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3-year results of a collaborative school-based oral health program in a remote First Nations community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157485
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Publication Type
Article
Author
A J Macnab
J. Rozmus
D. Benton
F A Gagnon
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Department of Pediatrics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care for Children - methods
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Medically underserved area
Oral Hygiene - education - methods
School Health Services
Tooth Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Surveys of dental health among Aboriginal children in Canada, using scales such as the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) score, indicate that Aboriginal children have 2 to 3 times poorer oral health compared with other populations. A remote First Nations community approached requested assistance in addressing the health of their children. The objective was to work with the community to improve oral health and knowledge among school children. The hypothesis formulated was that after 3 years of the program there would be a significant decrease in dmft/DMFT (primary/permanent) score.
This was a cross-sectional study of all school-aged children in a small, remote First Nations community. Pre- and post- intervention evaluation of oral health was conducted by a dentist not involved in the study. The intervention consisted of a school-based program with daily brush-ins, fluoride application, educational presentations, and a recognition/incentive scheme.
Twenty-six children were assessed prior to the intervention, representing 45% of the 58 children then in the community. All 40 children in the community were assessed following the intervention. Prior to the intervention, 8% of children were cavity free. Following 3 years of the intervention, 32% were cavity free. Among the 13 children assessed both pre- and post-intervention, dmft/DMFT score improved significantly (p
PubMed ID
18444770 View in PubMed
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The cost-benefit of pulse-oximeter use in the prehospital environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197749
Source
Prehosp Disaster Med. 1999 Oct-Dec;14(4):245-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
A J Macnab
L. Susak
F A Gagnon
J. Alred
C. Sun
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Canada. amacnab@cw.bc.ca
Source
Prehosp Disaster Med. 1999 Oct-Dec;14(4):245-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances
British Columbia
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Critical Pathways
Health Care Costs
Humans
Oximetry - economics
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Pulse-oximetry has proven clinical value in Emergency Departments and Intensive Care Units. In the prehospital environment, oxygen is given routinely in many situations. It was hypothesized that the use of pulse oximeters in the prehospital setting would provide a measurable cost-benefit by reducing the amount of oxygen used.
This was a prospective study conducted at 12 ambulance stations (average transport times > 20 minutes). Standard care protocols and paramedic assessments were used to determine which patients received oxygen and the initial flow rate used. Pulse-oximetry measurements (SpO2) were then taken. If SpO2 fell below 92% or rose above 96% (except in patients with chest pain), oxygen (O2) flow rates were adjusted. Costs of oxygen use were calculated: volume that would have been used based on initial flow rate; and volume actually used based on actual flow rates and transport time.
A total of 1,907 patients were recruited. Oximetry and complete data were obtained on 1,787 (94%). Of these, 1,329 (74%) received O2 by standard protocol: 389 (27.5%) had the O2 flow decreased; 52 had it discontinued. Eighty-seven patients (6%) not requiring O2 standard protocol were hypoxemic (SpO2
PubMed ID
10915411 View in PubMed
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Effect of helmet wear on the incidence of head/face and cervical spine injuries in young skiers and snowboarders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187548
Source
Inj Prev. 2002 Dec;8(4):324-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
A J Macnab
T. Smith
F A Gagnon
M. Macnab
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. amacnab@cw.bc.ca
Source
Inj Prev. 2002 Dec;8(4):324-7
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cervical Vertebrae - injuries
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Facial Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Head Protective Devices - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prospective Studies
Safety
Skiing - injuries - statistics & numerical data
Spinal Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To evaluate whether helmets increase the incidence and/or severity of cervical spine injury; decrease the incidence of head injury; and/or increase the incidence of collisions (as a reflection of adverse effects on peripheral vision and/or auditory acuity) among young skiers and snowboarders.
During one ski season (1998-99) at a world class ski resort, all young skiers and snowboarders (
Notes
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PubMed ID
12460972 View in PubMed
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