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6 records – page 1 of 1.

The clinical spectrum of the oculo-respiratory syndrome after influenza vaccination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185412
Source
Vaccine. 2003 Jun 2;21(19-20):2354-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-2003
Author
Gaston De Serres
Jean Luc Grenier
Eveline Toth
Suzanne Ménard
Renée Roussel
Michèle Tremblay
Monique Douville Fradet
Monique Landry
Yves Robert
Danuta M Skowronski
Author Affiliation
Quebec National Institute of Public Health, Québec, Que, Canada. gaston.deserres@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2003 Jun 2;21(19-20):2354-61
Date
Jun-2-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Eye Diseases - classification - etiology
Female
Humans
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Respiratory Tract Diseases - classification - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Oculo-respiratory syndrome (ORS), a new influenza vaccine associated adverse event, was identified in 2000. The 2000 case definition (ORS-2000) required the presence of bilateral red eyes or respiratory symptoms or facial edema occurring between 2 and 24h following immunization and lasting 24 h), ORS-persistors (duration >48 h).Overall, the distribution of symptoms was similar between ORS-2000 and other case categories. ORS-early and ORS-late had less ocular involvement, ORS-late and ORS-persistors had more cough and sore throat, ORS-early had more facial edema and ORS-late had less. In comparison to ORS-2000, ORS-early were younger whereas ORS-persistors and ORS-late were significantly older suggesting that clinical manifestations of ORS vary with age with a more rapid induction of symptoms in younger individuals and longer duration for older ones.
PubMed ID
12744866 View in PubMed
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Increased risk of anaphylaxis following administration of 2009 AS03-adjuvanted monovalent pandemic A/H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) vaccine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106576
Source
Vaccine. 2013 Dec 5;31(50):5989-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-5-2013

Largest measles epidemic in North America in a decade--Quebec, Canada, 2011: contribution of susceptibility, serendipity, and superspreading events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117835
Source
J Infect Dis. 2013 Mar 15;207(6):990-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2013
Author
Gaston De Serres
France Markowski
Eveline Toth
Monique Landry
Danielle Auger
Marlène Mercier
Philippe Bélanger
Bruno Turmel
Horacio Arruda
Nicole Boulianne
Brian J Ward
Danuta M Skowronski
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Quebec City, QC G1E 7G9, Canada. gaston.deserres@inspq.qc.ca
Source
J Infect Dis. 2013 Mar 15;207(6):990-8
Date
Mar-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Susceptibility
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Measles - epidemiology - immunology - transmission
Quebec - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Travel
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The largest measles epidemic in North America in the last decade, occurred in 2011 in Quebec, Canada, where rates of 1- and 2-dose vaccine coverage among children 3 years of age were 95%-97% and 90%, respectively, with 3%-5% unvaccinated.
Case patients identified through passive surveillance and outbreak investigation were contacted to determine clinical course, vaccination status, and possible source of infection.
There were 21 measles importations and 725 cases. A superspreading event triggered by 1 importation resulted in sustained transmission and 678 cases. The overall incidence was 9.1 per 100,000; the highest incidence was in adolescents 12-17 years old (75.6 per 100,000), who comprised 56% of case patients. Among adolescents, 22% had received 2 vaccine doses. Outbreak investigation showed this proportion to have been an underestimate; active case finding identified 130% more cases among 2-dose recipients. Two-dose recipients had milder illness and a significantly lower risk of hospitalization than those who were unvaccinated or single-dose recipients.
A chance superspreading event revealed an overall level of immunity barely above the elimination threshold when unexpected vulnerability in 2-dose recipients was taken into account. Unvaccinated individuals remain the immunization priority, but a better understanding of susceptibility in 2-dose recipients is needed to define effective interventions if elimination is to be achieved.
PubMed ID
23264672 View in PubMed
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Oculo-respiratory syndrome after influenza vaccination: trends over four influenza seasons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174884
Source
Vaccine. 2005 May 25;23(28):3726-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-25-2005
Author
Gaston De Serres
Eveline Toth
Suzanne Ménard
Jean Luc Grenier
Renée Roussel
Michèle Tremblay
Monique Landry
Yves Robert
Louis Rochette
Danuta M Skowronski
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Canada. gaston.deserres@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2005 May 25;23(28):3726-32
Date
May-25-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Eye Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Oculo-respiratory syndrome (ORS) following influenza vaccination was identified in Canada in 2000. This report describes trends of ORS reported during four consecutive seasons 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2003 in the province of Quebec, Canada.
Data come from the vaccine-associated adverse event (VAAE) passive reporting system of the Province of Quebec.
The rate of ORS reported per 100000 doses distributed declined from 46.6 in 2000 to 34.2, 20.6 and 9 in 2001, 2002 and 2003, respectively. There was no significant difference in rates for ORS between the two vaccines in use in Canada (Fluviral and Vaxigrip) both in 2001 and 2002. During the 4 years, incidence was highest in people aged 40-59 years and declined in older age groups. The clinical profile of ORS has remained remarkably stable over years. Overall, ocular, respiratory symptoms or facial edema were reported by 58%, 84% and 31% of patients, respectively, and 15% had symptoms including all three symptom categories. ORS lasted more than a week in 8-13% of the cases.
ORS is an adverse event that occurred with both influenza vaccines used in Canada. Its frequency has declined substantially but is still present after 4 years. It constitutes a clinical entity distinct from anaphylactic allergy. Unlike anaphylaxis, ORS does not constitute an absolute contraindication to further doses.
PubMed ID
15882534 View in PubMed
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Oculo-respiratory syndrome following influenza vaccination: evidence for occurrence with more than one influenza vaccine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185413
Source
Vaccine. 2003 Jun 2;21(19-20):2346-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-2003
Author
Gaston De Serres
Nicole Boulianne
Bernard Duval
Louis Rochette
Jean Luc Grenier
Renée Roussel
Danièle Donaldson
Michèle Tremblay
Eveline Toth
Suzanne Ménard
Monique Landry
Yves Robert
Author Affiliation
Direction de la santé publique de Québec, Que, Québec, Canada G1E 7G9. gaston.deserres@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2003 Jun 2;21(19-20):2346-53
Date
Jun-2-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Eye Diseases - etiology
Female
Humans
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Vaccines, Inactivated - adverse effects
Abstract
We assessed the occurrence of oculo-respiratory syndrome (ORS) following two influenza vaccines: Fluviral (Shire Biologics) or Vaxigrip (Aventis Pasteur). ORS was identified amongst 5.3 and 4.6% of recipients, respectively (P=0.54). With both vaccines, the risk of ORS was much greater in individuals who had ORS the previous year (2000) than in those without such history. In multivariate analysis, the odds ratio for ORS for patients with a prior history of ORS varied between 9.4 and 9.6 (P
PubMed ID
12744865 View in PubMed
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Risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome following H1N1 influenza vaccination in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122722
Source
JAMA. 2012 Jul 11;308(2):175-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-11-2012
Author
Philippe De Wals
Geneviève Deceuninck
Eveline Toth
Nicole Boulianne
Denis Brunet
Renée-Myriam Boucher
Monique Landry
Gaston De Serres
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. Philippe.De.Wals@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
JAMA. 2012 Jul 11;308(2):175-81
Date
Jul-11-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Immunologic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Guillain-Barre Syndrome - epidemiology
Humans
Immunization Programs
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk
Time Factors
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
In fall 2009 in Quebec, Canada, an immunization campaign was launched against the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic strain, mostly using an AS03 adjuvant vaccine. By the end of the year, 57% of the 7.8 million residents had been vaccinated.
To assess the risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) following pandemic influenza vaccine administration.
Population-based cohort study with follow-up over the 6-month period October 2009 through March 2010. The investigation was ordered by the chief medical officer of health in accordance with the Quebec Public Health Act.
All acute care hospitals and neurology clinics in Quebec.
Suspected and confirmed GBS cases reported by physicians, mostly neurologists, during active surveillance or identified in the provincial hospital summary discharge database. Medical records were reviewed and cases classified according to Brighton Collaboration definitions (categorized as level 1, 2, or 3, corresponding to criteria of decreasing certainty in diagnosis). Immunization status was verified and denominators were estimated from the provincial immunization registry (4.4 million vaccinated) and census data (total target population aged =6 months, 7.8 million), with a total of 3,623,046 person-years of observation.
Relative and attributable risks were calculated using a Poisson model and the self-controlled case-series method.
Over a 6-month period, 83 confirmed GBS cases were identified, including 71 Brighton level 1 through 3 cases. Twenty-five confirmed cases had been vaccinated against 2009 influenza A(H1N1) 8 or fewer weeks before disease onset, with most (19/25) vaccinated 4 or fewer weeks before onset. In the Poisson model, the age- and sex-adjusted relative risk was 1.80 (95% CI, 1.12-2.87) for all confirmed cases during the 8-week postvaccination period and was 2.75 (95% CI, 1.63-4.62) during the 4-week postvaccination period. Using the self-controlled case-series method, relative risk estimates during the 4-week postvaccination period were 3.02 (95% CI, 1.64-5.56) for all confirmed cases (n = 42) and 2.33 (95% CI, 1.19-4.57) for Brighton level 1 through 3 cases (n = 36). The number of GBS cases attributable to vaccination was approximately 2 per 1 million doses. There was no indication of an excess risk in persons younger than 50 years.
In Quebec, the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) vaccine was associated with a small but significant risk of GBS. It is likely that the benefits of immunization outweigh the risks.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2012 Jul 11;308(2):184-522782421
PubMed ID
22782419 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.