Qualitative Research
Risk factors
Uncertainty
Abstract
Body image disturbance is a central diagnostic criterion of anorexia nervosa (AN). To a great extent, previous studies have conceptualized body image disturbance as a relatively stable and trait-like characteristic of the patient. There is, however, growing evidence that body images fluctuate in different situations and contexts. The aim of the present study was to explore which everyday contexts that patients with AN themselves associate with fluctuations in body image. Thirty-two women (20-35 years) who had been diagnosed with AN (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) within the last year participated. Semi-open and focused qualitative interviews were conducted, transcribed and analyzed using Grounded Theory techniques. The results suggest that body image is a dynamic phenomenon that may fluctuate in different situations and contexts. The participants linked such fluctuations to their own uncertainty about their real appearance. In lack of a stable and integrated experience of their own body, they were extremely sensitive towards body image threats and challenges in their daily life and reacted to these situations by fluctuations in their body image. Four contextual cues were found to trigger such changes in body image: these were eating food, being reminded of one's body appearance, relating to one's own emotional signals and interpreting other people's expressed and unexpressed opinions about oneself and one's appearance. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed.
Individuals with anorexia nervosa may have quite varied body image experiences in different contexts. The contexts identified in this study may be a point of departure for clinicians in helping their patients to explore their subjective body image experiences and to connect these with emotional, cognitive and relational contexts in a psychologically meaningfully way.
PubMed ID
21604326 View in PubMed
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The malnourished athlete--guidelines for interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120414
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Sep 18;132(17):1944
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-18-2012
Author
Finn Skårderud
Terje Fladvad
Heidi Holmlund
Ina Garthe
Lars Engebretsen
Author Affiliation
Institutt for spesialpedagogikk, Universitetet i Oslo, Norway. finns@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Sep 18;132(17):1944
Date
Sep-18-2012
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Athletes
Attitude to Health
Competitive Behavior
Diet - standards
Eating Disorders - prevention & control
Humans
Malnutrition - prevention & control
Norway
Practice Guidelines as Topic
PubMed ID
23007353 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Apr 16;129(8):773-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-2009
Author
Finn Skårderud
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for helse- og sosialfag, Høgskolen i Lillehammer, 2626 Lillehammer. finns@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Apr 16;129(8):773-5
Date
Apr-16-2009
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria
Drama
Greek World
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
History, Ancient
Humans
Medicine in Literature
Norway
Pain - psychology
Self-Injurious Behavior - history
Symbolism
Abstract
European literature contains fictional descriptions of self-harm and self-punishment over a time span of almost 2 500 years. This article presents such descriptions, from Sofocles' tragedy about King Oedipus to contemporary literature. Particular interest is dedicated to the Austrian Nobel prize laureate Elfriede Jelinek and the Norwegian author Karl Ove Knausgård. In Jelinek's fictional universe, self-harm is particularly related to the topic of autonomy in a family context; while Knausgård describes the role of shame in triggering and sustaining self-harming behaviour.
PubMed ID
19373315 View in PubMed
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