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[Cause of death registry--an important data source for medical research].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187057
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Oct 30;122(26):2551-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-2002
Author
Finn Gjertsen
Author Affiliation
finn.gjertsen@ssb.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Oct 30;122(26):2551-4
Date
Oct-30-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Confidentiality
Ethics, Research
Humans
Mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Public Health Informatics
Registries - classification - ethics - standards
Research - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Statistics on mortality and cause of death are of crucial importance to epidemiological research. The Cause of Death Register kept by Statistics Norway is the only national register including information on cause of death for all deceased persons registered as residents in Norway at their time of death, whether death occurred in Norway or abroad. This article presents historical information and guidelines for research access to individual data on cause of death.
PubMed ID
12522884 View in PubMed
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Chain of care for patients with intentional self-harm: an effective strategy to reduce suicide rates?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98196
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2009 Dec;39(6):614-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Ingeborg Rossow
Lars Mehlum
Finn Gjertsen
Bjørn Møller
Author Affiliation
The Suicide Research and Prevention Unit, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. ir@sirus.no
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2009 Dec;39(6):614-22
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Norway
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - therapy
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Chain of care for patients with intentional self-harm was important in the Norwegian national action plan to prevent suicide. In this study there were two aims: (1) to calculate the potential effects of chain of care on reducing suicide rates, and (2) to assess whether suicide rates decreased more in areas where chain of care had been implemented than in other areas. We observed no differences in changes in suicide rates between areas with and without the intervention. The calculated potential effects of chain of care on national suicide rates were very small, even under unrealistically favorable conditions.
PubMed ID
20121324 View in PubMed
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Changes in statistical methods affected the validity of official suicide rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135446
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2011 Oct;64(10):1102-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Finn Gjertsen
Lars Age Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Suicide Research and Prevention, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, NO-Oslo, Norway. finn.gjertsen@fhi.no
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2011 Oct;64(10):1102-8
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death - trends
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Statistics as Topic
Suicide - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
This study investigates whether changes in registration and coding practices influenced official suicide rates in Norway from 1988 to 2002.
A Poisson regression model was used to evaluate rates of suicide and potentially competing underlying causes of death. Setting in Norway 1988-2002.
From 1988 to 1994, suicide mortality decreased significantly, by 23.7%. Simultaneously, rates of causes of death potentially masking suicide decreased or remained fairly stable. From 1994 to 2002, however, there were no significant changes in suicide rates but accidental poisoning, which may mask suicide, increased significantly by 32.4%. Also, "ill-defined causes" of death increased by 16.7%, indicating poorer data quality.
This study suggests that the decreasing suicide rate in 1988-94 reflects a real change. However, the general quality of mortality statistics has deteriorated since the late 1990s, making it difficult to assess developments since 1994. Such variations in the reliability of official suicide statistics complicate international comparisons. However, shifts in the death rate because of "ill-defined" causes could serve as a warning that data quality is not consistent over time.
PubMed ID
21477992 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of anorexia nervosa-related deaths in Norway (1992-2000): data from the National Patient Register and the Causes of Death Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175340
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2005 Apr;37(3):181-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Deborah L Reas
Einar Kjelsås
Torhild Heggestad
Lasse Eriksen
Søren Nielsen
Finn Gjertsen
K Gunnar Götestam
Author Affiliation
Sintef-Unimed, Mental Health Services, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2005 Apr;37(3):181-7
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anorexia Nervosa - mortality
Cause of Death
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
This study investigated demographic and diagnostic characteristics of individuals whose medical record or death certificate indicated the presence of anorexia nervosa at the time of death.
Two national registers, the National Patient Register (NPR) and the Causes of Death Register (CODR), were examined in Norway for anorexia nervosa-related deaths occurring across a 9-year period (1992-2000).
The medical record or death certificate listed anorexia nervosa as a diagnosis or cause of death for 66 individuals. Rates of death were 6.46 and 9.93 per 100,000 deaths for the NPR and the CODR, respectively. A substantial percentage of deaths (43.9%) in both registers occurred at or above the age of 65 years. For the NPR, the mean age at the time of death was 61 years and 31% of deaths occurred among men. For the CODR, the mean age at the time of death was 49 years and 18% of deaths occurred among men.
Potential merits and shortcomings of assessing mortality rates using register-based data without linkage to a previously identified clinical sample are discussed.
PubMed ID
15822079 View in PubMed
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Comparing ICD-9 and ICD-10: the impact on intentional and unintentional injury mortality statistics in Italy and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126907
Source
Injury. 2013 Jan;44(1):132-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Finn Gjertsen
Silvia Bruzzone
Margarete E Vollrath
Monica Pace
Oivind Ekeberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. finn.gjertsen@fhi.no
Source
Injury. 2013 Jan;44(1):132-8
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Female
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Mortality - trends
Norway - epidemiology
Public Health
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
The international classification of diseases (ICD) provides guidelines for the collection, classification and dissemination of official cause-of-death statistics. New revisions of the ICD can potentially disrupt time trends of cause-of-death statistics and affect between-country comparisons. The aim of this study was to measure how switching from ICD-9 to ICD-10 affected mortality statistics for external causes of death, i.e. intentional and unintentional injuries, in Italy and Norway.
A sample of death certificates (N=454,897) were selected in Italy from the first year the ICD-10 was implemented (2003) and reclassified from ICD-10 to ICD-9 by the Italian National Institute of Statistics. A sample of death certificates was also selected in Norway (N=10,706) from the last year the ICD-9 was used (1995) and reclassified according to ICD-10 by Statistics Norway. The reclassification (double-coding) was performed by special trained personal in governmental offices responsible for official mortality statistics. Although the reclassification covered all causes of death (diseases and injuries) in the sample, our analysis focused on just one ICD chapter XX. This was external causes of mortality (injury deaths), and covered 15 selected categories of injuries.
The switch from ICD-9 to ICD-10 had a significant net impact on 8 of the 15 selected categories. In Italy, accidental falls decreased by 76%; traffic accidents decreased by 9%; suicide by hanging decreased by 3%; events of undetermined intent decreased by 69%; and overall injury deaths decreased by 4%. These net decreases reflect the moving of death records from injury categories in ICD-9 to other injury or disease categories in ICD-10. In Norway, the number of records in three categories decreased significantly: transport accidents, 9%; traffic accidents, 13%; and suicide by self-poisoning, 18%. No statistically significant differences (net changes) were observed in the total number of accidents, suicides and homicides in either country.
Switching to ICD-10 did not change the overall trends for accidents, homicides and suicides in either country. However, the number of records in some injury subcategories e.g. accidental falls and traffic accidents, decreased. Changing classification can thus affect the ranking of causes of injury mortality, with consequences for public health policy.
PubMed ID
22341556 View in PubMed
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Deaths by poisoning in Norway 2003-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280678
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2016 Jul;54(6):495-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Jartrud Wigen Skjerdal
Erik Andrew
Finn Gjertsen
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2016 Jul;54(6):495-500
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Analgesics, Opioid - poisoning
Cause of Death
Heroin - poisoning
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Methadone - poisoning
Norway - epidemiology
Poisoning - mortality
Public Health
Registries
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Poisoning is an important category of avoidable deaths in Norway and an important public health issue. Close monitoring of any development in this field is essential for effective preventive measures.
To assess the pattern and trends of poisoning mortality in Norway from 2003 to 2012 based on official mortality data.
This is a population-based registry study. We analyzed the underlying external cause of death data, in order to assess poisoning deaths (ICD-10) by accidents (X40-X49); intentional self-harm (suicide) (X60-X69); assault (homicide) (X85-X90); and poisoning of undetermined intent (Y10-Y19). We compared poisoning deaths to other injury mechanisms and used multiple injury cause data to identify substances involved in poisoning deaths. Poisson regression was applied to estimate the trend.
Poisoning was the second leading mechanism of injury deaths in Norway from 2003 to 2012, causing between 424 and 496 deaths each year. The rates of poisoning deaths varied between 8 and 11 per 100,000 inhabitants, with a peak in 2004. About 3366 of the 4620 poisoning deaths in the decade were accidental. Opioids were the most common causative agents. Heroin caused 150 deaths in 2004. The numbers fell to 63 in 2012 but showed great yearly variations. Deaths by methadone increased from 24 in 2003 to 61 in 2012.
Poisoning mortality rates declined from 2003 to 2012. Interpretation of the data, however, should be done with caution, and comparison with other countries may be biased due to differences in data production procedures. Evaluation of the effect of preventive measures to reduce mortality should be emphasized.
Poisonings remain a significant cause of mortality by injury in Norway. Emphasis should be placed on following the trends closely, especially regarding methadone deaths.
PubMed ID
27091213 View in PubMed
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Mixed impact of firearms restrictions on fatal firearm injuries in males: a national observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105445
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Jan;11(1):487-506
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Finn Gjertsen
Antoon Leenaars
Margarete E Vollrath
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosomatics and Health Behavior, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway. finn.gjertsen@fhi.no.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Jan;11(1):487-506
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Firearms - legislation & jurisprudence
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Norway
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Wounds, Gunshot - mortality
Abstract
Public health organizations have recommended restricted access and safe storage practices as means to reduce firearm injuries and deaths. We aimed to assess the effect of four firearm restrictions on firearm deaths in Norway 1969-2009.
All deaths due to firearm discharge were included (5,660 deaths, both sexes). The statistical analysis to assess impact of firearm legislations was restricted to males because of the sex disproportionality (94% were males).
A total of 89% of firearm deaths (both sexes) were classified as suicide, 8% as homicide, and 3% as unintentional (accident). During the past four decades, male accidental firearm death rates were reduced significantly by 90%. Male firearms suicide rates increased from 1969 to 1991 by 166%, and decreased by 62% from 1991 to 2009. Despite the great reduction in male accidental firearm deaths, we were unable to demonstrate effects of the laws. In contrast, we found that a 1990 regulation, requiring a police permit before acquiring a shotgun, had a beneficial impact on suicide in the total sample and in those aged 15-34 years. Male firearm homicides decreased post-2003 regulation regarding storing home guard weapons in private homes.
Our findings suggest that two laws could have contributed to reduce male firearm mortality. It is, however, a challenge to measure the role of four firearm restrictions. The null findings are inconclusive, as they may reflect no true impact or study limitations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24380979 View in PubMed
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Sudden death in sports among young adults in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146464
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2010 Jun;17(3):337-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Erik Ekker Solberg
Finn Gjertsen
Erlend Haugstad
Lars Kolsrud
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. Erik.Solberg@Diakonsyk.no
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2010 Jun;17(3):337-41
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Autopsy
Cause of Death
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Medical Records
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Sports
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to explore sudden cardiac death during physical activity in young adults in Norway.
This retrospective study examined adults aged 15-34 years during the period 1990-1997. The Cause of Death Registry was used to identify cases of sudden cardiac death in sports. These cases were validated with information from medical records and autopsy reports.
Twenty-three sports-related sudden deaths (22 men), mean age 27 years (17-34 years), were identified. Causes of death were myocardial infarction (11), myocarditis (5), conduction abnormalities (2), aortic stenosis (1), cardiac rupture (1), hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (1), congenital coronary anomaly (1), and coronary sclerosis without defined infarction (1). The deaths were distributed across different types of sports activities. The incidence of deaths among physically active young men was 0.9 per 100,000.
The number of myocardial infarctions is higher than expected. The incidence is similar to that found in other studies. A vast majority of the cases of death were men.
PubMed ID
20038839 View in PubMed
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